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Full text of "Pacific Mining and Oil Reporter (1906-1907)"






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STATE 1 

PACIFIC MINlIf OIL REPORTER 



Vol. VIII 



San Francisco, Cal., November 5, 1906 


















■*■* 




^r 



TUNNEL ON THE PROPERTY OF THE MANHATTAN-NEVADA 
GOLD MINES. MANHATTAN. NEVADA 











HA VE YOU EVER USED 



South Chester Tube Co 

Guaranteed Wrought Iron 

CASING 

D RIVE PIPE 

OIL WELL TUBING 



S 



LINE PIPE 

If not, give It a trial 
and you will thereafter 
use no other make 



WOODS & HUDDART 

Pacific Coast Agents 

2123 PIERCE STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



141995 



PACIFIC MINING ft OIL REPORTER 



Vol. VIII. No. I 



San Francisco, Cal., November 5, 1906 



Price, 10 Cents 



MINERAL OUTPUT OF CALIFORNIA. 



State Mineralogist Lewis E. Anbury lias issued from the State Mining 
Bureau a tabulated sheet showing the output in amounts, values and by counties 
of the mineral products of California for the year 1905. This appears some- 
what later than usual as the records of many companies were destroyed in the 
gnat fire and it took a longer time to get corrected addresses and obtain the 
desired information. 

The following table shows the yield and value of mineral substances 
of California for the year 1905, as per returns received at the State Mining 
Bureau, San Francisco, in answer to inquiries sent to producers: 



Quantity. 
112 tons 
40,304 tons 
24,753 tons 



Value. 

2,625 

285,290 

60,436 



46,334 tons 1,019,158 



Asbestos 

Asphalt , 

Bituminous Rock 

Borax 

Brick 286,618 M 2,273,786 

Cement 1,265,553 bbls 1,791,916 

Chrome 40 tons 600 

Clay .' 133,805 tons 130,146 

Coal 46,500 tons 144,500 

per 16,997,489 tons 2,650,605 

1,344 tons 



9,257 tons 



38,000 

148,500 

8,121 

19,197,043 

228,738 cu. f t 353,837 

12,850 tons 54,500 

3,000 tons 15,000 



Fuller 's Earth 

Gems 

Glass Sand 

Gold 

Granite 

Gypsum 

Infusorial Earth 

Lead 533,680 lbs 25,083 

Lime 616,995 bbls 555,322 

Limestone 192,749 tons 323,325 

I, it hia Mica 25 tons 276 

Macadam 1,440,455 tons 942,503 

Magnesite 3,933 tons 16,221 

Marble 73,303 cu. ft 129,450 

Mineral Paint 754 tons 4,025 

Mineral Water 2,194,150 gals 538,700 

Natural Gas 148,345 M. eu. ft 102,479 

Paving Blocks 3,408 M 134,347 

Petroleum 34,275,701 bbls 9,007,820 



Platinum 

Pyrites 

Quicksilver 

Rubble 

Salt . ' 

Sandstone 302,813 eu. ft 

Silver 

Slate 

Soapstone 

Soda 

Tungsten 



200 oz ■ 3,320 

15,503 tons 63.95S 

24,655 flasks 886,081 

1,183,802 tons 774,267 

77,118 tons 141,925 

. . . 483,268 

. . . 678,494 

40,000 

3,000 

22,500 

18,800 



4,000 squares. 

300 tons . . . 

15,000 tons . . . 

52 tons . . . 



Total value $43,069,227 

The total yield of metallic substances, including gold and silver, was, for 
the year $23,523,984 and in these are also copper, quicksilver, chrome, lead, 
pyrites, platinum and tungsten. This is the first year the latter substance has 
been produced in California. 

The value of non-metallic substances was $2,145,930, including borax, salt, 
soda, mineral waters, asbestos, coal, Fuller's earth, gypsum, infusorial earth, 
lithia mica, magnesite, mineral paint and gems. 

The total value of hydrocarbons and natural gas was $9,456,025. The 
hydrocarbons include asphalt, bituminous rock, natural gas and petroleum. In 
1904 the product of petroleum in the State was 29,736,003 barrels, worth 
$8,317,809. The increase in output for the year is thus shown to be 4,539,698 
barrels and in value $690,011. 



the year was $7,943,288, an 

include lime and limestone, 
paving blocks, rubble, slate, 
In the latter substance the 
296,015 barrels, the number 

substances of the State, as 
econd, petroleum; third, cop- 
seventh, quicksilver; eight, 



In structural materials, the total value for 
increase ever 1904 of $668,(12. These materials 
macadam, glass sand, marble, granite, sandstone, 
soapstone, brick and pottery clays and cement. 
increase in the output for the year amounted to 
made in 1905 being 1,265,553 barrels. 

The relative value of the principal mineral 
shown by the tables, is as follows: First, gold; s 
per; fourth, cement; fifth, borax; sixth, macadai 
rubble. 

"While gold is still the leading mining product, its yield no longer puts 
the greatest gold-producing county in the first place. The petroleum of Kern 
county and the copper of Shasta give them precedence. Gold is more widely 
distributed than any other substance thus far mined in California; thirty-four 
counties out of the fifty-seven in the State showing a gold yield in 1905, and 
it is known to exist in several others. Nevada county produces more gold 
than any other in the State, its output for 1905 having been $3,179,715 gold 
alone. Butte county, with its numerous dredgers, comes next. Kern county 
is now the largest mineral producer in the State; its output of ten substances 
bringing its total value last year up to $4,912,095. Its petroleum alone was 
valued at $3,174,966, which was not quite up to Nevada county gold. Shasta 
county falls into third place for last year, instead of being first as it has 
been for several years, its copper production having fallen off materially, 
mainly on account of the cessation of smelting operations at Keswick by the 
Mountain Copper Company. Shasta's entire output for all minerals last year 
was $2,579,014. 

The following shows the output of the respective counties for 1905, as 
arranged by the State Mineralogist. He explains, however, that certain 
substances have to be placed in the "Unapportioned" column so as to con- 
ceal the identity of single mines in certain counties. For this reason it is 
necessary to put under this heading, borax, soda, coal, Portland cement, and 
a few other substances formerly credited to certain counties. If credited to 
the exact county, where there is only a single operator, private business 
would be made public. Under these circumstances, the figures of values of 
output in some counties do not actually represent their relative rank, as 
some of the products may be placed under "unapportioned." The total 
values of such substances appears in the main table, but not in the table of 
counties. Out of fifty-seven counties of the State, fifty-four made some min- 
eral production in 1905: 



Alameda county $ 662,687 

Alpine county 575 

Amador county 2,490,755 

Butte county 2,621,104 

Calaveras county 2,415,627 

Colusa county 289,454 

Contra Costa county . ... 197,493 

Del Norte county 10,612 

El Dorado county 467,566 

Fresno county 2,734,164 

Humboldt county 53,628 

Inyo county 222,596 

Kern county 4,912,095 

Kings county 33,000 

Lake county 271.437 

Los Angeles county 2,234,354 

Madera county 183,987 

Marin county 207,835 

Mariposa county 393,592 

Mendocino county 24,510 

Merced county 3,500 

Mono county 320,124 

Monterey county 23.121 

Napa county 261,910 

Nevada county 3,814,838 

Orange county 738,26 t 

Placer county 798,644 

Plumas county 284,497 



Riverside county 

Sacramento county 

San Benito county 

San Diego county 

San Bernardino county . . 
San Francisco county . . . 
San Joaquin county . 
San Luis Obispo county. . 

San Mateo county 

Santa Barbara county . . 

Santa Clara county 

Santa Cruz county 



558,369 
881,852 
360,145 
231,945 
820,026 
456,042 
146,915 
189,592 
203,936 
1,601,217 
470,130 
296,349 

Shasta county 2,579,014 

Sierra county 520,990 

Siskiyou county S06.877 

Solano county 201,091 

Sonoma county 318,873 

Stanislaus county 52,365 

Tehama county 9,000 

Trinity county 701! 

Tulare county 32,313 

Tuolumne county 1,389,774 

Ventura county 345,093 

Yolo county 200 

Yuba county 325.381 

' Unapportioned 3,491,523 



Total $43,069,227 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



PRODUCTION OF PETROLEUM IN 1905. 



BILLY MEEK.* 



During the year 1905 the oil fields of the United States produced 
134,717,580 barrels of petroleum, as against 117,080,960 barrels in 1904. This 
production was greater by 17,636,620 barrels than that of any previous year. 
It is an increase over the production of the year 1900 of 71,097,051 barrels, 
or considerably more than any total yearly production up to 1902. The pro- 
duction of petroleum in the United States has more than doubled within the 
last six years. The increase is in the heavier grades of the fuel class, the pro- 
duction of lighter or illuminating oils having remained constant. 

It is significant, however, that the value of the oil production for the. 
year 1905 was $17,018,056 less than for the year 1904. The 117,080,961) barrels 
of oil produced in 1904 was valued at $101,175,455, whereas the 134,717,580 
barrels of 1905 are rated at only $84,157,399. 

A simple statement of the number of barrels of petroleum taken from the 
earth each year no longer shows the condition of the business. The kind and 
quality of the oil produced must now be taken into consideration in order 
to understand the relation of production to demand and consumption. 

Of the production of the year 1905, 70,474,078 barrels are from the Gulf 
and California fields. This is almost exactly the quantity by which the pro- 
duction of the year 1905 exceeds that of the year 1900. The petroleum of 
the Gulf and California fields is of the heavier variety and has a residue 
of asphaltum. Oil of this quality, although capable of producing a small per- 
centage of illuminating oil, is principally valuable as a fuel. The consumption 
of heavy oils must, therefore, depend on the demand for this kind of fuel. 
The growth of this demand is bound to take time. 

The present price of petroleum of the Gulf and California type is no 
determination of its value. For a period of five years the production in this 
quarter has been faster than the rate at which the commercial world could 
adjust itself to the use of the new fuel. It is improbable that this great 
increase in production can go on indefinitely and as the steady increase in the 
consumption of oil for heat-making purposes is an assured fact an adjustment 
between production and consumption must needs come soon. 

Prior to the year 1904 the greater part of the lighter grades of petroleum 
that are especially adaptable to the manufacture of the illuminating oils 
came from the Appalachian and the Lima-Indiana fields. For a number 
of years the combined production of the two fields has been remarkably con- 
stant. During the time between the years 1894-1903, inclusive, it has averaged 
about 55,500,000 barrels a year. During the year 1904 the Appalachian field 
showed a slight falling off in production as compared with 1903, and in 1905 
a decrease in production of 6.5 per cent as compared with that of 1904. The 
Lima-Indiana and Illinois field held its production in 1904, but fell off 9.6 
per cent in the year 1905 as compared with the preceding year, notwithstanding 
the fact that the 181,084 barrels of oil produced by the State of Illinois were 
added to the production of that field. 

During the year 1904 the Mid-Continent field became an important factor 
in the production of the lighter petroleum. It added 4,250,779 barrels of oil 
during that year, not all of which, however, could be classed as of the lighter 
grades of petroleum. In 1905 the production increased to 12,013,495 barrels, 
with a much larger percentage of the better grades of petroleum. This increase 
from the new field more than offsets the decrease from the old territory, so 
that the total production of the lighter grades of oil during 1905 was fully 
7,000,000 barrels above the average production for a number of years. 

The consumption of illuminating oil from 1894 to 1903 slightly exceeded 
the production. The stocks held by the large pipe-line companies, which 
amounted to 33,772,823 barrels at the end of the year 1897, were reduced to 
20,772,823 barrels at the end of the year 1903. During the year 1904 there 
was a consumption of 55,968,171 barrels against a production of 61,715,278 
barrels, and in 1905 a consumption of 00,875,677 barrels against a production 
of 03,855,710 barrels. These two years caused an increase in the stocks held 
of 8,717,140 barrels. 

It is probable that the current year will show a still greater falling off in 
tli.- production of the Appalachian field than was experienced in 1905. The 
production from the State of Illinois will probably fully maintain the pro- 
duction of the Lima-Indiana and Illinois field, while all indications point to 
a very large production from the Mid-Continent field. Even with the mainte- 
nance of the large consumption of the year 1905, there is every indication of 
a strong increase in the accumulated stocks. 

The completion of a pipe line from Humboldt, Kans., to Whiting Ind 
marks another step in the transportation of oil, and "should be mentioned as 
an important feature of the year's achievements in the oil industrv. 



"Twenty-two miles to 'Billy' Meet's, " remarked a companion as, one 
of a party of four, the writer set out from Nevada City for a two-weeks' 
trip through the mining camps of Sierra county. 

"And who is 'Billy' Meek?" I inquired. 

"Who is 'Billy' Meek? He's the whitest man in California. I thought 
everybody knew him," came the reply. And later I did know him as a 
character standing out prominently in surroundings far less pleasing but for 
his presence. 




! Camptoi 



wned by " Billy " Meek. Porly of I 
(second from left) in foreground. 



My first acquaintance with "Billy" Meek more fully characterized the 
man to me than could, perhaps, have been possible under different circum- 
stances. Returning from a trip to the famous American Flag mine, he w:: ; 
perched upon the seat of a mountain wagon, gaily decorated in national colors 
and- loaded to overflowing with a crowd of happy school children, leading in 
a college yell in which the prodigy joined vociferously. As our teams stopped 
to allow a hasty exchange of greetings, as proud, care-free expressions on the 
faces of those children clearly showed the high estimation in which they held 
their champion. A moment later, as our horses sped on, "Billy" led in a 
patriotic air, their voices dying out in simple sweetness as we placed distance 
between us. But our hearts were warmer for the hearty greeting of our host, 
who was later awaiting us at his hostlery at Camptonville with all the hos- 
pitality of a true Knight of Chivalry. 

"Billy" Meek is on the tongue of every inhabitant in Camptonville in 
well-earned praise. They justly laud his good-fellowship and chivalry. They 
say that he owns Camptonville, but it takes the casual observer but a few 
hours' acquaintance in this cheerful, thriving, frontier town to know that 
Camptonville owns "Bill" Meek. 

A- few hours' acquaintance with this geuial gentleman is enough to con- 
vince one that he is a man of more than ordinary culture and manifold accom- 
plishments. He has seen much of the world and is well read. And he is a 
literary spirit of no mean ability. He is full of praise for the mining country 
in which he was born, which he says "is good enough for me." Although 
scarcely fifty years of age, he is a grandfather. 

Next morning as we were about to make our departure "Billy" appeared 
with an aged matron of probably four-score years upon his arm. "This lady 
is my sweetheart, gentlemen," he said. And she smiled back her appreciation. 
We left him a moment later, knowing that he would be glad to see us again. 

The following, one of the many products of "Billy" Meek's pen, more 
fully illustrates his true character than the writer of this sketch could ever 
hope to do. With it we will leave the reader with the hope that he may 
meet its author: 

No matter how you travel through or on life 's crooked road. 
You'll run across some fellow that will surely share your load. 
If you'll do as you'd be done by in this wicked world of sin, 
You'll surely find some fellow who will kindly ask you in. 



* This article appealed in the Pacific Oil Reporter issue of September 20th. 
On account of an unprecedented call for same we are reprinting to enable us 
to fill orders. — [Editor. 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORT l.k 



You may climb long ladder till you almost reach the top; 

lidowifle will surely lei y<m drop 
started, t<> eonunenee to climb again, 
climb the same old ladder, reach the top you can'1 t »*i l when. 

sorrow, I have seen litY in its Bin, 

n through II on muleback, 1 have been there full 

And thought that all was shining both in beaven and on earth, 
\itli alt the sin and shadows there's no one thai is worth. 
In this lif«- in satisfaction aa we travel on tin- road, 
fellow just the same as I who really packed his lo 

leaves fall in the autumn there's yet alwayi Ml. 

It will cling unto its branches that was clung to by them all. 
In those shadows left by others l am clinging to thai tree 
And the land thai gave me birthrighl is good enough Tor me. 

When our life of toil is over ami we've done all we could do, 
Did you treat the other fellow as you'd have him treat youl 
If you did. yonr life's blessing, for how often we forget 
To meet the other fellow as we'd wish to lie met. 




£h^ } 4md Meei 




Camptonville, Calif. 



B. P. O. E. 



Card of William Bull Meek. 

THE EVOLUTION OF MINING. 



None of the leading American industries have made greater progress than 
mining. There is as much difference between the modern stamp mill or the 
hydraulic giant and the arrastra and rocker of forty years ago as there is 
between the modern Pullman car and the old-time stage coach. Present in- 
dications lead many to believe that America will be known to the world, above 
all things else, as a mining country. Gold is being found in the least expected 
places, and t he Eldoradoes, Bonanzas and Golcondas are no longer confined to 
;i few favored districts of the West. 

Though a little over fifty years of age, the mining industry of America is 
yet in its infancy. The uncovering of vast bodies of ore that carry their 
values in rebellious composition, are making necessary the invention, discovery 
and manufacture of new machines and methods for the extraction of metals. 
And so the progress goes on, increasing, enlarging month by month, until the 
mind is dwarfed in an attempt to comprehend the possibilities of the future. 

Each of the bullion producers of the West had a small, a very small be- 
ginning. That beginning was a patient, weather-beaten prospector trailing his 
burro and pack over the mountain passes, everlastingly searching for "colors'' 
— colors of a prospect, a prospect of a ledge. The rinding of the ledge, the loca- 
tion of the claims brings to ;i elo<e the part a prospector plays in the develop- 
ment of a mine. The prospector leaves il a gem in the rough — capital and 
enterprise fashion it into a jewel. 

The mining capitalist — the man with money and enterprise — is the man 
who mohls a mine out of a prospect. To develop ;i ledge and shape it to be- 
come a producer is a slow and expensive business, and hence it can be readily 
understood why the average prospector who carries all he owns in his pack, 
has no inclination to develop a mine. Deep tunnels are driven in. shafts sunk, 
and drifts run following the ledge. After ore is "blocked out,"' and found to 
carry values, the property is ready fur a stamp mill, cyanide plant or smelter 
for I In- treatment of the ore and the extraction of the metal. 

The progress in the methods of placer mining in America has 1 n no less 

than that of quartz gold digging. The great hydraulic mines of the West 
began with a rocker, a pan and a hardy miner. The same auriferous diggings 
where today the giants are hurling their mighty streams against the gravel 
banks were first sera tidied over by the prospector's shovel. In the early 
days placer mining was a gamble; now it is a business in which capital and 
enterprise are prominent features. 



TIBER A RICH OIL PROPERTY. 



< >n. I :ilifornia oil corporations w h 

its stan. I among large produce] ot the State ii the Tiber Oil Com 

pany. operating in the Arroyo Grande field. This is a close corporation, com 

OJ practical oil men and organized as a busin.-ss pro] I Tin,, , 

none of the Btock on the market. Mr. A. A. McClurg, Sr., manager of the 

company, after spending ! wo months looking over the held, secured a lease 

on all of the lands u\' i he Consolidated Bituminous Rock Company in San Luis 
Obispo county, consisting of 1,320 acres id' whal is now proven to be oil land; 

also ninety- two acres on the deep water front at Cave landing, on San lads 

bay, where the big refinery of the .California Petroleum Refineries, Ltd., is 

now being built. The Tiber wells are within two and one-half miles of this 
landing and refinery and four miles on an air line from I'orl Harford. Two 
railroads, the Southern Pacific coast line ami the Pacific t 'oast Railroad inn 
through the property. The company lias one well finished and No. L' is now 
250 feet in the sand, and is a producer, hut will be drilled to the bottom of 
the sand. The sand here is, I think, the thickest oil sand that has ever been 
dis< overed, being a continuous oil-bearing sand over one thousand feet in 
thickness, and there is another sand below it nearly as thick. This lower 
sand is, however, at the point where we drilled, in the water, and dips at 
an angle of thirty degrees. By going north on the Tiber Oil Company's lands 
we can get this sand above the water level. We have here in this field a 
running stream of mountain water which runs through the Tiber lease for 
over a mile. In drilling No. 1 well we struck the pay sand at 865 feet and 
the well furnished its own fuel from that depth, flowing between the casing, 
besides the company sold to others who are drilling in the vicinity and for 
road purposes. At No. 2 well we struck the sand at 785 feet. This field is 
an ideal place to operate plenty of water and an ocean breeze keeps the 
climate delightful. Many of the book experts have turned this field down, 
and so now they do not like to give up their theory. The writer was not 
present when these massive oil sands were laid down nor wdieu "the war of 
elements, the wreck of matter, and the crush of worlds'' ripped open the 
bowels of the earth and folded nature's handiwork into these fantastic shapes, 
but he has been here with the drill and the drillers, and right here is the 
king of all the oil sands. 



GOOD OIL STRIKE AT ARROYO GRANDE. 



The Associated Oil Company has reached a depth of 2,000 feet in one of 
its wells in the Arroyo Grande field, San Luis Obispo county, and has encoun- 
tered a good body of oil formation which already assures the company of a 
good producer. The oil in this district is heavy in consistency, being particu- 
larly adapted for fuel purposes. Drilling will continue to gain a greater depth 
of oil-bearing formation, which, by the drilling of the Tiber well nearby, 
has been fully proven to exist. 

The success of the Associated and Tiber companies in this field proves 
up a very large area of valuable oil laud. The production of the district 
will be very valuable, owing to the close proximity to tide-water and the 
fact that the district is so situated, topographically, that the fluid will readily 
gravitate to the water front, resulting in a great saving in the cost of trans- 
portation. 

There is now every assurance that the Arroyo Grande field will soon take 
its place among the rich oil-producing districts of the State adding materially 
to its output. 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY IN THE SANTA MARIA FIELD. 



The Recruit Oil Company, a subsidiary of the Associated, has encountered 
a rich oil-bearing stratum at a depth of i2.7i"> feet, in its well being drilled on 
the Escolle lease in the Santa Maria field. The formation has been drilled 
into 200 feet, and there is every indication of its being a big producer. 

A well drilled by this company on tic NTewhall lease, next adjoining, 
struck the oil formation at practically the same depth as did the Escolle 
well, passing through more than a thousand feet of very productive oil sand 
and shale and into the water formation below. The well was lost on this 
account, and because the casing collapsed, ruining what would otherwise 
been a very large producer. On the other side of the Escolle lease a well 
was drilled with practically the same results, being lost by passing into the 
water formation and by the easing collapsing. However, it may be said to 
have fully proven up the territory, as it a Ism passed through moi 
thousand feet of oil formation; the two wells establishing the depth at which 
the oil may be expected to be encountered, the thickness of the oil formation, 
and the water level. As the wells were purely test wells, the desired results 
were obtained and future development in the surrounding territory should be 
successful. A very large area was also proven up. 

The Recruit Oil Company owns a very large acreage in the Santa M3ria 
field proper, and on the Lompoc anticline, which, in reality, is simply the 
southern part of the Santa Maria field. Practical I 
part of it to be oil bearing, and extensive development will doubtl 
ried on on it from this time on, as the company may require the oil. 



6 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



A GENERAL REVIEW OF THE OIL SITUATION. 

By L. E. BLOCHMAN. 



Rapid Rise in Prices in the Los Angeles Market. — Lack of Transportation 

Facilities a Growing Menace to Consumers and Producers. — The Remedy 

Suggested. 

Prices on oil supplies for the eity are soaring high. The city is con- 
fronted with the proposition that it either must secure tankage and store 
oil at once for use during the ensuing year or it must expect to have to pay 
a largely increased price for this material later on. The indication is that 
the price will be almost 100 per cei.t over prices paid by the city at present. 

Bids were opened recently by the Board of Public Works for supplying 
the city 30,000 barrels, more or less, of oil to be delivered from April to July 
of next year. Only two bids were received, and the award was postponed 
for further consideration. 

These bids indicate a strong rise in the oil market. The fact that there 
were only two bidders also would seem to indicate that oil producers are not 
anxious to quote prices for delivery at a period several months in advance. 

The John K. Ott Company proposed to furnish the city 30,000 barrels 
of oil of not less than 55 per cent asphalt, to be sprinkled upon the streets at 
any point within the city limits, at a rate of 99 cents per barrel of forty-two 
gallons each; and 5,000 barrels of oil containing not less than 70 per cent 
asphalt, at a rate of $1.05 per barrel. 

The C. C. Harris Oil Company offered to furnish the 30,000 barrels of the 
first grade mentioned at a rate of 94 cents per barrel, and the 5,000-barrel lot 
at a rate of 99 cents per barrel. 

The city at the present time is paying 55 to 60 cents per barrel for the 
oil used in street work. A jump of prices to nearly double these figures 
causes the Board of Public "Works to pause and inquire into conditions. It 
is possible the board will endeavor to secure storage and purchase oil at the 
prevailing rate at present and thus avoid paying the high price asked for fu- 
ture deliveries. 

The last contract made by the Board of Public Works for oil for street 
work was closed about two months ago. For that lot but 50 cents per barrel 
was paid but this price was for delivery at the tanks. At that time Mrs. 
Emma Summers, the "Oil Queen," was before the board and advised that 
body to purchase, all the oil it needed at the price mentioned. — Los Angeles 
Times. 

In citing the above we are not jubilating over the oil situation as much 
as this optimistic bit of news uiight justify. We do not believe that these 
high prices for future oil deliveries are justified by conditions in the field. 
The demand for oil is increasing daily — that is true — and that factor would 
lend some justification to high prices. But producers in the San Joaquin 
fields are not to any proportionate extent feeling this boom in prices, not 
even in the more favored Santa Maria fields, close to tidewater, is this 
boom in prices adequately felt. What, then, is the reason of these high 
prices for future oil contracts around Los Angeles? The total inadequacy 
of transportation facilities. This is not a mere statement, but a realizing 
fact. 

We are hardly realizing how this state of affairs is growing. Los Angeles 
alone has, for instance, gained almost 100,000 inhabitants since the census 
of 1900. And this is not a boom statement, but the school census, and the recent 
Great Register is the evidence. Industries have increased and the demand 
for supplies of all kinds have increased. Farming lands are producing better 
and more varied crops. Increased irrigation has also added to the sum of 
production. Manufactories and mill products have been made possible by the 
cheapening of fuel by the adequate oil supply. 

We were really surprised in a recent visit to the south by these increasing 
manufacturing industries. Way down in San Diego we noticed three iron 
founderies running day and night, several planing mills and other manufac- 
tures. With all this increase in population, in farm and mill products; in 
export and import demands, no new line of railroad nor any added steamer 
lines have been built. True, railroads have increased their rolling stock a 
great deal; but since the great San Francisco conflagration, with its greatly 
increased demands for all kinds of goods, building materials and every form 
of supplies from the East, from the North and the South, the congestion of . 
freight is an actual realization. How, then, is the transportation of fuel oil 
not to suffer if it is to be transported by rail? It is all but self-evident that 
oil would suffer most from inadequate rail transportation facilities. And this 
is at bottom the main cause of the rapid lise iu prices of oil at ce'rtain centers, 
much more so than enhanced demand. 

For all this there is only one remedy: Oil must be pipe-lined to the seashore 
and transported by barges or tank steamers to points of delivery along water 
routes and pipe lined inland again where large centers of demand justify it. 
We must come down to further pipe-lining oil to the coast to put the oil 
business on a stable commercial basis. The Standard Oil Company realized 
this long ago when it put its line down the San Joaquin valley; only it made 
the error of going down the San Joaquin instead of crossing to the coast to 
Port Harford; they since found it necessary at the Coalinga field to cross to 
tide water at Monterey. It has required over twenty-five pumping stations 



at a cost of millions to pump the oil along the almost gradeless interior valley. 
As a result, transportation facilities by the valley pipe line have been inade- 
quate to take care of the field without immense storage tanks. And this very 
storage has been held up as a menace to producers. 

The East has long been thoroughly convinced that its oils must be 
pipe-lined to water shipping points, even if it takes hundreds of miles of pipe 
lines to accomplish it. Rail facilities, as we have shown and as every one 
knows, 'are totally inadequate; the little adequacy it can afford is given to 
favored corporations; a matter that the Federal Government is right now 
investigating. The San Joaquin valley oils will have to be piped across to 
the coast to get a paying market. Now that prices are higher, the under- 
taking would pay them better than ever; provided, they united in securing 
and using it. This extra supply of fuel oil is just what the market urgently 
needs. And we would say to those more favored localities on the coast as 
we are that the adeocacy of this placing more oil on the market is a judicious 
one. To keep oil at such high prices as futures in the Los Angeles field are 
tending to, will ultimately create a reaction with far lower prices. The re- 
action will be brought about by two different factors. High prices of oil 
will encourage a very rapid further development of oil in fields not hitherto 
touched, and will tend to leave present Kern field storage supplies still on 
hand. The best interests of the oil business are served when every field can 
find a ready and steady market and does not have to store any surplusses. 
Again, only gradual and legitimate enlargement of the field will ensue when 
prices are not forced up too quickly. 

Then, there is another situation to be considered, high prices of fuel oil 
prevent the rapid further use of oil — the whole manufacturing industries of 
Southern Califdrnia depend on oil fuel. Oil at a reasonable figure. Oil has 
really been too low in the past but if it tends to the other extreme, fluctua- 
tions discourage manufactories and will encourage electrical power transmitted 
from distant water sources. It is to be hoped that oil deliveries will catch 
up with demands in the growing South. New oil wells of a very light gravity 
are just recently coming in between the Fullerton and Whittier districts, but 
the territory is a deep one, and it takes a deal of time to develop the field. 

The sum total of it all is there is no scarcity of oil in the State — there 
is ample — if it only could be more rapidly delivered to the large populous 
centers. The demand has increased and will steadily increase if fluctuations 
in prices do not injure the stability of the demand. 



COALINGA. 



Staff Correspondence. 

Following are the field, statistics for the Coalinga field for the month of 
October: 

"Wells drilling 17 Daily production 17,225 

Wells producing 263 Production for the month. . . .535,975 

Wells shut down 43 Shipments by pipe Jines 508,335 

We-lls finished 7 Shipments by rail 27,640 

Derricks up 6 

The California and New York Oil Company is preparing to house its 
new boiler plant. Its property is doing very good work, having more oil 
this month than it did last. Its well No. 1 continues to do its usual good work 
and can well be classed as one of the best producers in the field. Its well 
No. 2 has been cleaned out and is back on its old production again. No. 3 
has greatly increased in its production and is a very good well. Well No. 4 
just completed, is a very good producer, and bids fair to be as good as No. 1. 

The California Monarch Oil Company's well No. 1 made its usual flow of 
oil on Monday last, making a good amount of oil in a short time. Its No. 
4 has been cleaned out and is producing again. No. 14 (its drilling well) has 
its water shut off and has carried down its 6% casing to a depth of 2,470 
feet. All its other wells are doing very good work. 

The California Diamond Oil Company's wells Nos. 1 and 2 (at Sunset) 
continue to be very good producers. No. 3 (in this field) is a very good pro- 
ducer, and is producing a good amount of oil. No. 5, its drilling well, has 
landed its 12y 2 -inch casing at 1,260 feet, and is putting in its 10-incli. Very 
good time has been made on this well, showing that it pays to have a good 
outfit and good drillers. 

Mr. J. F. Torma of Seattle, Washington, and N. B. McKenney of Green- 
wich, Conn., spent several days last week looking over the California and New 
York, the California Diamond and the California Monarch and other companies 
in the field. They went away very much pleased with the large and pros- 
perous field. 

Mr. C. C. Spinks and brother and Mr. H. H. Hart closed a deal with 
Messrs. Cameron & Craig recently, whereby they sell their interest in the 
Sauer Dough Oil Company, amounting to 150,000 shares, for $300,000. Mr. 
Spinks has resigned his position as general manager and Mr. Clarence Sperry 
is to take his place. 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



ipany polled ita I B well, and is going 

to drill through to th Its old using will be replaced 

with well is doing good work. 

well So. l is doing much better than it did 
making v.rv little water and, a good amount of oil. 

Twenty-Eight Oil Company has its well No. 5 down 1,300 feel in si\ inch 

drive pipe and i oil. 

The M. K- .- ompany's well Mo. i is down 1,080 feel in its 18- 

ineh easing, and is having I i. This casing is is inches in diameter, 

with .collars one inch thick. What there is in the hole now weighs fifty one 
tons. It is intended to pnl in about 1,900 feel of this pipe, if possible, then 
to follow it with a string of 15-incb of equal thickness. This well, when 
completed, will be the largest well in diameter ever drilled in this country. 
Mr. IhiLong. the manager, is repairing the roads in the field and has already 
used over 4,000 barrels of oil on them. Owing to the Bcarcity of teams, it 
has been very hard to get the oil hauled for this work. 

The Westmoreland Coalings < >il Company has its rig up for its No. 4 
well. Its No. :; well is making 600 barrels a day. 

The Pittsburg ' iil Company has its rig up i'or its well No. 3. 

Its wells Nos. 1 and 2 are very good producers. 

The Missouri Coalinga oil Company's well No. 1 is doing very good work. 

The Manchester Oil Company spudded in its well No. 1 last Thursday and 
is making good progress. 

The Associated is hauling tin 1 pipe for a pipe line from the Sauer Dough 
to its east side station. 

The Pittsburg Oil Company has its well No. 1 down 2, MUD feet. A new 
string ..f six-inch special easing is being put in. which will be followed by a 
string of 4%-inch, which will be carried into tin- sand. 

The ferra Oil Companv has its well No. 3 down 800 feet in its 12V>-inch 
casmg. 

The Pacfic Oil and Transportation Company has finished its well No. 3 
and has a good producer. Its well No. 1 is doing very nicely. The casing 
has been pulled at its well No. 2 and a test is being made to see if the water 
is shut off. Its derrick is up for its well No. 4 and work will be commenced at 
once. 

The Coalinga Peerless Oil Company has its No. 11 well finished and on 
the pump. This well bids fair to be a good producer. Two new cottages 
have been put up south of the cook house. Its boiler plant is practically 
finished. 

A new string of casing has been put in the Caribou Oil Company's well 
No. 11, and it is expected that it will be numbered among the producers in 
the near future. Grading is being done for its No. 13 rig and the lumber is 
being hauled out. Its No. 10 well is doing very good work. 

The California Oilfields, Limited, well No. 24 commenced to flow on Mon- 
day night and on Tuesday, when our representative was at the well, it was 
making about 100 barrels an hour. The company is selling its oil to the 
Associated on a small contract. 

The Stockholders' Oil Company has its well No. 5 down 700 feet in its 
9%-inch casing, and good progress is being made. Mr. Koberts, its manager, 
is staying at the lease while the drilling is being done. 

The Hanford Oil Company has its derrick rebuilt at its well No. 6 and 
is cleaning out and repairing the well. 



The Wabash Oil Company's well No. 7 lias been completed at a little. 

over 1,500 foot and is Bowing bettor than any other on the li 

Th.. Independence oil Company, which in i > had a liner fish. 

has had a now- string of pipe put in and is ouco again the best Well mm the 

lease, its No. ti well is being cleaned and is expected to be producing 

again soon. 

iiio BTaweah oil Company's well No. 2 has had considerable trouble in 

drilled in. but is now producing almost as good as its No. I. 

The Confidence Oil Company is pumping on daylight shifts for the present. 
The New San Francisco Crude Oil Company commenced November 1st 
to pump on daylight shifts. 

The Coalinga Petroleum Company has its derrick up for its well No. 3, 
and will commence rigging up soon. 

The S. W. & B. Oil Company has shut down its two wells for repairs. 

Section Seven Oil Company is pulling rods and cleaning its well No. 3, 
and expect to have it producing soon. 

The Coalinga Pacific Oil Company has all its wells producing and have 
a much better production than ever before. Its well No. 4 is doing very good 
work. 

Bunting & Brix Oil Company has bailed out its well No. 1 and put it on 
the pump. It is selling its oil to the Associated' Oil Company. 

The Union Oil Company is repairing up its boiler plant and will erect 
two new toilers of a larger capacity. It is reported that this work is being 
done in order to ship its oil through its own line to Ora station. A new cot- 
tage has been put up for the use of the superintendent. Its No. 9 well has 
not been finished as yet. 

The Coalinga Western Oil Company is building a large sump to store its oil. 

The Kern Trading & Oil Company has finished its No. 2 well, and in twen- 
ty-four hours after it had flowed 1,500 barrels, and is still doing good work. 
Preparations are being made to finish up its No. 1 well and it is thought that 
this will be as good. Nos. 1 and 3 on Section 31-19-15 are producing, and 
No. 2 is being repaired. 

The Shreves Oil Company is down 1,700 feet in its eight-inch easing. Un- 
usually good time has been made on this well, and it will soon be numbered 
among the producers. 

The Commercial Petroleum Company spudded in for its No. 9 well last 
week, and is down 250 feet. This well is situated on its property on Section 
12-21-14, about one mile from the Lucile, and a good well ought to be brought in. 

The Esperanza Oil & Land Company has its water well completed and 
the lumber on the ground for its No. 1 well. 

The West Coalinga Oil Company has finished rigging up for its No. 1 
well, and will commence drilling soon. 

The Lucile Oil Company's well No. 1 is producing about 600 barrels a day. 

We are glad to note that Cheney Brothers, who bought out the City Liv- 
ery Stable a few weeks ago, have put in some good teams and are sending 
out only first-class rigs. 

Bunting Iron Works has built a new supply house and is going to put 
up a new boiler shop with all the latest machinery in anticipation of the 
increased business that the newly proven territory will bring them. 



Exports of Domestic Mineral Oil From the Pacific Ports of the United States and Shipments to Alaska and 

Hawaii During August, 1906. 



CUSTOMS DISTRICTS 
AND COUNTRIES 


MINERAL OIL 
CRUDE 




MINERAL OIL, REFINED OR MANUFACTURED 




NAPHTHAS 


ETC. 


ILLUMINATING 


LUBRICATING, ETC. j RESIDUUM, ETC. 


Domestic Exports— 


Gallons 


Dollars 


Gallons 

4.290 
2,670 


Dollars 

SS9 
344 

2,689 


Gallons 

6.S46 

485 

. 775 

2.7S6.839 


Dollars 

T ,3 fi O 
79 

142 

101,966 


Gallons 

792 

12,632 

66 

I6.I93 


Dollars Gallons 


Dollars 


. Puget Sound 


210,000 


4,000 






40 683 


4* 




I.IOO 


-'4 


11,858 




Total Domestic 


211, IOO 


4.024 


18.818 


3.922 


2.794,945 


103,547 


29.683 7.507 : 6S3 


41 


Shipments to Alaska — 




. 


27.397 ! 5.045 
990 90 


37.630 
390 


8,186 

45 


5,688 
5Sl 


2,286 ! 




" San Francisco 




















Shipments to Hawaii — 










3.300 
6,096 








3,330,000 


S4,ooo 


iS.iSo 


2.15° 


140,100 


22,374 













PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER. 



Quite a lot of excitement is shown about the territory south of town and 
on October 22d the train for Stanford carried out about twenty that were 
going to Visalia to file homesteads on land that lies in Township 22, Range 
16, and south of there. 

We notice a much more cheerful feeling among the producers and it is 
thought by nearly every one that the price for oil will soon be better. It 
is rumored that several small contracts have been let at a much better price 
than has been paid for some time. 

The Associated Oil Company has bought the house formerly occupied by 
Mr. Robertson, and is repairing it' up for the use of its superintendent. 



SOUTHERN FIELDS. 

Special Correspondence. 

The Salt Lake, or Amalgamated, field is probably. the liveliest spot in the 
State at the present time. The present production of this field is not far 
from 8,000 barrels per day. As to extending its territory, the company shows 
considerable confidence in the great extent of the field, and at present seems 
to be branching out in a northeasterly direction. Kigs are being built at 
least a mile and a half in advance of present producing wells. 

A new company has commenced operations in the Salt Lake field, and 
intend to fully develop a large tract directly east and north of the Clarke 
and Sherman property. It is called the Rancho Brea Oil Company, and it is 
understood that the Hancocks, from whom the Associated lease their land, 
are back of the concern. 

A. F. Gilmore, the Westland Oil Company and Clarke and Sherman have 
all put in extra strings in their different properties in order to increase their 
production as soon as possible. 

"Dollar oil " is not only a possibility, but a probility of the near future 
in the southern markets. In fact, a recent request for bids by Los Angeles 
city last week for oil met with bids of 99 cents and $1.04 per barrel. On 
a former contract the city was paying 57 cents, and now the city dads are 
"wondering why." They have deferred action in the^ matter and are again 
discussing the proposition of the city buying its own wells. While they 
wait, however, there may be another advance. The producers, down here, 
are confident of their position, and are determined to secure a decent price 
for their product, and now seems to be the accepted time. 

Right in line with the above, one of the big Whittier companies re- 
cently refused to make a contract for 10,000 barrels per month at 70 cents, 
and 75 cents has been refused for oil in the same field within two weeks. 
Six months ago these same concerns were selling oil at 45 cents, and at the 
same time storing oil. There is not a drop of surplus oil in Whittier, or in 
any other southern field for that matter, and the demand is getting stronger 
every day. 

The Union Oil Company has a rig up in the Coyote hills, adjoining the 
property of the Murphy Oil Company, and will begin drilling operations at 
once. While the possible output of the new well drilled by the Murphy Oil 
Company has never been determined and is not known, yet it has made a 
good enough showing to warrent something of a flurry in land values in 
that vicinity. It is said that the Murphy Oil Company paid $30 an acre 
for the land it owns here, and can now sell it for $2,000 an acre. Most of 



the territory in the neighborhood has been picked up, and if present indica- 
tions amount to anything, a lively little field will probably be opened up here. 

Brea canyon has become a busy spot within the past month, and four 
different concerns are drilling and several others are making preparations 
to drill. The Fullerton Oil, Brea Canyon, Graham, Loftus and Menges Oil 
companies are all putting down wells and the Union is getting ready to put 
on another string of tools at once. There is some talk of the Edison Oil 
Company resuming operations here after a shut down of about three years. 

The Columbia Oil Company's well at Olinda is not yet finished. The sand 
continues to show up so well that drilling is continued. The depth at present 
is 2,850 feet, and it is with difficulty that the drill is kept going, owing to 
the gas pressure. There will certainly be "something doing" in a few days 
in this neighborhood. 

The Central Oil Company's test well is down 1,500 feet in S^-inch easing. 
Nothing new has developed recently, except that oil and gas in small quan- 
tities continue to be encountered. The well is being watched closely by 
prospectors with a view to securing land adjoining if anything big develops. 

The Brea Development Company is the name of a new concern recently 
organized to drill in the Salt Lake field, west of Los Angeles. The owners 
are the Hancocks, from whom the Associated lease all the land it is operating 
on in this field. The material has been purchased and drilling will be begun 
shortly. 

Mr. A. F. Gilmore has purchased material for three new wells, which 
will be drilled as soon as possible. Gilmore No. 5 is now about 1,200 feet in 
depth. The sand is expected at about 1,800 feet. No. 6 is located on the 
north line, and is about 500 feet in advance of anything in the field. 

At Fullerton. 

The Salt Lake field will be second in the race in point of development 
work, if things continue to boom at Fullerton as they have for two or three 
months past, There is no doubt but that the Fullerton field is destined to be 
one of the largest and most prolific fields in the State. It is only within the 
past six months that this field has been considered much more than a second- 
rate pool, but developments during that time has changed the opinion entirely. 
The size of the wells and the extent of territory shown to be rich in oil 
warrants the statement that there is no field in the southern part of the 
State at least that is in the same class. The Union Oil Company has evidently 
decided that this is so, for this company is preparing to do an immense amount 
of development work, and is building rigs as fast as the rig builders can get 
to the work. This is not so only with the Union. Every other concern in 
the field is doing the same thing, and at present there are at least a dozen 
new rigs in sight. In speaking of the Fullerton field, of course, the intention 
is to include the Brea Canyon pool, and there is no doubt but that a con- 
tinuous line of well will soon be drilled along the ridge connecting the two 
present points of developed territory. 

The latest sensation in the field is the Columbia Oil Company 's No. 13. It 
was finished at 2,880 feet, after having gone through 800 feet of good oil 
sand. The well is not yet producing steadily, but it will no doubt be at 2,000- 
barrel producer on the start-off. Rig for No. 14 is up and work will be begun 
at once on the drilling. 



pSSSS^SSSSSSSSSSSSSS^^ 



I 












Carry in Stock a Complete Line of 

OIL COUNTRY TUBULAR GOODS 
DRILLING RIGS and OIL WELL SUPPLIES 



Bakersfield 



Los Angeles 



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^S^* 85 * 5 *^®* 85 ^^^ 



PACIFIC MINING & Oil. RKPORTKR 



KERN COUNTY. 

refield, Cal., Oot 80, mum;. 
-fill and conservative canvas of the Kern river field, including a 
three-quarters of tin' total number of pumping srells 
parties during the laal six weeks, gives the total pro- 

on per day ven close t<» 3S, >. \ good manj wells in the field are 

shut down temporarily on ac ml of the amounl of oil I delivered by 

than the full capacity <>t' the wells. The production of 

.11 the way from 28,000 barrels daily up to 10,000, but 

the real figures are within very few barrels of the amounl as above stated. 

is I. ring taken by the Associated Oil Company from the Independent 

njy to the amount that is shipped oul by tin- Associated. 

The Independents could deliver mors »>ii than they do to the Associated, but 

the present prio cents per barrel seems to be more than thej are 

willing to pay t"'»r oil to put in storage. 

Somi' of tin- oil is going into storage, practically all the oil bought by 
the Standard Oil Company on its contracts is thus disposed of. Shipments 
by the Standard, either by pipe line or rail, cut very little figure in the 
total amount of shipments. 

A large amount of oil is being us.-.l by tin- numerous refineries in the 
field. The market for tin' byproducts and asphalt turned out by the re- 
fineries is in excess of the present capacity of tin- refineries. For three years 
refinori«'S found it difficult to dispose of their product at ;i price that would 
enable them to run without a loss, but during the last year a great change 
has come over tin- business, until, at the present time, every refinery in the 
field finds it possible to dispose of its entire product at a price that allows 
a small profit over the actual expense of keeping the stills running. 

Sunset and Midway. 

The Sunset and Midway oil fields are practically shut down. The pro- 
ducers of heavy road oil in the Sunset field have large amounts of oil in 
storage, all of which they have sale for if they were able to obtain cars 
to ship in, but the railroad company claims it is impossible to furnish cars 
to the number demanded by the shippers. Whether this is on account of 
collusion with the lug buyers and shippers of oil, as claimed by the small pro- 
ducers, or as the railroads state, on account of there not being enough cars 
to furnish and the impossibility of getting cars made fast enough by the 
tank-car builders to keep pace with ever-increasing demands, is a question 
for those intimately acquainted with conditions to decide. That the real 
conditions are the latter seem probable from the complaint of the Associated 
Oil Company that it is unable to secure cars for its own shipments. If there 
was any actual collusion it would stand to reason that the Associated, through 
its friendly relations with the Southern Pacific would be enabled to secure 
all the cars needed, wdiile the small shipper would get. none at all, but the 
small shipper seems to get his proportion. 

Until a law is passed in California, similar to the one in Texas, where 
the transportation companies are forced to furnish ears as many as may be 
ordered under a penalty of $25 per day for each car demanded and not fur- 
nished, which repays the shippers for any loss they may suffer from inability 
to ship. The law works both ways, and compels the shipper who orders cars 
and does not use them to pay the transportation company the same amount 
of demurrage. This does away with a practice that, since the shortage of cars 
in the oil fields, has become prevalent with the shipper; that of ordering more 
ears than he really needs, to bo sure of getting the number he actually has 
to have. The claim is made by the railroad companies that they MUST use 
all cars available for filling up their own storage to prevent any possibility 
of running short on fuel. This is a very good and reasonable excuse, for 
self-preservation is the first law of nature, and the transportation companies 
must look out for themselves, no matter what becomes of the shippers. A 
law similar to the Texas law would provide a sufficiency of cars or force the 
railroads to pay back to the shipper the loss sustained by them by the rail- 
road's short-sightedness in failing to provide for the demand made upon 
them by the ever-increasing oil business. 

Conditions like the above would do a great deal in lessening the present 
continually made and unproved claims of collusiou between the railroads and 
big buyers and shippers of oil. If the production was actually more than 
the demand and there was more oil for sale than demanded it would soon 
be proven and the same proof would come to the light if the demand actually 
exceeded the supply. 

The small producer claims he could sell all his oil at a much higher price 
that the Standard or the Associated offer him if the railroads would only 
furnish him cars. While the big companies say the production is in excess 
of the demand, and they will not buy oil to store and trust to the future 
increase in price. 

The production of the Kern river field will not totally disappear for a 
great many years. Even now there is a great deal of territorv that can 
develop oil. Nearly every producing company in the field has more or less 
territory that can be developed if the indications point to an increased price 
for oil and the certainty of delivery on contracts made by the producer of oil. 



Have you seen our 

CALIFORNIA DIAMOND BX 

Casing and Drive Pipe? It's the 
thing for deep wells. Made in fol- 
lowing sizes and weights, and 
carried in stock at all our stores 



c^si:ivo 



Size 


Weight 


Size 


Weight 


5^ inches 


20 lbs. 


95/8 inches 


33 lbs 


6*4 inches 


20 lbs. 


1 1 5/8 inches 


40 lbs 


65/6 inches 


20 lbs. 


12^ inches 


40 lbs 


8^4 inches 


28 lbs. 








DRIVE 


I*II»E^ 






Size 


Weight 






4^£ inches 


15 lbs 





THE NATIONAL SUPPLY COMPANY 

117 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 



BRANCH STORES 



Coalinga, Cal. Bakersfield, Cal. Orcutt, Cal. 



TUBULAR BOILERS 



Large Dome 
Dry Steam 
Assured 
Full 
Capacity 




Easy access 

to every 

part for 

Cleaning, 

Examination 

and 

Repairs 



Stock of Boilers from 25 fi, p, to BO h. p, on hand for immediate deli»ery 

Made of best Flange Tested Steel. Tubes of best American manufacture and o 
standard gauge; Rivets of best quality; Fixtures heavy and durable. Every 
boiler complete, including" following fixtures and fittings: Half arch front, com- 
plete with fire and ash doors 17x17 inches, with draft dampers ; anchor holts 
for front gates and bearers; rear arch bars ; cleanout door and frame; wall, 
plates and rollers ; smoke stack and guy wire; pop safety valve; steam gange 
and syphon; water column of large capacity, complete with water gauge and 
three gauge cocks ; blow-off cock; feed valve and check valve with nipples. 
Portable outfits and everything required for drilling or boring; 
Test Wells. Brass Goods, Fittings and valves of all descriptions. 



Write for prices 



R. H. H EH RON CO., affiliated with the 

OIL WELL SUPPLY CO. 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

212 North Los Angeles St. 



SAX FRANCISCO. CAL. 
Ill Townsend St. 



IO 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPO RTE R 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



Published Semi-Monthly 



The Oil and Mining Authority o£ the Pacific Coast 



EDWARD S. EASTMAN 
MARIA R. WINN 
KARL R. EASTMAN 



Managing Editor 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Field Manager 



OFFICE AND EDITORIAL ROOMS 

Suite 37 Saint Mungo Building, 1300 Golden Gate Avenue 

San Francisco, California 

TELEPHONE WEST 6677 



Subscription price, $2.00 per year, in advance, to any part of the United States, Canada 
or Mexico. Add $1.00 for foreign subscriptions. 

Entered at the post-office at San Francisco under application for second-class matter. 



EXPANSION. 



Commencing with this issue, the first number of volume eight, this journal 
will be known as the PACIFIC MINING & OIL EEPOETEE, the change 
in name being for the purpose of enabling us to enlarge and improve upon 
the publication by including a thorough and efficient news service from the 
mining camps of the "West; maintaining at the same time our usual news service 
from the State's oil fields, which, in no manner, shall be neglected or slighted. 

First of all may come the inquiry of why do we wish to make this change, 
or why do we wish to include the oil and mining business in the same journal? 
We- will say in answer to all that it is, first, because there has always been 
urgent requests from those interested in both oil and mining for us to do so, 
and, second, because there is no real reason why there should be so strong a 
distinction between the "two" industries, which, in reality, are synonomous; 
both being literally and technically (( mining " in every sense of the word. 

In the PACIFIC MINING & OIL EEPOETEE our patrons will con- 
tinue to find the same reliable source of news and the same fair-dealing 
business methods of the past. We are not in the "grafting" business. All 
legitimate enterprises may use our advertising columns and will receive justice 
in our news columns. All others may not. We shall gradually increase the 
size of the journal shall employ the best writers of authority on oil and mining, 
and shall exert our best efforts at all times to promote the best interests of 
the oil and mining industry of the West. 

We trust our many patrons will concur with us in our policy of expansion. 

THE EDITOE. 



HIGH TIME FOB FACTS. 



One of the greatest existing evils in our California oil fields is the strong 
tendency to exaggeration on all matters pertaining to the industry. Oil com- 
panies, individually and collectively, still persist in giving out false reports 
of production, shipments, etc., all tending to misguide other producers — espe- 
cially small producers — with the result that we are getting further and further 
away from the desired end of better prices for our oil. 

If an oil producer in some one of our districts hears that the production 
of some other field is falling off rapidly he believes it — believes it because 
it pleases him and not because he has any real reasons for believing it. It 
appeals to him — is just the information he 'wants. He knows that he would 
personally profit by such a condition. In all probability it is not true, but 
that makes no difference, he is not after the truth, he wants to hear of that 
which will benefit himself and hurt the other fellow. So he gloats. He is 
animated anew. And he goes directly to his next lease neighbor and beamingly 
animated anew. And he goes directly to his lease neighbor' and beamingly 
conveys to him the latest piece of gossip, which thus continues to go the 
rounds of brainless, selfish exaggeration. 

Then the small producer goes straightway and gets busy. He puts his 
wells in better producing condition ; drills more wells and makes a noise like 
dollar oil. But the noise does not work. He gets no more for his oil — 
may possibly be offered less. His increased production together with that of 
hundreds of others who have conducted themselves likewise has dissipated 
all likelihood of any immediate change in affairs. His fondest hopes have 
been blasted, but he probably never realizes that he had no cause to expect a 
change in conditions unless he did his share in bringing them about. 

In every field there is a calamity cryer, in most fields a score of them. 
It is their principal aim in life to decry the situation and blame somebody 
for it. And much of the dissatisfaction now existing is due to these ill- 
omened personages who continue to delight in their particular hallucination. 

As a matter of fact, the days of vicissitude in the California oil fields is 
practically over. The recent large contracts with Japan and Chile, together 
with numerous other smaller but generous contracts, puts the oil business at 
once on a very stable basis and prices in the future should be much stronger 
than in the past. But it is folly to expect an unreasonable price for any 
commodity, and it would be particularly injurious to the trade to advance the 
price of oil to a figure that would curtail its uses. A fair price is all that 
can be asked or expected, and natural conditions already assure that. 

With adequate transportation facilities, the ability to secure cars in which 
to ship the oil, and the -great and growing demand for the same, we are confi- 
dent that the halcyon days in the oil business are now at hand. 



MINING STOCKS BOOMING. 



Great excitement prevails on the mining exchanges of this city, the like 
of which has not been seen since the bonanza days of yore. Great crowds 
of men, women, and even children, fill the hallways, crowding their way to 
the front in an endeavor to gain the latest bit of information concerning some 
favored stock. On the Board there is a lively scramble among the brokers 
to fill their multidutinous orders on the advancing market. 

Nevada stocks are in the lead and the clamor of spectators shouting their 
orders, together with the good-natured fight among the brokers to fill them 



Hammond 
Iron Works 

Warren, Pa, 

U. S. A. 



Builders of 

Steel Tanks 

of the 

Highest 

Grade 




Stills 
Oondensors 
Agitators 
General 
Oil Refinery- 
Work 



SALES AGENTS 

Herman Nieter 

29 Broadway 
New York. 

Krumbhaar&Aiken 

201 Defiegre Building 
New Orleans 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



i r 



It reminds the oldtimers of the halcyon -i 
Francisco. 
l'r:i. ti.iilly :ii: ha have advanced materially dui 

in siimii- instances amounting to more than 

t, llohawk, for iaatai which was s.-llint: around -t<4 "ii the 15th 

and wlii<-!< go went bogging at 30 cents, is now Btro 

(lustration. Comstocks, Tonopaus, Manhattans and, in 
worthy stock lias made tremendous gains, and fortunes have 
already been made in trading in them. 

i these advances are, for the most part, on merit alone. They are 

worthy mini's ami arc worth every dollar they arc soiling 

iffering great opportunities for big returns. Many of the mines already 

have sufficient on blocked out to keep up the present rate of dividends for 

many 

During the period immediately following the fire in San Francisco all 
Western stocks. 'industrial, commercial ami mining, fell to the very minimum. 
Not through the worth of the securities having decreased, but solely because 

money was uncertain. Thousands of men who had formerly invested heavily 
were reduced to very uncertain financial circumstances, and those who hold 
stock of any nature threw it on the market at any price to provide funds for 
the exigencies of the time. The exchanges were completely demoralized and 
The future was uncertain. Financial conditions having now gained their 
normal condition, stable securities are being sought with the result that all 
will reach their normal value consistent with the worth of the prop- 

I, which have doubled, trebled and quadrupled since the panic, days 
of the unfortunate catastrophe of our Western Metropolis. 

There is no more safe or attractive security than the stock of a worthy 
mining company. Millions of dollars are lying idle in our banks at ridiculously 
low rates of interest, which could be most profitably invested in this manner. 
Bankers are. almost universally, great investors in mining securities, but 

I invariably make a most strenuous effort to dissuade their depositors 
from making a like investment. The reason for this is plain. If the de- 

irs should iuvest in ruining stocks it would take away the source of 

ankers' income, through which they make their own profitable ventures. 
Investors who are quick to see and take advantage of the opportunities 
of the present time will reap untold profits iu the great advances in practi- 
cally every meritorious stock which is now selling on the San Francisco ex- 
changes. Many a lost fortune will be recuperated, and many a burned 
home will be rebuilt from the profits of wise investments. No one thing 
will play so important a part in the rebuilding of San Francisco. What was 
so true of the past will again be repeated. The quotations of to-day will 
doubtless seem ridiculously low a few months hence, and while some are 
telling of the fortunes they have made others will be telling of those that 
might have been made. 



THE RUSH TO WALKER RESERVATION. 



The rush of fortune seekers to the Walker Indian reservation is practi- 
cally over, and the same revolting scenes have been re-enacted that have 
many times before disgraced a nation. Armed men fought for claims already 
selected in abeyance of the law, the law-abiding citizen sharing slimly in the 
mad scramble of cut-throats, gun-fighters and desperadoes. All regard of the 
law was thrown aside and the time set for opening the reservation utterly dis- 
regarded. The Indian police were bribed and intoxicated, with the result 



that hundreds ol 

1 hour, much to the dis| irrived only 

[to [{i o ■ ! h i 

1,1 1 « :ls - : irtunately, ■ ha i e i r, repot ted 

Thai th ndreds of I m ■ el the Walket 

an be little doubt, but the} n rro I ulbj irvi ed bj fa' on d om 

in full po isi the 

:! " ■' ! I l!! -■ d I lial leveral Di , Uniti d States Surveyors, s ■ i be 

P "■ arveying the n a, were at g the i . and, being in 

a position to know just whore to look for the best, go! it. and then held il 
at the point of :i gun. 

The whole fault lies with the total disregard of i lie Government to pro 

vide means of enforcing the law at such a time. In this, as in most of the 
previous land openings in this country, there wire no troops uu hand to meet 
the exigencies of the event; i he whole policing of the borders being lefl to 
fourteen Indians, who have as much regard for the law as a cat has for a 
Hag. A company of mounted regulars should have been provided to guard 
the borders of the reservation until the signal was given for the opening. 
But past lessons have been of naught, and it is probable that in the opening 
of reservations in the future will lie attended with the same revolting scenes 
that have characterized that of the Walker reservation. 



JAPANESE CONSUL REPORTS BIG OIL CONTRACTS. 



According to a report from Consul Miller of Yokohama three of the leading 
oil companies of California, viz.: Uuion Oil Company, Los Angeles; Associated 
Oil Company of Sau Francisco, and Graciosa Oil Company of California, and 
the Toyo Kisen Kaisha (Oriental Steamship Company) of Japan, for the 
delivery of 500,000 barrels of crude oil per annum for ten years. It is under- 
stood that this oil is to be used as fuel for various Japanese steamers. It 
is further intimated that still greater oil transactions have been inaugurated 
by Henry Crocker of California in connection with prominent Japanese and 
with the Graciosa Oil Company. As a result it is expected that three large 
refineries will be erected in Japan, one at Yokohama, one at Kobe, and another 
at Moji. The new tariff gives a 20 per ceut duty on crude oil and a duty on 
refined oil of about 40 per cent. This difference in duty between the crude 
and refined oil, together with the market advantages for the by-products, 
makes a very comfortable working margin for the refineries located iu Japan. 
This very largo transaction in California oil will necessitate the operation of 
a line of tank steamers between California and Japan; and it is understood 
that contracts have been arranged for the construction in Japan, and the 
operation under the Japanese flag, of five large tank steamers for carrying 
this crude oil to Japanese refineries. This deal means a remarkable advantage 
to the California oil fields; but it will signify a great deal more for the Jap- 
anese merchant marine and for the industrial expansion of Japan. If the 
Japanese Government supports this new industrial development with the same 
national spirit that it gives to all other important enterprises it will result 
in the Government practically sustaining and assisting in the development of 
a great Japanese oil industry. The steamers for carrying this oil will be 
constructed under a Japanese subsidy, the industry will be further protected 
by a tariff and no doubt further aid will be given in transportation of the 
products into the markets of China, if it shall become necessary. — Mining 
and Engineering Review. 



J^iVOY MAIVXXF^O'FXJRIIVO COMPANY 



Manufacturers of 



Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet Iron 
Works 




Oil Well Casing 
Oil Stills 



OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 

Works: Cor. New Main and Date Streets, Baker Block P. O. Box 231, Station C. Telephone Main 196 

Office, 334 Horth ]VIain Street, Iios Angeles, Cal. 



12 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTED 



RICH STRIKES AT MANHATTAN. 

Manhattan, Nevada, Oct. 25, 1906. 
Special Correspondence : 

Another large vein has been tapped in the tunnel of the Georgey Group 
of the Manhattan Nevada Gold Mines Company at Central at a distance of 
200 feet in the hill. This new vein has been cross-cut twenty feet, and to 
date they are not yet through it. It pans fine colors clear across, and without 
a doubt will prove a bonanza. Drifting will be begun on this ledge as soon 
as the tunnel has passed it. Another shift has been added in the tunnel, and 
the two shifts will push work forward with all speed. 

Seven additional men have been put to work on the hill above in two of 
the shafts, where fine showings have already been obtained. In one of these 
shafts a cross-cut has been started at a depth of eighty feet to cut the eon- 
tact between the schist and porphyry, As excellent values are found on the 
surface, the company expects something big in this working. It is estimated 
that twenty feet will bring the work to the point desired. 

Four men have been added to the already large force of miners of the 
Manhattan Nevada Gold Mines Company, and are employed on the El Dorado 
group. A large, well-defined ledge cuts through this property for 3,000 feet, 
and pans well in free gold for the entire distance. On Saturday the men 
working on this ledge on the El Dorado No. 2 uncovered some very rich quartz 
which showed large quantities of free gold. A sbaft will be at once sunk 
on this spot, and the values opened up with all haste. 

The Manhattan Nevada Company now has twenty men on their payroll, 
and are in a position to erect a mill at once as soon as the ore bodies are 
opened up. Already high-grade milling ore has been opened in several places, 
and by the first of the year this company should be the leader of the district. 

A contract for 100 feet was just signed up for the^ continuance of the 
Mother Lode tunnel, which is now in the hill 17.5 feet. This tunnel is being 
driven to tap the large ledge which crops on the surface above the tunnel, 
and carries good values. Two additional men have been put on the surface 
to trench for hidden veins, and the first day rewarded the company by the 
opening up of a very fine quartz lead about a foot in width which pans well 
in free gold. The ledge will be further opened up before a shaft is sunk on it. 

This property lies alongside the famous Manhattan Consolidated, and 
without doubt has some of that company's rich ore bodies. The work will 
be pushed forward rapidly and a mine made of the property as soon as possi- 



ble. Already several veins have been cut in the tunnel that show up well, 
and from one of them assays were taken that ran into the hundreds of dol- 
lars to the ton. 



The cross-cut from the seventy-five-foot shaft on the property of the Man- 
hattan Cowboy Mining Company is in a distance of ninety-live feet, and the 
large dyke will be pierced within the next few feet, as the face is now in 
a mixture of lime and quartz, carrying considerable spar. Water has been 
struck in small quantities. Ore bodies that have been opened on the surface 
will be tapped under this dyke, and any day news of a rich strike in this 
working may be received. 

In shaft No. 2 on the Cowboy, the bottom is rapidly making ore, and 
within a few more feet a permanent high-grade milling proposition will un- 
doubtedly be opened up. Assays from this shaft show values from $7.00 to 
$52.00 per ton in gold and the ledge covers the entire bottom of the shaft. 

A contract was let a few days ago on the property of the Manhattan 
Express Mining Company, north of town, to sink the present shaft to a 
further depth of fifty feet. This will carry them through the heavy wash and 
into the solid formation. Several leads have been traced into the property 
from surrounding claims, so the company has an excellent prospect on which 
to work. 

On the Pine Hill claim, to the west, a large ledge was opened up which 
carried good gold and silver values, and can be traced directly into the 
Express ground. This 'ledge will be sought for at depth, as well as others 
from surrounding properties. Only a short distance to the south is the prop- 
erty of the Seyler Humphrey Gold Mining Company, which has the record 
of producing more spjecimen gold than any other mine in the camp. To the 
east is the Manhattan Standard Mining Company, which has pierced two 
large gold-bearing veins. In truth, the Manhattan Express is completely sur- 
rounded by properties of merit and should be amply rewarded by striking rich 
values at depth. 

Two strong ledges can be traced across the company's property from 
which values have been obtained, and these will be tapped by cross-cuts from 
the bottom of the shaft. A clean-cut contact between the schist and porphyry 
has been found on the property, which is an excellent indication of good 
values. The company will develop their property systematically so as to 
obtain the best results obtainable. 



Fortunes in a Few Days 



Have you good Nevada stocks? Have you reaped your share 
of the fortunes that have been made out of the good Nevada stocks 
in the past two weeks? We have had the greatest market here on 
the San Francisco Stock Exchanges ever known in the history of 
the mining business of this city. More shares have been dealt in 
each day than ever before. Some days a million to a million and 
a quarter shares are bought and sold. Stocks have advanced 5 
cents, 10 cents, 50 cents and in some cases as high as $2 per share 
per day. I have had a few customers who have become rich in the 
past few days. I have one old gray-beard that bought 1,000 shares 
of Mohawk about a year ago at 17 cents per share, or $170. I have 
repeatedly offered him by wire the past few days $15,000 spot cash 
for that 1,000 shares of stock. I just received a cable from Korea 
to sell 5,000 shares of Red Top at $4 per share, the market price. 
I sold this man that stock at a few cents a share about two years 
ago. Silver Pick has jumped from 20 cents to above $1.50. Jumbo, 
in the past few days, has gone to above $4; dozens of others have 
advanced to prices that have made fortunes for their holders, and 
the market lias just started. Why these prices? Because there are 
the most fabulous ore bodies behind these stocks; the actual bullion 
is coming from the mines and is being converted into gold dollars. 



The boom has just really begun in Goldfleld. Bullfrog has never 
had a boom, but the boom lightning is now striking in spots in 
that camp. A few stocks have already advanced 25 cents to 75 
cents a share. 

I know the mines, I know the men who control them, and I 
know the market. I know what to buy and as a result of this 
knowledge I have made for myself and my friends enormous profits 
on good Nevada stocks. 

If you have idle money, put it to work. If you have it in the 
bank, yon get about 3 or 4 per cent per year. We always make 
more than that every month, and the past few weeks have made a 
great many times that amount each week. I am a member of two 
Stock Exchanges, and can fill your orders promptly and satisfac- 
torily. During such a market as we have now, don't wait to write 
a letter, for stocks are constantly advancing and the delay oi a 
letter may cause you to pay a high price for your stock. 

As to my reliability, I refer you to the editor of this paper ; also 
the Germania National Bank of this city, also the California Safe 
Deposit and Trust Company; can give a number of other references 
if desired. 



J. E. KERR, Suite 2, 2597 Sutter Street 



Telephone WEST 6454 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



13 



AWAKENING OF NEVADA 



ago to believe thai Nevada would ever 

>l old time* when the stream of silver and gold pouring 

h k lo«le and the Eureka and Tuscarora mines made bu 

briak in every lit :<•! the fame of the State far and wide. The daj 

the ore "petered out" and so did the population, t'*»r the exodus 

Is set in until the State, i 11 1900, numbered onlj 12,335 

sity of population «:is then only 0.4 t«» the square mile, which 

i than in any other part of our domain excepting Alaska. 

In thai very year the wheel of fortune made ;t turn in tin- righl direction. 

Mr. .1 tutler, in April. L900, started southward with n string of bur- 

oaded with his camping outfit for :i prospecting tout in Nye county. 

of the present mining town of Tonopah he noticed ledges 

of white quartz and broke off specimens, which he sent to an cssayer, They 

gave **> Little promise of value that the assayer threw them into tie waste pile. 

On his return north Butler broke off more specimens and gave them to a 

friend with the promise thai if he would have them assayed and value was 

indicated he would give him a share in the claims. In due time values of from 

>.-)M to $600 in silver and gold a ton were reported. The news reached the first 

■ >-. who fished the rejected specimens from the waste pile and assayed 

them with astonishing results. 

This was the dawning of a better day for Nevada. Tonopah, Goldfield, 
Searchlight and oilier mining camps have been burnishing up the reputation 
of the desert State. T pah, with its white quartz, led the procession in out- 
put. Butler retired rich, and in a little over a year this camp alone yielded 

-l. ,000 "f metal. Tonopah became a city of houses instead of tents, 

ami in the annual report of the director of the mint for 1902 this edifying 
little paragraph was tucked in among much geological and technical description: 
•'Tonopah supports thirty-two saloons, six faro games, two dance houses, 
two weekly newspapers, a public school, two daily stage lines, two ehurehes 
and other elements of internal prosperity. It is a very orderly community, and 
tin re has been hut oil- stage robbery thus far." 

The geological survey has recently printed a quarto volume of 295 pages 
describing this mineral district, which has passed the day of reckless ami 
feverish activity ami now commands the capital required to mine and reduce 
its ores on a solid business basis. Tonopah has a population of several thou- 
sands and a railroad which cheapens the cost of transportation to the smelters. 



The nub of the matter is that Nevada is beginning to open n - trea 
vaults. The geologists working there are no1 writii obituarj 

of abandoned camps. The State 9QOW8 signs of new life ami vigor after In r 

sleep of fifteen years, she will be treated more respectfully bj hei 

States if she continues to pull gold ami silver mil of her pockets, V'u 
York Sun. 



SIXTY-TWO HOISTS AT GOLDFIELD. 



In order to satisfy its own curiosity and also to enlighten the world at 
large as to the enormity of the vast amount of development work that is 
going on in the Goldfield district, the Goldfield Kcview has had a representative 
in the tield for three days to determine the total energy that is being used 
on the various mines and leases, the depth, development work ami the total 
number of men employed in the properties using motive power. 

Until six months ago Goldfield had less than ton producing mines. Today 
it has twenty-six and while it is true that from some of them the shipments 
are not so very large and are only sent out every month, there is enough 
going out from the big ones to bring the average up to a very high stan- 
dard. These shipments, it must be understood, are being increased overj 
day as a result of the increasing development work that is being done. 

In taking the census of the properties equipped with motive power it 
was found that there was a total of sixty-two with either gasoline electric 
or steam hoisting plants. Of the total number thirty-four are using gasoline, 
twenty-five are equipped with electric and three with steam. 

Within the next two weeks several of the leases of the Mohawk will have 
their plants doubled and the next thirty days will see at least forty more 
plants in operation. Fully this number has been ordered and from the activity 
among the smaller operators and leasers it is believed that this number will 
be doubled within the next month. 



Shipments Commenced to Big Mill at Millers. 
The first shipment of ore from the Tonopah Mining Company's mine to 
the big stamp mill nearly completed at Millers was made last Tuesday. The 
shipment was not very large, according to Superintendent R. ('. Turner, being 
merely sufficient to fill the ore bins. This shipment is an important event 
for this vicinity, as it means the operation soon of the greatest stamp mill in 
Nevada, and adds greatly to the State's industries. Mr. Turner stated Wednes- 




anhattan, Nevada 

The World's Wonder Gold Camp 



The Manhattan Nevada Gold Mines Co. owns and operates extensive and valuable 
properties that seem destined to make Manhattan's greatest mines. 

A limited amount of treasury stock in this company is now offered at 

THIRTY CENTS PER SHARE 

Every share of stock is fully protected by our $3,000,000 Trust or Guaranty Fund. 

Under the same management as the Murchie Gold Mines Con., the Empire 
Gold Mines Ltd., the California and New York Oil Co., the California Monarch 
Oil Co., and other famous dividend payers. 

As an absolutely safe and wonderfully profitable investment this stock is unrivaled. 

Write at once for illustrated prospectus and six month's free subscription to the Invest- 
ment Herald. 



A. L. WISNER & CO 

Bankers Fiscal Agents 

80 Wall Street, New York 



H 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



day that larger shipments would be made later and that operations would be 
begun at the plant within a short time, although he could not give the 
exact date. 



Ground Broken for Big Mill. 
Ground was broken on the 27th ulto. for the gigantic reduction plant 
that will be erected at Khyolite by the Shoshone Consolidated company to 
treat the ores of that mine. The graders have started on the big excavation 
that it will be necessary to make, and the directors of the work state that 
no time will be lost in getting the site ready for the foundations. The mill 
will have a capacity of 500 tons a day. 



STAMP MILL BUSY AT MANHATTAN. 



The three-stamp mill at Central one mile below this camp in the canyon, 
is now hard at work, with the stamps falling sixteen hours a day. The results 
on the last batch of ore treated, that from the Crescent property of this camp, 
worked very well, and Manager Walker of the mill says that the recovery 
was over 90 per cent of the value of the ore. Several other properties are in 
shape to deliver rock to the mill when it is ready to treat it and good returns 
are expected on their investment by the owners of the little plant. 

At no time since the first rush to this camp has mining activity been as 
pronounced as at present, nor has there ever been a period in its history when 
mining effort was as well directed, results more fruitful and success more 
certain. Even during the heated period of the past two months work on the 
various mining properties has been prosecuted with vigor and with the advent 
of cooler weather the increase in activity is pronounced. 



CONTRIBUTION TO THE THEOBY OF OKE DEPOSITS. 



"Ore Deposits of the Silver Peak Quadrangle, Nevada," is the title of a 
professional paper (No. 55) recently published by the United States Geologi- 
cal Survey, which will be welcome as a valuable addition to the library of 
the mining geologist and the professor of geology. It is a notable contribution 
to the literature on the theory of ore deposits, a subject to which the author, 
Mr. Johiah Edward Spurr, has already devoted considerable attention in his 
previous writings. 

After describing the general geology of the Silver Peak quadrangle, Mr. 
Spurr takes up the metalliferous deposits of this area in detail, describing 
them first and then discussing their genetic relations developing finally from 
these observations the theory of metalliferous veins of magmatic quartz. 
Briefly stated, the author's conclusion is that some auriferous quartz bodies 
may be of magmatic origin and may, indeed, be regarded as a phase of granitic 
magmas. This conclusion supports the theory which he proposed in 1898 to 
explain the auriferous quartz veins of the Yukon district in Alaska. The 
whole theory, including the transition of quartz veins to pegmatites and these 
to granitic rocks, was at that time original with him, but by continued study 
he finds that more and more of it had been anticipated, until practically the 
only portion left which he can consider as original is the conclusion that 
granitic quartz veins, which are really the ultra-siliceous form of the magma, 
may contain metals, 'especially gold, in sufficient quantity to constitute ores, 
and the corollary, later announced, that gold-quartz veins are especially con- 
nected with intrusive bodies of granitic rocks. 

This most recent paper of Mr. Spurr 's will be particularly interesting when 
read in connection with his previous report' (Professional Paper No. 42) on 
the ore deposits of Tonopah which lies not far east of the Silver Peak quad- 
rangle. The ore deposits of Tonopah were described as due to the action of 
magmatic waters and vapors following the eruption of certain Tertiary vol- 
canic rocks. 

Non-metalliferous minerals also occur in the Silver Peak quadrangle, and 
deposits of these are described by Mr. Spurr. About ten miles north of Silver 
Peak there is a deposit of alum and sulfur iu rhyolite. The several playas 
within the quadrangle contain incrustations of common salt and borates of 
lime and soda. The borax industry is dormant at present but has been of 
considerable importance. Boron is one of the rarer elements, and occurs 
principally in deposits from dry lakes or in deposits from volcanic fumaroles. 

Coal occurs in the Tertiary sediments at the north end of the Silver Peak 
Eange. The chief seams are four in number. The coal is of rather poor 
quality containing a good deal of ash. However, it might possibly be used 
as a gas coal. 



Tonopah and Goldfield Railroad Plans Big Improvements. 

'General Superintendent Hedded of the Tonopah & Goldfield Bailroad has 
given out the information that extensive improvements are about to be made 
on that line. The station at Tonopah is to be remodeled, the shops now located 
at that point removed to Millers, and considerable new equipment installed. 
Six new engines have been ordered for the Bullfrog-Goldfiekt road, which are 
expected to arrive any day. The general prosperous condition of the Nevada 
camps is responsible for the above improvements, the present facilities of the 
road being very inadequate to the tremendous amount of business handled 
over it. 



Central Tonopah and Goldfield. 

Work is progressing favorably on the shaft which is being sunk on the 
Bugle group of the Central Tonopah and Goldfield mines at Goldfield. This 
work is being done by contract. The surface showings are very gratifying 
and the company is confident of success in its venture. 

United Tonopah and Goldfield. 

Work is progressing nicely on the Freedom claim of the "United Tonopah 
& Goldfield Mines at Goldfield. The vein in the bottom of No. 2 shaft con- 
tinues to show up well and it is believed is the making of a rich mine. 
Drifting has been commenced from the 200-foot level. The gasoline hoist is 
expected to arrive any day, when further development can be hurried for- 
ward more vigorously. 



CALIFORNIA. 



New Idra Mine Storing Oil. 
The New Idra Mining Company has stored about 3,000 barrels of oil for 
its winter use. Owing to the fact that the road to its property runs in the 
bed of the creek nearly all the way from Coalinga, it is almost impossible 
to get its oil for fuel at any time but during the dry weather. 

Murchie Gold Mines Con. 
Work is progressing nicely at the Murchie Gold Mines Con. near Nevada 
City. The work of blocking out the large bodies of high-grade ore continues 
uninterruptedly, there being enough already in sight to keep the mill running 
for many years. The twenty-stamp mill is pounding away day and night, 
turning out good values. The Murchie is now recognized as one of the leading 
mines in the State, both in value and extent of its ore bodies, and also in 
equipment. It has added materially to the gold output of Nevada County, 
which now leads in the production of that metal. 

Tightner Mine a Wonder. 

The Tightner mine at Alleghany is a wonder. The record of a few days 
has dwarfed the remarkable output of the mine a year ago, when ore was taken 
out that amazed the mining world. Recently two shots unloosened a bunch 
of ore from which no less than $30,000 will be taken. There are two pieces 
of rock, one weighing 118 pounds and the other 121 pounds in which it is 
estimated that there is no less than $12,000. It is expected to duplicate this 
remarkable showing. Superintendent Johnson recently took the Tightner back 
from the company that had it bonded and he is not sorry. He has three 
shifts at work running ahead the lower tunnel, which will tap the vein at 
a depth of about 600 feet. The Tightner is surely the greatest mine in Sierra 
county, and one of the richest in the country. 

Copper Deal in Shasta County. 

An important mining deal was closed in Redding, Shasta county, on the 
26th ult. by the terms of which the Mammoth Copper Company has taken 
over the Old Quartz Hill Company's claims, located in the Old Diggings district, 
for a term of five years, with the option of an extension of five years more, 
and the copper company is to take out at least 15,000 tons of rock per 
annum. 

As a result of these conditions the Mammoth people have already had a 
survey made from the mines to the Sacramento river for a railroad or tram- 
way, and will build a bridge across the big waterway to connect with the 
Southern Pacific Railroad. 

Empire Gold Mines, Ltd. 

The work of reconstructing the twenty-five stamp mill of the Empire Gold 
Mines Limited in Sierra county has been nearly completed and the stamps 
will again be dropping within a few days. Work of blocking out the rich 
ore continues, there being already enough in sight to keep the mill running 
for years. The lower levels and upper tunnel continue to show the best values, 
and work is being concentrated at these points. There is much free gold 
showing up in the upper tunnel. The chlorination plant has been put in first- 
class condition to handle the sulphurets, everything being reduced to gold 
bullion at this mine. As high as 98 per cent of the values contained in the 
ore are saved. With a most efficient plant it is believed that the next year's 
output will be materially increased over that of preceeding years, the large 
bodies of rich ore guaranteeing the maintenance of such an output for a 
long time. 



CHARGES GREEN 

General Drafting and Tracing— BLUE PRINTS— Fine 
Map Work a Specialty. 

2430 Charming Way Berkeley, Cal 

Telephone Berkeley 461 



PACIl-k MINING & OIL REPORTER 



15 



CALIFORNIA STOCK AND EXCHANGE BOARD. 



m tin' California Stock and E 
Board i 

Alaska. 
Asked. Bid. 



Bid. 



cohango 

Ask.'. I. 



Wild ■ 

ut 4.70 

-">■"> 

r Hill I.I" 

I Eureka BO 

Valley 11:1 

. 



Furnace Creek 

Kuril 

Greenwati 
Ligbtnef Min. 
South Eureka . 



Ex. 



.390 



.I'M 1 

1 .2.". 



;i 



Belmonl 6.25 

Tonopah 

Brgr's .1. B. Ex 25 

California 22 

11 

Bureka Tonopah 

Gold Anchor 07 

Gold 1 frown 21 

Golden Gate Hi 

Gold Mountain hi 

Gold Mi on m 

Great Western 04 

Gypsy Queen 24 

Some . 24 

Indiana Tonopah 02 

Iowa Tonopah "7 

-Tim Butler 1.72 

Jim Butler Ex 

Little Tonopah 2.50 

MacNaraara s2 



Nevada— Tonopah District. 



6.81 

.2:: 
.15 
.06 

.2! 



.2". 
.114 
.in 



Midway 2.90 

Midway Ex 35 

Mizpah b>x .11 

Montana 4.00 



Ex. 



Adams 13 

Aloha in 

Atlanta 52 

Band 15 

Berkeley 

Ants »3 

Blk. B. Bonanza 06 

Black Butte Ex 04 

Black Bock . . '. 05 

Blur Bell 12 

Bine Mull 22 

Brooklyn 04 

Butte Goldfield 14 

Bulls ami Bears 03 

Booth 1.U5 

C. O. I) 60 

Colorado 

Columbia 50 

Columbia Mountain 72 

Combination Fraction. . . . 2.05 

Commonwealth 19 

Conqueror 23 

Cracker Jack 

Daisy 1.10 

Dm. B. Butte C 39 

Dixie 09 

09 

13 



1.75 

.us 

."...-.11 

.84 

Goldfield 

; .14 



Mont. Mid. Ex. 
.M..n. Pitts. Ex. 
X. V. Ton. Con. 

..orth Star 

1 iliin Tonopah. 
Ohio Tonopah 

Paymaster 

Bed Bock Ex 

Bescue 

Tonopah Extension . 
Tonopah Home Con. 

Tonopah ijode 

Tun Silver ami Cold. 
Tonopah of Nevada . 



.. .in 

. . .13 

. . .25 

. . .45 

. . .27 

.. .12 

. . ."I 

. . .11:; 

. . .25 

. . 7.25 

. . .01 

. . .01 

. . .04 
..20.50 



Empire 

Esmeralda 

Exploitation 

Federal 

Florence 

Frances Monawk . . 

Prise '. 

Cold Bar (lid 

Gold Dust 

i.l.l. Belmont 

1 1 I.I. II. of Nevada 
(.1.1. X. Star 

(il.l. Portland 

(II. I. Kewnnns 

Goldfield Rand . . . 
Great Bend 

M. . . 



2.20 
.78 
.07 
.SO 



1.115 
.15 
.20 

.66 



.11 

.53 

.211 
.... 

.04 
.117 
.115 
.06 
.13 
.24 
.05 
.Hi 
.ut 
1.10 

.10 

.51 

.74 

2.10 

.25 
.11 
1.15 
.40 
.10 
.10 
.15 

.14 
2.50 



.112 

.65 

1.10 

.24 
.OS 
.07 
.70 



114 



.11(1 
74 



04 



Cold. 



.10 

.:;.-. 
.:-: 1 

.05 
.45 



Amargosa (I 
Amethyst . 
Big Bullfrog 
Black Spar . 

Bonanza All. 

Bonnie Clare 20 

Bullfrog Annex (14 

Bullfrog Ban nrr 40 

Bnl I frog ' lombination 

Bullfrog 1 '..a 02 ..15 

Bullfrog Daisy 12 .11 

Bullfrog Ex 14 .15 

Bullfrog Bundle 10 

Bullfrog Belmont 20 

Bullfrog Gold K ll .10 

Bullfrog Jumper .10 

Bullfrog Mayflower 77 .70 

Bullfrog M. Co. X 53 .56 

Bullfrog National Bank. . .59 .60 

Bullfrog X. Star 10 

Bullfrog Sunset IS .19 



Bullfrog District. 

Golden Sceptre 54 

Gold Mountain Goldfield ... 
Happy Hooligan . . . 
Homestake Con. . . . 

Big.' Harris 

Little Bullfrog 

Mayflower Ex 

Maryland 



.13 

1.20 
.07 



ill 



.2.) Montana Bullfrog 12 

Montgomery Hill M . .11 

Montgomery Mountain... .55 
Montana-Shoshone Ex. . . .14 

New Orleans . (15 

Nevada Bullfrog Midas.. .48 

Xugget 12 

North Shoshone 

(Hii.. Bullfrog 

Original Bullfrog 16 

Pilot 

Ehyolite Townsite 07 

San Francisco 10 



4.75 

1.12 

.05 

.15 



3.00 

..-.5 

4.1(1 

.12 

.30 
.40 
.28 
.16 
.02 
.04 
.26 
8.00 
.02 
.02 

21.25 







2.40 




.. .35 


.40 


District. 






Greal Bend Annex . 


.. .17 


.IS 


Great Bend Ex 


.. .21 


.... 












.08 




. . l.iid 


4.10 






.77 






.09 






.73 




. . .02 


.04 




.. 1.70 


1.75 




. . .19 


.21 




.. .17 






.. .10 


12 






.40 




.. .14 


.15 






.10 


Milltown M. Co 




.30 






15.00 


Mohawk Ex 


. . .25 


.27 




. . .09 


.in 


Nevada Goldfield . . . 


.. .50 




Oro 


. . .38 


.40 




. . .02 


.04 


Potlateh 


. . .17 


.19 


Red Hills 


. . .15 






.. .04 


.07 


Red Top 


. . 3.S0 


3.85 


Red Top Ex 


.. .14 


.15 




. . .80 


.82 




.. .80 


.82 




. . .17 






. . 1.30 


1.35 




. .18 


.20 


Speaviu'.-iil Goldfield . 


. . .28 




Spearhead Fraction . 


. . .25 






. . 6.4 


.65 




.. .ll.'l 


.04 




. . .07 


.1(1 




.. .10 


.12 






.11 




.. .02 


.03 



.55 
.09 
.15 
1.25 
.us 
,03 
.12 
.03 
.13 
.15 
.56 

.10 

.53 

.17 
.25 

.17 

.08 



l'.i.].l WEST r.15.) 

I lign-grade So 
Mm.s and Mining 



w estern Union 
— Private 
Cable — "Borlim' 



Alfred A. Borlini & Co., Inc. 

Capital, $100,000 

OUR SPECIALTIES 

High-class Investments in Tonopah, Goldfield, 

Bullfrog, Manhattan, and Adjacent Districts 

We handle None But the Best 

OUR AIM 

PROFITS FOR CLIENTS 

NOW OFFERING 

Shares in the Bullfrog Fortuna Mining Company at 
25 cents per share. Property consists of two claims, the 
Big Chieftain and Pick-up, situated contiguous and ad- 
jacent to the Montgomery Shoshone, Ametlrysl and Lucky 
Jack properties. In presenting this we arc not offering 
a more prospect, as the company is actively engaged in 
developing the property. Shalt and winz down 75 feet, 
tunnel in 165 feet. Have already uncovered a four-foot 
vein of high-grade ore and two smaller ones of an ex- 
ceedingly rich nature. Forty assays average $43 : 

Three railroads will be running into Bullfrog within 
a fortnight. This means cheap transportation and sup- 
plies, as well as increased milling facilities and consequent 
big returns to investors. 

The Bullfrog Fortuna has all the earmarks of lie- 
coming a great mine. Property, location, directorate and 
management the best. 

Write to-day for pamphlet and secure your reserva- 
tions at once. 

A. A. BORLINI & CO., Inc. 

Suite 33 Saint Mungo Building, 1300 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco 



Bullfrog Victor 

China-Nevada 

Croesus 

1 1. 'liver Bullfrog 

Denver Bullfrog Annex. 

Denver Rush Ex 

Eclipse 

Gold Bar 

Gold Bar Annex 

Gold Bar Ex 

Gold Dollar" 

Goldfield Bullfrog . ... 



April Fool Ex 

Atlantic and Pacific . . 

Comet 

Gold Wedge 

Granny G. M 

1 1 indocraft 

Indian Camp 

.lumping Jack 

Little Grey 

Manhattan Belmont . . . 

Manhattan Belle 

Manhattan Broncho . . . 
Manhattan Buffalo . . . 
Manhattan Carson .... 
Manhattan Central .... 

Manhattan < 'oils 

Manhattan 1 '..ns. Ex. . . . 
Manhattan < onibination 
Manhattan Crescent . . . 
Manhattan Cowboy . . . 



.11 

.in 
.28 
1.711 
.30 

1.12 

1.45 



.11 
.30 



.32 

.us 



1.5(1 
.25 



.05 
.in 
.01 



Shoshone-Bullfrog Gold.. 
Shoshone National Bank. 

Skookum Bullfrog 

Starlight Bullfrog 

Sti 1 away 

Tramp Cons 

Tramp M. Co 

Valley View 

Velvet . . ; 

Ventura 

Wolverine . ............ 

Yankee Girl 



Manhattan District. 



.11:: 
.11.". 



.14 

.2M 



.35 

.114 
.11: 
.12 

.us 



.12 
Og 



.04 

.114 
.112 
.10 
.24 
.10 



.05 



Belmont Johnnie . 
Bullfrog Johnnie . . . 
* lentennial Goldfield 

i longress 

1 lyrus Noble 

Diamondfield Tri. . . 

Excel Mr. 1 lop 

Esperanza 

Pairview S. King . . 
Pairview Eagle 

Giant Hat tie 

Johnnie 

Gold Seed Ex 



.1:1 
.111 
.1:; 
.Hi 
.05 
!5 
.08 
.1.1 
.09 
Other 






.15 



Ma tilial tan Dexter . 

Manhattan lluinli.il.il 

Manhattan Little Joe. . 

Manhattan Jumbo . . . . 

Manhattan M. Co. Xev. 
Manhattan Mou.lv Ex. . 
Ma 11h.1t lull < Iri. Pino . . . 

Mi. ahattan Bed Top. . . 

Mineral Hill 

Mustang Annex 

Mustang Manhattan . . 

Mustang Ex. . 

1 Iriginal Manhattan . . . 

Pine Xnl 

Rocky Hill 

Sevier Humphry 

Stray I l>u 

Thanksgiving 

Whale , 

yellow Horse 

Districts. 

Kawi.h M. Co. X 

I.i.la 11.11 

I 'reek 

Midway Johnnie 

Nevada Hills . 

Nevada Hills Ex 

Nevada Sunshine 

Nevada Tale Gold 

North Star Wonder . . . 
Palmetto 

1'alm I.. Strike . 
Pittsburg s. Peak . . .. 
Pyramid 



.04 
.27 
.97 
.38 
1.72 
1.00 
.17 

.10 
.01 

.is 



.(14 

."0 
.12 



.11:: 
.is 



.11 

.02 



.11 

.ill 






.45 









.08 
.07 
.29 

1.00 
.39 

1.75 

.is 
.12 

.04 
.19 



.11 

.05 

Jill 
.13 
.1(1 

.us 
.us 
.111. 

.19 

.no 

.2s 
." 
.20 
. 1 1; 
.0:: 
.07 
.l.'I 
.115 

> 






i6 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



Gold Reed Mines .... 


. . ,U> 






Uoldyke Reef 


. . .18 
. .. .13 


Goldfield Tule Can. . 




Ida Mines 


. . .40 


Johnnie Cons 


.. .25 


Kawieh & B 




Kawich Keyst 


01. 



08 
.20 



.26 
.03 
.02 



Ramsey 

Red Boy 

Rocco Homestake 

Round Mountain 

Round Mountain Alpine . 
Round Mountain Ex. . . 

Sierra M. & M 

Svlvania '. 



.94 
.08 
.09 
.12 



.20 
.53 
.20 
.97 
.10 



.06 



SAN FRANCISCO STOCK & OIL EXCHANGE. 



Following are the latest quotations for stocks of oil companies listed on 
the California Stock & Oil Exchange: 

Bid. Asked. Bid. Asked. 

Asstd. Oil Stk. Tr. Cer... $60.00 Kern (new) 10 

Asstd. Bds. 5 p. c. (1922) 85.00 Linda Vista 



4.00 $10.00 McKittrick 

.35 Oil City Petroleum 

.07 Peerless . . . .• 

.20 Pittsburg 

.41 Sovereign 



.05 

.32 

3.00 



< laribou 

Chicago Crude (old) 

Chicago Crude (new) 

Four 

Home 

Imperial 16.00 Superior 06 

Independence 09 Sterling 

.junction 12 Twenty-Eight 4.00 

Kern 10.00 West Shore . 1.50 

The following are the sales of oil stock listed on the California Stock and 
Oil Exchange from October 19th to November 4th, inclusive. 



3.75 
.05 
.25 

1.50 

6.00 

.40 



Associated- 
1,070 shares at $0.3S 



1,000 shares at 
100 shares at 



.38% 
.43 



] ,000 shares at . . 43% 

Caribou — 

100 shares at 6.00 

Chicago Crude (new) — 

1,500 shares at 

Home — 

1,000 shares at 

1,000 shares at 

100 shares at 



.08 



.38 
.39 
.40 



Imperial 
50 shares at . 
Independence 
2,000 shares at . 
Linda Vista— 
.500 shares at . 
Junction — 
1,000 shares at . 
1,000 shares at . 
500 shares at . 
1,000 shares at . 
1,000 shares at . 
Peerless — 
150 shares at 4.00 



.12.00 

. .09 

. .10 

. .04 

. .08 

. .09 

. .10 

. .11 



Graciosa Oil Company Purchases Tank Steamer. 
The Craciosa Oil Company has purchased a new tank steamer for its 
coast trade from the J. M. McDuffer Oil Company of New York. It is 307 
feet long, thirty-six feet broad and has a tonnage capacity of 3,269 tons. The 
company's refinery at Oilport is progressing nicely. The Risdon Iron Works 
is installing the machinery and the Lacy Manufacturing Company has a gang 
of men at work on its storage tanks. A gang of 150 men is working in and 
around the buildings which are being put up as fast as possible. A complete 
electric plant has been installed, which will furnish power to a greater part 
of the plant as well as lighting the grounds and buildings. 



New Company Incorporated. 

A new company has been incorporated under the name of the Pacific Coast 
Transport Company, with a capitalization of $1,000,000, for the purpose of 
building and operating pipe lines in and around Santa Maria, as well as to 
operate steamers in the bay, along the coast and across the ocean. A contract 
has been made with the Graciosa Oil Company for its pipe line from Casmalia 
to the port, together with the one to Oilport. Tankage will be put up at various 
points along the coast. 



King Keystone Oil Co. 

Lubricating Oils and Greases 

Marine Engine Oils, Boiler Compound, Distillates 

Linseed Oil, Paraffine Wax, Vegetable Oil 

Asphaltum, Animal Oil, Fish Oil 



22 Clay Street 



San Francisco, Cal. 



SIiATTLE BRANCH: 
Cor. Pike St. and R. R. Ave. 

REFINERY: West Berkeley, Cal. 



Wm. Walla 



B. W. Charlesworth 



WALLACE & CHARLESWORTH 




PLUMBERS, TINNERS and 

Galvanized Tank Builders 

Everything j n Plumbing, Tin and 

Sheet Iron Work 
Estimate furnished on all kinds 

of work 

Oil TankSj Bath Tubs, Sinks, 

Wagon Tanks, Toilets, Pumps, 

Water Barrels, Lavatories, 

Wind Mills 



P&B 

Coalinga, Cal, 



Agent of 
ROOFING PAINTS 



WRITI NG IN SIGHT 

Just Purchased New 

L. C. SMITH & BROS. 



TYPEWRITERS 




~T7j; 



Nathan-Dohrman Co 6 machines 

Union Trust Bank 5 " 

Cal. Wine Association. 6 " 

Cal. Safe Deposit Bank 5 " 

Also City and County Bank, & Nevada Bank 
Catalogue Free 

L. & I. ALEXANDER & CO. 

1820 Fillmore Street 

Telephone West 6288 

Branches: — Los Angeles, Portland, Seattle, Spokane, 

Tacoma. 




OF^ANYJeAiaAC l-T-Y 



WARREN citx * wR KS 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



n 



RECORD STILL RESORTS TO MUD. 



PRIVATE ROOHS 



JULES WITTMAN 



rter made I "t thai there were twenty throe 

rilling in the Coalinga Held in September. Ac -.lint; to the best in- 

format! I half thai number were actually drilli 

•|'l„. explained by the probable facl thai the Record is no) in 

i. .n to obtain "the l»'st information possible." A journal whose col 
ire principally filled with patent medicine advertisements and garbled 

n frurn pnblicatio sr standing is not usually understood to 326 BUSH STREET, Bet. Montgomery and Kearny. San Francisco 

such a position. The facl remains thai there were twenty-three wells 

drilling in September in the Coalinga field. 



Jules' Restaurant 

Only First-Class Restaurant in Burned District 
Formerly 315-323 Pine Street 

Regular Dinner, with Wine, 75 cts. 
Sundays and Holidays, $1 00 

OPEN EVENINGS 



Eastern Exports for August. 



Following arc the exports of mineral nils from the Atlantic 
United States for tin- month of August 1906: 

Articles ami Customs Districts. Quantities. 

Crudl — (iallons. 

Baltimore 

and Charlestown 

Delaware ■ 

Now York 9,855 

Philadelphia 10,863,015 

Galveston 4,963,841 



ports of the 



Values. 
Dollars. 



Total 



15,836,741 



Naphthas — 

Baltimore 

Boston and Charlestown 

Delaware 

New York 

Philadelphia 



Total 



215.S59 
1152, 143 

866.002 



Illuminating' — 

Baltimore . 

Boston ami Charlestown 4,150 

Delaware 

New York . 45,908,961 

Philadelphia . '. 34,551,094 

Galveston 



Total 80,464,5ii5 



Lubricating and paraffin- 
Baltimore 

Boston and Charlestown . . . 

Delaware 

New York 

Philadelphia 

Galveston 



175,665 
17,423 



Total 

Residuum — 

Baltimore 

Boston and Charlestown 

Delaware 

New York 

Philadelphia 4,552,964 

Galveston 



6,474,668 


2,621,418 


"5,95" 


9,315,126 


12,500 


4,000 


1.552,964 


1 " "7" 



Total 



4,581,736 



Total mineral oils — 

Baltimore 175,665 

Boston and Charlestown 34,373 

Delaware 

New York : 52.6 1 1 ,37:; 

Philadelphia 53,240,634 

Galveston .• 5,002,065 



Total 



.111.064,110 



753 
642,818 

250,647 

984,218 



38,099 
64,600 

102,69!) 



53S 

3,068,827 

1,963,176 



5,032,541 



903,771 

286,926 

3,432 



l,2l:i,!7:: 



3S9 

127,:::::: 
' 1,100 

129,447 



22,957 
3,570 

4,01 1,839 
3,084,853 

255.179 






GAS OR STEAM POWER 

Either available at your well when your pumping engine 
is equipped with a 

D. C. & U. 

Convertible 
Cylinder 

Manufactured by 




Used in every Oil Field 
in United States. 



Simple, reliable and easy to start. Can be changed from 
gas to steam and vice versa in five minutes. 
Can be attached at the well to any drilling engine. 
Write for prices and particulars to 

E. R. UHLIN, Whittier, Cal. 



SOLE AGENT 
X'-A-OIFIO COAST 



22,937 
2,407 Cable Address " ROMANIC LONDON' 



LANE S MACANDREW 

26 Great St. Helens, 
London, England 

Oil Merchants and Brokers 



Also 
Brokers for Building, Purchasing, Selling and Chartering 

OIL TANK STEAMERS 



Managers of the Following Tank Steamers: 

"LE COQ," "ORIFLAMME," "LUCILINE," "LUX." "TEREK,' 

"BALAKANI," "CAUCASIAN," " EUPLECTELA," 

" ROCKLIGHT." " TURBO," " PINNA." 




i8 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



EUROPEAN MARKET. 

(Reported Expressly for Pacific Mining & Oil Reporter.) 
Russian Position. 

There has been considerable fluctuation in the quotations on the Baku 
market during the past month, crude petroleum for prompt delivery having 
fallen from 32% copecks to 28% copecks per pood; but during the last week 
the price recovered to 29% copecks per pood. There is no quotation at the 
present time for crude oil for forward delivery. The quotation for residuals 
has fallen from 35% copecks per pood to 31% copecks per pood for prompt 
delivery, whilst the price for delivery during the navigation of the Volga 
(which should close about the end of October) is 31% copecks per pood. 

The quotation for kerosene for prompt delivery free on rail Baku has 
fallen during the month from 40 copecks per pood to 33% copecks for prompt 
delivery. There are no sellers for forward delivery. Kerosene free on board 
vessel on the Caspian Sea for despatch to the interior by the Volga has also 
dropped very largely, and is now quoted at 33% copecks per pood. There is 
a good demand for residuals and kerosene to the interior, so' as to fill up 
stocks as much as possible before the closing of the navigation of the Volga. 
This makes the quantity of kerosene available for export very small, and 
.unless the production increases considerably it seems probable that the quan- 
tity available will be small for some time. 

The production of the Baku fields for the month of August amounted to 
only 26,276,000 poods, and out of this about 7,000,000 poods were produced 
by fountains. 

With the exception of two or three of the largest firms all the other 
producing companies of Baku are at Work, and the position is quiet and 
satisfactory. Five to ten per cent increase in the wages has been granted 
by the firms who have commenced work, ancl in addition a month 's salary 
as a gratuity at the end of the year. 

Indian Position. 

The quotations for lamp oil in the Indian markets have not varied much 
during the past. The prices of Burmah oil in Bombay has fallen 3% annas 
to Rps. 2. 4. 6., and in Calcutta the price of Russian case oil, and American, 
Sumatra and Borneo bulk oil has advanced 2 annas; whilst the price of 
Burmah oil in bulk has advanced 2% annas. The market remains firm, and 
the deliveries have been rather in excess of those for the previous month. 

The quotations are as follows: 

Bombay — Rupees. 

American ease oil (Chester) 4. 8. 0. 

Russian case oil ■. 4. 4. 0. 

Elephant oil in tins 3. 10. 0. 

Sumatra "Rising Sun" in tins 3. 10. 0. 

Borneo oil in bulk 2. 8. 6. 

Burmah oil in bulk , 2. 4. 6. 

Karachi — 

American case oil , 3. 14. o. 

Burmah oil in tins 2. 12. 0. 

Borneo oil in tins 2. 12. 0. 

Sumatra oil in bulk 2. 13. 0. 

American oil in bulk 2. 13. 0. 

Calcutta — 

American ease oil 4. g. g. 

Russian case oil ; 4. o. 0. 

Calcutta (Con.) — 

Burmah oil in bulk 2. 9. 6. 

Borneo oil in bulk . o_ ^0. 0. 

Sumatra oil in bulk .' 3. o. 0. 

American oil in bulk 3. q. 0. 

English Position. 

The quotations for American and Russian lamp oil in the London and 
Liverpool markets have not varied very much during the month. In London 
the prices of both oils have fallen %d. to 3/16d. per gallon; whilst in the 
Liverpool market the price of Russian oil has fallen %d., and American oil 
'/id. to %d. per gallon. The market is weak, and the tendency seems to be 
for lower prices. 

The quotations were as follows: 
London — 
Russian oil, 5%d.@5%d. ex. wharf in barrels. 
American oil, 6%d.@6%d. ex. wharf in barrels. 

Liverpool — 
Russian oil, 5%d.@6 d. ex. wharf in barrels. 
American oil, 6 d.@6%d. ex. wharf in barrels. 

Petroleum for China. 

The British tank steamer Tonowanda cleared San Francisco October 20th 
for Canton with a cargo of 1, 300,000 gallons of refined petroleum valued at 
$50,700. 

The British tank steamer Appalachee cleared San Francisco October 26th 
for Tientsin with a cargo of 1,400,000 gallons of refined petroleum valued at 
$54,600. 




Steel Oil Tanks 

Refineries Erected Complete 

[f you want 

Promptness 
Economy 
Durability 

and 

Honest 
Workmanship 

WRITE US 



Established 1872 



Oil Tank erected for O. R. & N. in Oregon 



Win. Graver Tank Works 

East Chicago, Ind. 



Contract 

Drilling deep 
wells for 
Oil or 
Water 
Furnish Com- 
plete Plants 
for Drilling 
Prices Reas- 
onable 




Box 237 



W. E. YOULE 



Wanted 

&ood Second- 
hand Rigs 

Oil Well Tools 

Oil Well Cas- 
ing and Pipe 

Engines and 
Boilers 

Fishing Tools 

SAN LUIS 
OBISPO, CAL. 



FRESNO COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY 

Incorporated under the laws of California, January 21, 1901 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 

F'UI*1L,*Sr PAID UP 

SEARCHERS OF RECORDS AND 
CONVEYANCE 



Abstracts of Title carefully compiled at reasonable rates 



;n:o. 111C5 K: St. Fresno, Cal, 



A. P. (DAY 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

[WHOLESALE -AND RETAIL] 

most Reliable and Complete Stoek of eamp 

supplies and oil men's furnishings 

in Coalinga 

-A_grera.t 

"Wells ^a-xg-o <2z Company 

COALINCA, CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC MIX INT, & oil REPORTER. 



• Joseph Reid Gas Engine Co. « 

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 hi i » 1 1 1 hi 1 1 hi i ii n i r 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 hi 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 

manufacturers of the 



Reid Tuio Cycle Gas Engine 



Qsaasosssas asgim 



The only reverse gear 
gas engine made that 
has been successfully 
used for drilling, clean 
ing out, pumping, pull- 




ing tubing and rods, 
in fact any work that 
the regular oil country 
steam engine is used 
for : : . : 



For prices and particulars apply to 



WILLIAM M. GRAHAM 



Pacific Coast Agent 



Coalinga, California 



barlow & hill City Livery Stable 



Up to Date 



Bakersfield, 



:l£^;k:;e:r,s 

California 



Hauling of Every Description Done 

A full line of Hardwood Lumber. 
Blacksmithing Done at Standard Prices. 
A full line of Single and Double Rigs. 

Cheney Brothers Coalinga, Cal. 



Plow of Natural Gas 
Increased by . . . 

Cooper's Gas Lift 

Also flow of water 
or oil increased and 
gas saved 

A. S. COOPER, C, E. 

2621 Hillegras Avenue 

BERKELEY, CAL. 

PATENTS 

United States and Foreign 
Trade Harks Registered 

J. H. NESBIT, Attorney 

921 Park Bldg., Pittsburg, Pa. 



The Star Drilling Machine 

Cut shows boiler mounted upon frame 

of machine for oil and gas works. It The Portable Rig which has placed upon a lower plane the expense of 

is usually advisable to have boiler operating for oil or gas. 

mounted upon trucks separate. rtg ^^ range from sha]]ow water we]ls tQ a HmU of 28 ,. ftet ,„ depth> 

but it is especially recommended for work under 1,500 feet and can handle 
easily 1,000 feet of casing. 

Oue No. 4 machine has a record of Thirty-two Soo-foot holes in one year. 

Made in Size to Suit Territory 

The only machine made that is absolutely without annoying springs. 
They are simple, powerful and efficient, easy to handle at work or on the road. 
Used in every State and Territory and in many foreign countries. 

We also make full line of Drilling and Fishing Tools, Reamers, Sand 
Pumps, Spuds, etc. 

Descriptive catalogue mailed free. 



Star Drilling Machine Company 

AKRON. OHIO 




PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



CABLE ADDEESS 



- ASPHALTAGE" 



WESTERN UNION CODE 



California Asphaltum 

Sales Agency 



THE M A L T H A BRAND 



Producers of All Grades 



REFUTED 



ASPHALTUM 



&& Per Cent Pure, Uniform Quality, Unlimited {Strpnly 

Terna. Contracts for JCargje Quantities Solicited 

Write for (Samples and Information 



SIXTEENTH AND ILLINOIS STS., SAN FRANCISCO 

JOHN Bfl^ER, *}%., Manage* 

New York Branch London Branch Chicago Branch 

Whitehall Bldg., 17 Battery Place New Broad St. House, Broad St. Railway Exchange Bldg. 



Seven Wonders 

Grand Bights •vary lrn«Ior ihould aaa 

1. Grand Canyon of Arizona, on the Santa Fe. 

2. Yosemite Valley and HetcK Hetchy, on the Santa Fe. 

3. Petrified Forest of Arizona, on the Santa Fe. 
4 1 - Niagara Falls, New YorK. 

5. Mammoth Cave, nentuchy. 

€>. Our National Capitol City, Washington. 

7. The Big Trees of California, on the Santa Fe. 



You can ice all of those on a round trip e»»t. Seductd 
rales and liberal atopovers mar be had on the Santa Fa 

Ash at 64- 1 MafKet Street, San Francisco 




Coalinga 
Iiive^y and peed Stables 

LOUIS MERRILL, Prop. 

DEALER IN HAY AND GRAIN 
FIRST CLASS TURNOUTS 

Single and Double 
AGENTS FOR STUDEBAKER VEHICLES AND WAGONS 



Coalinga 



California 



SMITH, EMERY & CO. 

Chemists and. Chemical Engineers 

ANALYSIS, TESTS, INSPECTIONS 

Petroleum, kerosene, 
Asphalt, Minerals, petals, 
Cement, CUater, Earths, 
Stone, Gases Salts, Clay 

lanlc Cars and Oil Ships 

sampled and inspected 

1068 BROADWAY at 12th 

Oal^lann California 





PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



Vol. VIII. No. 2 



San Francisco, Cal., November 20, 1906 



Price, 10 Cents 



WORLD'S PRODUCTION OF PETROLEUM IN 1905. 

The section devoted to foreign countries of the annual report of the United 
States il Survey <»ii the production of petroleum in 1905 has been 

completed ami is given herewith. In line with the efforts of all the executive 
departments to render tin* annual reports less voluminous, Mr. Griswold, the 
author of this report, lias confined the foreign Bection to an accurate statistical 
exhibit] eliminating tin- reprints of consular reports and other matter which 
have heretofore rendered it very voluminous. 

Canada. 

The total production of crude petroleum in Canada in 1905 amounted to 
634,095 barrels, having a value of $856,028, or an average price of $1.35 per 
barrel. The output of crude petroleum in Canada for the past six years is 
shown in the following table: 

Average 
Quantity. price per 

Year. Barrels. Value. barrel. 

1900 913,498 $1,479,867 $1.62 

1901 756,679 1,225,820 1.62 

1902 50,624 951,190 1.79% 

1903 486,637 1,04S,974 2.1ni/o 

19(14 552,575 984,310 1.78 

1905 634,095 856,028 1.35 

Practically all the petroleum produced in the Dominion is reported by 
districts by the Imperial Oil Company, and is presented in the following table 
in barrels of thirty-five imperial gallons, or about forty-two standard gallons, 
.the figures covering the years 1903-1905: 

District. 1903. 1904. 1905. 

Petrolia 350,390 278,299 250,701 

Oil Springs 56,405 75,530 78,125 

Bothwcll 48,880 47,654 47,959 

Moore 36,971 98,815 

Leamington 1,190 25,241 113,806 ' 

Dutton 21,483 14,217 20,976 

Thamesville 5,027 2,463 

Wheatley 1,995 4,490 1,750 

Raleigh 1,161 3,274 

Pelee Island 1,023 

Blytheswood 669 

Comber 97 

Richardson Station (Chatham) 1,249 



Totals 481,504 492,492 610,844 

Of course the production of Canada falls far short of meeting the local 
requirements, and in 1905 there were imported 22,220,665 gallons of crude 
oil, 1,366,006 gallons of naphtha, 12,878,488 gallons of illuminating oil and 
1,653,387 gallons of lubricating oil. 

The production of petroleum prior to 1895 was sold at prices established 
by the Petrolia Oil Exchange; now the producers make sales direct to the 
refiners. The average price for the year 1905 was $1.35 per barrel. The market 
opened in January at $1.42, but declined steadily until June, when the price 
was $1.30. In September it rose to $1.33 and in October to $1.39, closing in 
December at $1.38. These are the lowest prices in recent years. In 1904 
the average for the year was $1.78, as compared with $2.15 in 1903 and $1.79 
in 1902. 

Mexico. 

There was no production of crude petroleum in Mexico in 1905, but crude 
oil was imported from the United States to the amount of 14,036,517 gallons, 
valued at $786,613. The quantity of refined oil imported is not shown by 
the returns, but the total value is given at $224,016. 

Cuba. 

No production was reported in 1905 from the small wells heretofore drilled 
in the island of, Cuba, but .which have never been important producers. The 
consumers in the island were , supplied by imports from the United States, 
which amounted to 7,440,234 gallons of crude, valued at $508,983, and 2,575,7+0 
gallons of refined, valued at $375,020. 



Peru. 
Then' was a decline in 1905 in the production of petroleum from the Zor- 
ritos oil Melds of Peru, the output being only about one-half of that of the 
maximum year 1901. The production of 1905 is reported as 1,584,242 gallons 
of crude oil, 300,000 gallons of kerosene and 29,570 gallons of benzine and 
gasoline. The production in 1901 amounted to 3,135,000 gallons of crude oil, 
282,430 gallons of kerosene and 19,060 gallons of benzine and kerosene. The 
following table shows the output of the industry during the past five years: 

Crude Benzine and 

petroleum. Kerosene. gasoline. 

War. Gallons. Gallons. Gallons. 

1901 3,135,000 282,430 19,060 

1902 2,489,500 373,250 25,920 

1903 2,060,000 276,100 61,745 

1904 2,080,000 365,000 46,200 

1905 1,584,242 300,000 29,750 

In addition to the home production there were imported from the United 
States into Peru in 1905 646,025 gallons of illuminating oil, 1,305 gallons of 
naphtha and 193,022 gallons of lubricating oil. 

Russia. 

During the year 1905 the great oil fields of Russia were visited with seri- 
ous political riots and disturbances. These misfortunes h'ave seriously cur- 
tailed the output of petroleum from that country, the production being less 
than for many years. 

In the following table is given the total production from the Russian 
oil fields of Baku and Grosni for the past six years, from which it will be 
seen that there was a decline in 1905, as compared with 1904, of 23,576,385 
barrels: 

Baku. Grosni. Total. 

Year. Barrels. Barrels. Barrels. 

1900 72,120,493 3,658,924 75,779,417 

1901 80,977,638 4,190,918 85,168,556 

1902 76,414,045 4,125,999 80,540,044 

1903 71,618,386 3,972,870 75,591,256 

1904 73,723,290 4,813,365 78,536,655 

1905 49,791,356 5,168,914 54,960,270 

The total shipments from Baku, as compared with the total production 
of crude petroleum on the Apsheron Peninsula during the past five years, are 
shown in the following table: 

Production. Shipments. 

Year. Barrels. Barrels. 

1901 84,216,743 57,435,665 

1902 76,414,045 59,214,015 

1903 71,618,386 57,399,574 

1904 73,723,290 57,132,511 

1905 49,791,356 43,116,218 

The shipments from Baku in 1905 included crude oil, 2,897,359 barrels; 

illuminating, 9,209,125 barrels; lubricating, 1,303,912 barrels; other products, 
150,045 barrels, and residuum, 29,555,777 barrels. 

The division of the production among the districts of the Apsheron Pen- 
insula, or Baku field, in 1904 and 1905 was as follows: 
District. 1904. 1905. 

Balakhani 9,848,380 6,866,747 

Sabunchi 26,029,292 16,494,310 

Romani 16,063,505 11,230,732 

Bibi-Eibat 21,745,618 15,175,558 

Binagadi 36,495 24,009 

Totals 73,723,290 49,791.356 

An interesting exhibit shows the relative proportion of oil produced from 

pumping and flowing wells in Baku for the past five years as follows: 

Pumping. Flowing. 

Year. Barrels. Barrels. 

1901 68,806.438 12.171,200 

1902 65,03" 11.37 

1903 65.194,016 6,42 

1904 69,374,550 4,3-: 

1905 47,945,97S 1,845,378 



-i. 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



/The.; total nuraber-. of wells in- the--Bak-i fields on December 31,-' 
1905, are shown in the following '.table : 
-.Condition ,oi .wells. :■ . - - ' • 1904: ' 

Completed . : ' 239" 

Producing , ......... : 1,555 ' 

Trialiipumping..;.; ............ .....' , ■. . . 31 

Drilling-. ,.............;.... : 2-79 

Drilling.: deeper- . ; ~. . ' 66' 

Cleaning-out and repairing 327 

Standing idle :. -. . .-. „ i...... . ... 1,443- - 

Kigs-.up, i*eady:f or drilling . .- GO 

N*ws walla jaunt". r . .. -...'.■ ,-313 

iiengti of.IweHsj drilled -^agenes*).-:'. .::':. . . ... .•: 62,248 



1904 and 

*' ! -1905. 

: " -•■- 154 

880 

14 

141 

91 

46 

2,423 

53 

140 

-35,663 



r ■&.. * 1 sagene • equals -7. feet, i 

In the following table is given the results of the refineries of the Baku 
oilfield during 190L.and .1905, Jtlie quantities, being stated in poods of 36,112 
pounds eaeh: " ... - - 

I I. Manufacture of illuminating oils: ' 

- . '■... DISTILLATION. " 



1904. 

j j : Poods. 

Submitted to distillation — 

Grade .. •...',.: ::: .471,678,208 

(Jtfcer products', - : . : . .'. ' . . 3,013,156 



1905. 
Poods. 

285,750,219 
• 2,879,679 



I Total .' '.'. . ..' .474,691,364 

Prdduets received-— 

Kerosene . ':", . V. ;;:....,.:■:.. . .'.- .:'.. 145,434,298 

Residuals .'.;....'...-.............' 302,277,657 

-Other, products ".' ...:..,....... . 13,478,344 

Losls. . .::.... ... ,:«..." 13,501,065 

Fuejf : ns:ed ■'.■ ...--. -.' ........:.....;..- 18,020,715 

BEFINING. 
. 1904. 

Poods. 



Submitted to refining — 
Kerosene . , . ..... . : ; : . 

Other distillates 



. 145,836,212 
408,880 



bust i'v.-. | .-- i . •*.. .. ~ 

jtS Total.,!,.. <..;.. ., . . .. 146,245,092 

B^finedcp.rgduets, obtained— , : 

,,,.Ke.r.os J er t e'v ,. ■-. . < .-.....-: 141,343,264 

. Other, products. . , . . 369,884 

Loss; in refining g .,.,.. 4,531,944 

Chernieals usedv-r- 

Acid , 864,143 

,. :: Sod,a „ t . ...... ., 318,063 

. II. 1 Manufacture, of lubricating oils from distilled products: 

DISTILLATES EEOEIVED. 
,.:,-■-■■• 190 4, 

Poods. 

Machine oil .".:... .' 14,316,347 

Spindle/ oil "." ..'........;..:.;... 2,119,856 

Collider oil . ............' 516,194 

Gdudr'on : ..:....:.......... .'...' 7,687,298 

Solar distillates ....': ......... 15,256,164 

Residuals . .:....-...: -: 11,655,176 

Othef 'distillates "? 193,614 

Loss in 'distilling 3,133,918 

Fuel used :..:'.: :-. . 7,150,105 

REFINED PBODUCTS RECEIVED. 

1904. 
Poods. 

Spindle oil i .'. 1,882,543 

Machine oil , . 11,816,498 



■ ■ ■•■ 
■ .. 

... ■■..;.. ■ 



Cylinder oil . „,. . . 

''. ,: i) •■ .„-.'■: 
Loss, in refining . , 

(jneinicals used — 

Acid 






da 

:■■.'■: ■. ■ 



- 



288,756 
1,648,245 



643,783 ( 
. 64,816 



288,629,898 

67,637,730 

200,748,255 

12,146,601 

8,097,312 

10,915,511 

1905. 
Poods. 

64,904,153 
340,283 

65,244,436 

62,990,812 

299,991 

1,953,633 

343,541 
126,385 



1905. 

Poods. 

8,794,903 

1,022,427 

398,547 

5,540,617 

10,201,426 

7,030,740 

94,381 

1,726,400 

5,586,173 

1905. 
Poods. 

898,682 
7,685,889 

254,784 
1 ,000,120. 

242,112' 
46,560' 



" Austria-Hungary. 
■ Tise^n'oditftion of crude petroleum in Galicia in 1905 was 5,765,3 
of fortywtTOS gallons; as couipareKt with -5,947,393 barrels in 1904 and 
bwelsain <190§. The production by districts is reported in metric toll 
pbui{dsi.'Jeach*68 : follows: 
,©iiM*i*M"'. 



Schodnica . 



17 barrels 

5,234,475 

s of '2,204' 



546,556 
60,202 



Urycz ." ."V, . C 

Mraznica .'..". . /. '.'.... . . 

Other eastern- districts '.':.'. 

Potok-. '••:.'. ■..-'.■'.'.'.'. '.;....'...' 

Rogi . !".' 



■: -' ' ■ ■ 



20,347 
3,646 
10,600 
22,479 
24,234 

Rowne i: .'.'....: ■■••'•"''. - 1 ) 609 

Tarnawa .": :.:... 32,956 

Krosno- '. : 43,559 

Other western districts 35,608 



Total : 801,796 

. j ,,„,,,. ,. ,, ,■ , : Rouniaui* ,.,. , ,,,.,./:. (] , 

'The total production of crude petroleum in Boumania in 1905 was 61,448 
tank cars of 22,046 pounds each, or 4,420,987 barrels of forty-two United States 
gallons, as compared with 50,056 tank cars, or 3,599,026 barrels, in 1904. There 
has been a steady increase in the output of Boumania in the past five years, 
the production of 1901 being 1,678,320 barrels; 1902, 2,059,935 barrels, and 
1903, 2,763,117 barrels. The production of the refineries of Boumania in 1905 
is reported as follows, the quantities being given in kilograms of 2.2 pounds 
each: Crude petroleum manufactured, 510,143 kilograms; benzine produced, 
78,182,000 kilograms; refined oil, 153,495,000 kilograms; lubricating oil, 17,255,- 
000 kilograms, and residuum, 236,677,000 kilograms. 

Germany. 
The production of petroleum in the German Empire in 1905 was 78,869 
metric tons, or 560,963 barrels of forty-two gallons. Of this quantity 21,128 
metric tons were produced in Alsace-Lorraine and 57,741 metric tons in Prussia 
and Bavaria. The production of the past five years is shown in the following 
table: 

Quantity. 

Barrels. 

Year; (42 gals.) 

1901 313,630 

1902 353,674 

1903 ;.. 445,818 

1904 637,431 

1905 560,963 



Value. 

Dollars. 
708,115 
804,240 

1,040,160 

1,393,200 
. 1,249,680 

Italy. 

The production of crude petroleum in Italy for 1905 has not yet been 
reported. During 1904 the output was 25,476 barrels of forty-two gallons, of 
which 496 barrels were produced in the province of Parma, 24,678 in Pia- 
cenza and 302 barrels in Chieti. The total value of the output of 1904 was 
$203,286, or an average of $7.98 per barrel. The production of 1904 was the 
largest recorded in recent years, that for the three preceding , years averaging 
about 17,000 barrels. 

Great Britain. 

The production of oil shale in Great Britain during 1905 has not yet been 
reported to the' Survey. The figures for 1904 are available, however, and are 
as follows: 

Country — ■: - Long tons. Value. 

Scotland ....:. 2,331,885 £553,905 

Wales 1,177 441 



Total 2,333,062 £554,346 

The total imports of petroleum and its products into the United Kingdom 
during 1905 amounted to 300,010,355 imperial gallons. The quantity of each 
kind of oil, together with the share contributed by the United States in 1905, 
are shown in the following table: 
Kind—. - - U. S. Total. 

Lubricating ' /. 35,169,980 47,524,054 

Illuminating .:,......" 101,429,757 157,265,095 

Crude 487,430 500,669 

Spirit . '. 10,527,066 18,658,391 

Gas oil I.'.". ......: .."....:......:.. .47,547,913 63,763,765 

Fuel. oil. . . . ." 11,555,972 12,298,381 



;Totals . , : . .:.-.... ; . ... ..:... 206,718,118 300,010,355 

India. 

The production of petroleum in India in 1905 amounted to 144,798,444 \m- 
perial gaUojts.,. oi.wbich.the pxo2iac.e of. .Burma contributed. 142,063,846 gallons. 
The total value of the production of 19.05 was 9,063,051 rupees (32.4 cents). 
The following table gives the production of petroleum in India during the 
past ''five' Vears I>y 'provinces, the quantities being stated in imperial gallons: 
Year'.'' " ' ' a0;; Burma"' " '_ 

1901 49,441,734 ,B 

1902' : .'.'... V .':-.- 54,848,980'''' 

1903 V .......' 85,32S,49'1 

1904 115,903,804' 

1905 . 142;d63,846 ' 



' Assam. 


Punjab. 


Total. 


631,571 


1,S12 


' ,50,075,117 


1,756,759 


' 1,949 


1 '56,607,688 


2,528,785 


1,793 


87,859,069 


2,585,920 


1,658 


118,491,382 


2,733,110 


1,488 


144,798,444 



PACIFIC, MAKING & OIL REPORTER 



Dutch East Indies. 

ned for the production in Sumatra, Java 
and B> ' tin' output lias been approximated, tho fol- 

lowing being th< rith tin- reported production of 1904: 

1904 1905. 

Barrels. Barrels. 

Sumair 1,021 4,500, 

1,480..". 1 1 2,468,000 

79S,074 800,000 



«,316,169 7,768,000 

Japan. 
The production of erode p>tri/lr i Wn il -''vii Japan in 1900 is reported as 
gallons. Tho production of refined is given as 45,812,066 gallons. 
This prodoction of refined oil is not the whole amount of refined oil made in 
Japan, but is only that portion which is refined by those who produce crude 
oil and refine it themselves. Much of the crude oil goes into tho hands of 
others by whom it is refined, and as yet there are no means of ascertaining 
this quantity. The production of crude in 1904 was reported as 59,588,214 
gallons, as compared with 50,793,582 gallons in 1903 and 50,307,600 in 1902. 
World's Production. 
In the following table are given the figures of the world's production of 
petroleum during tin- years from 1903 to 1905 inclusive. This table shows 
a slight falling off in the year 1905 as against 1904. This is entirely due to 
the disturbances in Russia, the decrease of that country being 23,576,385 
barrels, while the production of the United States increased 17,636,620 barrels, 
as compared with the production of 1904. The other portions of the world 
made very little changes in production in 1905, as compared with previous 
years. Calicia made a slight reduction, while Koumania and India increased 
their output slightly: 

1903. 
' ry — Barrels. 

United Slates 100,461,337 

Russia 75,591,256 

Sumatra. Java and Borneo 6,640,000 

Calicia 5,234,475 

Koumania 2,763,117 

India 2,510,259 

Japan 1,203,581 



Canada . . . 
Germany . 

Peru 

Italy 

All others . 



486,637 

445,818 

61,745 

17,876 

30,000 



1904. 

Barrels. 

117,080,960 

78,536,655 

6,316,169 

5,947,383 

3,599,026 

3,385,468 

1,411,975 

552,575 

637,431 

66,200 

25,476 

40,000 



1905. 

Barrels. 

134,717,580 

54,960,270 

7,768,000 

5,765,317 

4,420,987 

4,137,098 

1,341,157 

634,095 

560,963 

37,720 

25,000 

30,000 



Totals 195,446,101 217,599,318 214,398,187 

In the statistics above presented for the year 1905 the figures representing 
the production of Sumatra, Java and Borneo are estimated. 



MURCHIE EXTENSION MINING COMPANY ACQUIRES LARGE 
ADDITIONAL VALUABLE HOLDINGS. 

One of the largest mining deals in the history of Nevada county, if not 
in the State, has just been consummated by the Murchie Extension Gold Mining 
Company by which that corporation has acquired an additional tract of 351 
acres of valuable land lying altogether in the rich mineral zone, adjoining 
the well-known Murchie Consolidated on the south, east and west, and the 




■ , .. ..■-..■.'■ 

Banner mine on the north — extending from the one to the other — embracing. an 

area kno\vn to iVe traversed by many highly mineralized veins, some of which 

have already been largely developed. 

The Murchie Extension now owns a, total area of 491 acres, consisting 

of seven. Jocaied mining claims and the. balance in United States patented 

land. It is one f the very largest individual mining holdings to be found 

in the State Adjoining such valuable properties as the Murchie Consolidated 



and tho Banner mines, its value is believed to bo almost incalculable. 
believed to bo a veritable network of mineral veins. 

The Banner, mine is well known throughout the mining world. Such men 
as Senator Belshaw and ex-State .Mineralogist 10. I[. Benjamin are- heavily 
interested in it. It is one of the richest mines in the State. 

The Murchie Gold Mines Consolidated is one of tho richest mines in the 
West. It is a heavy dividend payer, a completely equipped mine, and 1ms 
enormous ore bodies which are increasing both in value and extent as depth 
is attained. 

On tho property of tho Murchie Extension extensivo development, is being 
carried on in three localities. One shaft is opened up to a depth of oyer 300 
feet on tho vein, with drifts, all in high-grado milling ore. J?or the small 
amount of work done upon it, it has produced as well as any mino in this 
famous district. The ledge is widening out rapdily as depth is attained. The 
other locations upon which less work has been done, are showing up welt and 




Group of well-known Mining Experts at one of the other shafts of the Murchie Extension. 

giving every promise of developing into rich mines, for which this district 
has gained a wide reputation. 

The 300-foot shaft is equipped with water-power plant, water power, and 
hoist, also a complete camp. An air compressor is now being installed; Ex- 
tensive development work will be vigorously carried on-to block-out and mine 
the great ore bodies already assured. Within the next few months a stamp 
mill will be erected to mill the high-grade ore that the mine is already pro- 
ducing, as it is believed that the output will very soon be sufficient to keep 
ten stamps running constantly with the assurance that, a9 depth is attained, 
this mine will develop into one of the richest in the county. 

At one of the other shafts a hoist has also been erected and drifting is 
being done on the vein, which is showing up good milling values. Both of 
the veins here referred to pan good colors in free gold, assaying good values. 
The face of one of the drifts from the 300-foot shaft assays $37.50 per ton in 
gold, besides the silver values, which run high in these ores. 

Altogether more than 3,000 feet of development work has been, done an 
the Murchie Extension, with very gratifying results. J. C. Campbell, superin- 
tendent of the Murchie Consolidated mine, states that, in his opinion, the Mur- 
chie Extension, with its vast holdings and apparent richness, has the niaking 
of one of the greatest gold producers in California. 

Extensive development will be carried on at several additional places on 
the property in order to expose and develop the other veins which are known 
to traverse it. Prom the close proximity of the Murchie Extension to other 
rich mines; its enormous holdings; its rich gold veins already exposed, to- 
gether with an assured able and efficient management, it is believed that it 
will rapidly develop into a great and rich mine; adding to the already enor- 
mous gold output of the district, which has already made Nevada county the 
first in the production of the yellow metal in the State. 



Placers at Manhattan. 

An abundance of placer gold, according to the Manhattan News, is found 
at Manhattan and will be found to he rich when water is available". "''The 
placer ground," reports the News, "will be found to yield nearly as much or 
perhaps even more than the quartz leads during the next five years. A i 
sentative of the News visited the dry placer diggings several days ago and 
noted carefully the formation through: which-- the miners passed to get their 
pay, as well as the material that lay under the pay streak. At one afr the 
dry washers, the formation consists of a foot of. qoarse gravel and surface, dirt 
in which there is no pay. Then come six inches of sediment carrying very 
fine colors. Beneath this is a foot of tight gravel, the lower three inches of 
which is rich. This tight gravel lies on a hard pan beneath which is-afo.i*: 
of coarse gravel in which there is little pay. Then there is a foot of barrer 
sediment, and lastly the bedrock, on which no colors are found. ' ' 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



WESTMORELAND COALINGA OIL COMPANY. 



The Westmoreland Coalinga Oil Company has forty acres of land situated 
in the northeast quarter of the northwest quarter of Section 34-19-15, and has 
developed three of as good wells as can be found in the entire Coalinga field. 
Its property adjoins that of the California Oilfields, Limited, on the north. 
It is surrounded by other valuable producing property, every foot of the 
forty acres being absolutely proven territory. 




Westmoreland-Ooalinga No. 3 in action. 

The above cut illustrates well No. 3 gushing oil into the reservoir. All 
of the three wells came in gushers and have produced as much oil as any 
three wells to be found on the entire east side of the field. The oil is of a 
light gravity and finds a ready market at a good price. Derrick is up for well 
No. 4 and development of the entire property will be prosecuted vigorously. 

Mr. "WV P. Kerr is superintendent of this property, which has grown to 
such success under his able management. He is known as one of the most 
successful operators in the Coalinga field. 

There seems to be every promise that this property will grow to be one 
of the largest producers as well as one of the heaviest dividend payers in this 
rich district. 



PITTSBURG COALINGA OIL COMPANY. 



Cornering onto the southeast corner of the Westmoreland Coalinga is the 
Pittsburg-Coalinga, another oil company worthy of the name, under practically 
the same management as the former named corporation. - This company also 
has three wells which are rated at about the same production. Well No. 3, 
locally known as the McCreary well in honor of its superintendent, was 
drilled in about the first of April last, and for some time made better than 
800 barrels daily. It is now producing about 600 barrels daily. The accom- 
panying illustration depicts the well as a "Reporter" representative saw it 
on his first visit to the property after it was brought in. It was shooting 
the oil a considerable distance into the reservoir and was a very interesting 
sight. 




PituWj-Conlinga No. 3 (McCreary) flowing 800 tai 



s daily. 



. On that day the " Reporter " representative certainly had the color of.: 
oil upon him as he and his horse had just been rescued from an oily bath in 
the bottom of an old creek bed, which had been flooded with drainage oil; 
and, through the kindness of Mr. W. P. Kerr and assistants, brought to a nvore- 
solid terra firma, for which he feels very grateful. 



The wells on the property of the Pittsburg-Coalinga are drilled to' a depth 
of about 200 feet, having a very large body of unusually productive oil sand. 
It is believed that this sand is a break, lying diagonally to the main sand. 
Rig is up for well No. 4, but drilling is suspended for the present. The com- 
pany holds an additional eighty acres of land, which is now under option to 
the same parties who also hold an option on the eighty acres of the West- 
moreland Coalinga, the option price being said to be a very attractive one. 

This company, which is considered to be one of the leading producers in 
the field, has always had a ready market for its product, and is a good dividend 
payer. 



CALIFORNIA DIAMOND OIL COMPANY. 



RAPIDLY COMING TO THE FRONT AS ONE OF THE STATE'S LEADING 
OIL PRODUCERS. 



Has Producing Property in the Famous Coalinga Oil Field, Also at Sunset, 
Kern County. — Large Proven and Prospective Area Gives the Company 
a Most Brilliant Future. — It Is Following Closely in the Wake of Other 
Successful Dividend-Paying Companies Under the Same Management. 



A well-known and meritorious corporation now taking its place among 
the leading oil producers of the State is the California Diamond Oil Com- 
pany, operating extensively in the proven area of the famous Coalinga oil 
field, Fresno county; and in Sunset, Kern county, California. This company 
was organized about one year ago and has. since been actively engaged in 
developing its properties, having, at the present time, two flowing wells at 
Sunset and two producing and one drilling well at Coalinga. The production 
of the Coalinga wells is taken on contract by the Associated Oil Company 
at a good price, putting the California Diamond on an immediate dividend- 
paying basis. 




Party at visitors at Well No. 5, California Diamond Oil Company. Coalinga. 

The California Diamond Oil Company is incorporated under the non- 
assessable laws of Arizona, its stock being full paid and non-assessable. Its 
officers and directors are well known in the successful development of the 
State 's - oil" fields. The- management is in the hands of thoroughly honorable, 
trustworthy business men, who have the enviable reputation of having made 
such .companies as the California & New York and the California-Monarch 
Oil Companies famous. 

The; properties of the California Diamond- Oil Company consist of 2,380 
acres,. .Of which 2,340 acres is in the Coalinga district and forty, acres in the 
Sunset, district. They constitute some of the most valuable oil land to be 
found, in the State. The wells already drilled have proven to be large pro- 
ducers,, and there is every reason to believe that the entire 2,380 acres is 
very .rich and productive. A part of it lies contiguous to some of the richest 
properties in" the Coalinga field, such as the California-Monarch, for instance, 
which, has developed one of the largest producing wells of the State, if not 
in the world.. Practically the entire holdings of the company lie within 
the conceded proven area of the Coalinga field, guaranteeing a permanent 
production. 

Extensive development work has been done on the California Diamond 
properties. - At Sunset ■ two wells have been drilled that flow steadily and 
uninterruptedly producing a large amount of oil. This Sunset property is 
in the shallow territory, in which wells may be drilled at the very minimum 
of expense, all flowing, it being a very productive district. There is more 
than 400 feet of productive oil sand. Wells drilled here several years ago 
are producing as .much oil to-day as they did the day they were drilled. At 
thiw^poimtothe' company has a' complete camp, drilling equipment, and an 
efficient plant for the economic handling of the property. 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



At Coalinga the i ompaoy has two producing well* thai are numbered 
anions The; arc located but a short distance from 

the famous I Monarch gusher, drawing, their oil (ram the same sand, 

which it vi ry rich ami productive and of great thickness. The prodaetion of 

is readily sold at a good pri.o, bringing the company a nice 
income. On another pleee of property in the lie,ht oil district a well is 
drilled which promisee to be one of the beet in tin field. It is I. 
J to other log producing wells, making the success ot' this one a surety. 
It has now reached a depth of over 1,200 feet and should be completed within 
a very short time when it is anticipated that a very large production will be 
add» d to the profits of the company. All of the properties of the California 
Diamond Company are well equipped with comfortable camps and drilling 
equipment — in fact, everything that goes to make up an efficient plant. 



The remarkable advances made in the past few years in the uses of oil 
as a fuel assures the greatest permanency of the oil market. From a lew 
hundred thousand barrels consume..! seven or eight years ago, the market has 
grown to such an extent that no less than 35,000,0(10 barrels of California 
petroleum oil was consumed last year (the entire production of the State), 
and the demand is increasing at such a rate that prices are advancing despite 
the rapidly increasing production. Several millions of barrels of oil held in 
storage a few years ago has been consumed and there is every assurance that 
there will be a greater demand for oil in the future than ever before. Oil 
has superceded coal as a fuel throughout the State, and great advances have 
been made in extending its use in Oregon, Washington, Alaska, British Colum- 
bia, Chile, Panama and the Hawaiian Islands. Keeent contracts have been 
made with the Japanese government for 20,000,000 barrels for use in the navy 
of the Mikado, and for refining purposes; a contract with Chile calls for 
10,000,000 barrels, and another with Panama for 2,000,000. The Southern 
Pacific and Santa Fe Railways have over 2,500 oil-burning locomotives, con- 
suming over 1,000,000 barrels monthly, while other railways in the State 
have adopted the use of oil fuel exclusively. The great Western Pacific 
Railroad, which is now building into California, will use no other fuel but 
oil. The ' ' Clark road ' ' (San Pedro, Salt Lake & Los Angeles Railway) used 
oil for all its locomotives from the opening of the road to traffic. The recent 
completion of the Panama pipe line, with a daily capacity of 25,000 barrels, 
provides another great outlet for California oil. It is not a question of what 
are we going to do with our oil, but one of how can we produce sufficient oil 
to supply the tremendous and growing demand. Its economical uses have 
been so fully demonstrated that it is eagerly sought for by all of the great 
manufacturing and transportation companies. Hundreds of vessels plying 
from San Francisco bay and from Seattle and other coast ports have been 
converted to oil burners, and the number of new installations are increasing 
daily. Wherever the test has been made it has been clearly demonstrated 
that oil at $2 per barrel is as cheap as coal at $7 per ton (the selling price 
in San Francisco and Pacific Coast ports), with the additional advantage of 
an enormous saving in the handling of the same. When we say that oil 
shipped from California to British Columbia is successfully competing with 
coal within a distance of fifty miles of some of the great colleries there, 
then it can be seen what an advantage the one fuel has over the other. 
The superiority of oil fuel over coal is freely admitted by every intelligent 
person who has ever been in a position to determine their relative value. 
The United States Government tests have been of the most gratifying in 
results, and. it is safe to say that our Navy would immediately adopt oil fuel 
were it certain of a supply, but the great manufacturing and transportation 
consumption has grown to such enormity that it would be necessary for the 
government to monopolize the supply if it were to provide for its own re- 
quirements. There is, however, a strong possibility that the Pacific squadron 
may be converted to oil burners. 

The permanency of the California oil fields has been fully demonstrated. 
Many wells that were drilled twelve to fifteen years ago are to-day producing, 
and the companies that own them are continuously paying dividends. The 
Home, Chanslor & Canfield, and Union Oil Company are notable instances. 
Geologists and practical oil men all agree that the average life of an oil well 
in California is from thirty to forty years. Thus it will be seen that the 
California Diamond Oil Company, with its large proven acreage on which 
drilling may be continued for years, is assured of a steady and increasing 
production for many years. 

Many wells drilled in the Coalinga field have produced more than half 
a million barrels of oil — and are yet producing almost as much as they did 
at the time they were drilled. The sand here is coarse and very heavily 
impregnated with oil. It is from two hundred to seven and even eight hun- 
dred feet in thickness. The area now absolutely proven to be productive is 
no less than seventy-five square miles, with the limits of the field yet to 
determine. Portions of this district, that, a year ago, were not supposed to 
be oil bearing, and which could have been purchased for a few dollars an 
acre, have been found to be very productive and have increased in value 
to almost fabulous prices. A single well drilled in a territory where the 
sand is of such great thickness proves, with absolute certainty, that all of 
the land for miles around is productive. It is thus that the holdings of the 



ind Oil Compauy are known to be rich producing territory, 
the wells already drilled proving this without a question of doubt. 

Hundreds of fortunes have been made in the oil business in I 
There are do/.ens of men who, a i ago, were in very ordinary eireum- 
stances financially, have accumulated profits front their oil properties to lli" 
extent of millions of dollars. Mirny men and women who invested practi- 
cally small amounts have i d elevated bo positions of comparative wealth 

and affluence. The value of oil production of one of the counties of tins 
State hist year exceeded in value the output of gold from the lending gold- 
producing county. An investment in the stocks of any of th anj ri putablo 

oil companies of this State is one of the most inviting fields known for tho 
profitable employment of capital, and affords the small investor with an un- 
surpassed opportunity to gain almost incalculable profits. 

In California there is no monopoly in the oil business. The Standard Oil 
Company is not a producer; buying its oil for refining purposes from inde- 
pendent operators at satisfactory prices. The fact that nearly all the oil 
prodnced in the State is particularly adapted for fuel purposes, for which 
it is of tho most value, prevents any monopoly of the industry. Any pro- 
ducer can readily contract his production directly to the consumer if, at 
any time, he can obtain a better price — in fact, much oil is already handled 
in this manner by producers who prefer to handle their own output. It will, 
therefore, be seen that the oil business in California is on a stable basis, 
all enjoying the best possible conditions; all being assured of rich and per- 
manent returns for their investments. 



We believe that as a safe, clean and conservative investment the Cali- 
fornia Diamond Oil Company's stock for ready returns is unsurpassed. 

The Pacific Mining & Oil Reporter is always glad to welcome the advent 
of such sterling enterprises, especially when managed by men who have been 
so unusually prominent and successful in the development of this great in- 
dustry. The able manner in which they have handled the California & New 
York Oil Company and the California-Monarch Oil Company — two of the lead- 
ing companies of the State — reflects greatly to their credit. They certainly 
deserve the splendid success with which they are meeting. 



SANTA MARIA FIELD IN MID-NOVEMBER. 



Field Stocks Practically Exhausted. — Pipe Line Facilities Inadequate to Trans- 
port the Field's Normal Output. — New Pipe Lines Nearing Completion. — 
Present Capacity of the Field Close to Million Barrels Per Month. 



The possible production of the Santa Maria field cannot possibly be de- 
termined with any degree of accuracy'. Although the question is often asked — 
and as often answered in a haphazzard manner — I cannot learn that any 
person in a position to know has attempted to accurately answer it, and it 
remains for some person with a positive knowledge of the production of 
each and every w 7 ell to give out the much-sought-for information. Many 
of the wells drilled in have never been allowed to produce, many a well in 
the field being capped until such a time as its production shall be needed to 
supply a fuel for the turning of the wheels of the world's commerce, or, at 
least, UE.*,'? such a time as adequate transportation facilities shall have been 
provided lor its transportation to the coast. 

The amount of oil delivered from the field can, however, be fairly accu- 
rately estimated, for, while the general average from month to month will 
vary considerably, the average for a longer period of time will give the 
approximate monthly output of the field as determined by its shipments. 

The minimum contract quantity agreed upon between the Standard Oil 
Company and the Pinal and Western Union Oil Companies is about 100,000 
barrels per month, which may be figured as the present output of these com- 
panies. 

The Graciosa Oil Company has a varying output. The greater part of it 
is pipe-lined to the Southern Pacific at Casmalia. Owing to the fact that the 
railroad has not, since the San Francisco conflagration, been in a position to 
furnish an adequate number of cars to any company, it is believed that 
100,000 barrels would represent the monthly output of this company. As soon 
as its pipe line (now building) is completed to Port Harford its output will 
be considerably increased, as it has a much greater producing capacity. 

The Brookshire Oil Company is now delivering more than its normal 
average. It is rapidly emptying its reservoirs and there is now every assur- 
ance that the quarter of a million barrels of storage oil held in this field a 
short time ago will soon have been entirely exhausted. The exact produc- 
tion of the Brookshire Company cannot be positively ascertained. 

With the exception of one well on the Hall & Hall lease, the production 
of the remaining leases in the field go in with the output of the Union Oil 
Company, which can be closely estimated at 10,000 barrels daily, or 300,000 
barrels monthly, besides its deliveries via the narrow-guage railway. The 
Union Oil Company's one pipe line to Port Harford is taxed to its fullest 
capacity, which, however, is greatly inadequate to its requirements. Its 
second line, which will soon be completed, will provide for the deficiency. 

The Western Union Oil Company delivers some oil at Gaviota to the 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



Associated Oil Company over tba,t : CQfflpaJty 's pipe line. There is also" a 
considerable quantity of oil being delivered locally, such as a supply to the 
sugar refinery at Betteravia and local consumption at Orcutt,- Santa Maria, 
Sail puis Obispo,, and to the: drillijig companies at Arroyo Grande, i 

Thus it-wjlt-be seen that any figures placed upon theV output of oil from 
this field is largely estimated. But from a eonseiencious research and Inquiry 
I believe that I^ani safe to say that the present monthly deliveries from the 
Santa' hviaiia Meld are approximately 600,000 barrels per month, or about 
20,000 Jaarrels per day. 

_' I-fSall-idf fte'-weils. that are; iiA. oil f.and; capped were -.producing their 
capacity tEe'prociuctibhof "the field would exceed 1,000,000 barrels per month. 

t-, ^Existing transportation ,£a#ilitie3~#*% l^gely^nadeqita^e for, jftra -dyliyery 
a'*' ttreTtotal •capacity -of the' field. 'WhfiiPthe Standard Oil Gbmp'any' could 



capacity -.M the" "field. *"WTiTlg"the Standard Oil (tfdmpany 
transpprl some mpre ,,than'i its^ -.present requirements it is not disposed to, act 
as' ■ ' :< common "carrier "-and,- consequently, no other company can profit thereby. 
All of the other completed lines are taxed to their full capacity. 

The Coast Oil Transportation Company (Graciosa-California Petroleum 
Befineries, Limited) is laying a pipe line between Santa Maria and Oilport, 
on S&n.Luis bay, which, whear completed, will take care of the production 
of the- . Graciosa Oil Company and greatly relieve the field. It is expected 
that "this "line will be completed some time in January next. The Union Oil 
Company 's -second line -will -probably be laid at no distant date, and will, in 
turnj,. Jjake, ,,care of that eqmpany 's production. In a very short time the 
Beeruit (Associated) Oil Company will require its Gaviota line for the trans- 
portation of its own product, and will, in addition, doubtless lay a larger 
line to San Luis bay.-. 

Although I am -reiterating what I have said on several other occasions, 
it is lack of facilities " for' delivering oil to market that is booming prices 
more than any actual shortages in the field, or even from the rise caused by 
increased demand. I have had further opportunities for verifying this state- 
ment. Now there is a great deal more oil available than is being shipped, 
and' It .-would' seem t6 us that/those interested- would realize this fact and 
fjjficifeij^l iiij ^very- .-^ay possible.: thie movement of oil to the coast. It is not 
to the advantage of producers to have high prices for oil at the cost of cur- 
tailnfeat »f deliveries tof. manufacturing centers. I again repeat that a gen- 
eral rise in price on account of increased demand is a legitimate effect of the 
law of "supply and demand," but increased prices on account of curtailment 
of $fer product ■ to, points of demand is in the long run short-sighted policy. 

It will be surprising to many people in this State to know that the 
city-of Los -Angeles'counts" over 1^500 manufacturing plants within its borders — 
that it is no longer a mere ' ' tourist city, ' ' but a growing manufacturing cen- 
t&fii thai; the '. life ?ef -the;' manufacturing- interests depends upon reasonably 
c-hSap "fuel. "Present prices are: still reasonably' cheap. It is the equivalent 
oj: J^oajt at from $2..'25' to : -'$S.50' per ton, with less expense than coal in the 
handling. This is cheaper fuel than even the great manufacturing centers 
East enjoy. Coal heretofore was prohibitive in price as a fuel in this South- 
west, much more so than at San Francisco, where there was only one handling 
from the steamers direct. To, keep up this growing demand for fuel, 
etl'from" the 'Interior must be .pipe-lirad to the coast, delivered rapidly by 
barges or steamers to seaport points, and' then pipe-lined or freighted to des- 
tination, according to requirements. 

I. In tj^is, large productive- field of Santa Maria there is no storage accumu- 
lations, , There |s riot a week T s supply ahead - should the wells be shut down. 
Even the Standard Oil Company has. no - appreciable storage on hand. Since 
jhe Union Oil jCompany 's gusher has ceased to flow the company has no 



. . F !» ei Kr» i i :■■'- i - ■ ■' - 

storage reserve. The large amount it is pumping finds. imme$i$te. f ,djeliy.e.ry at 

Port Harford, j I reiterate this fact, -for the. purpose of explaining , the dis- 
position, of .the ,6,000,000 barrels of _oil .thai . the year 1906 will-, sh pw .^s .having 

been produced from this field. , , .:. TCCKiofftfi -- ■■■■■ 

Next to the Union Oil Company, the r twp, .largest. produce^ are. the Western 
Union and the Pinal Oil Company. These two great producers, are. tied down 
for a full. year to. deliver.. their oil to the Standard Oil Company and,aceord- 
ing to the .usual contracts of the monopoly, p no matter how much surplus the 
wells may produce, they are not allowed,, to sell any oil to outside , companies. 
Consequently, production is curtailed. ,, Nq.jOil is., stored, and deliveries are 
ma.de direct, from. wells on. a h.and r t,^-mouth,.,proppsjLtiQn. . .,; „,.., 

. Eecent,iy r I,wen^ through the oil iielcj. ajjter an_lnter^al .qf.spi^.-sjxnionths. 
I find the production, of .certain. .wells, decreasing— a Jfe.w only -are-, holding 
out to near their average. The Union is steadily increasing its number of 
wells, but as it does its own marketing it will have ample demand for all 
its output. The Pinal and the Western Union can only deliver to the Stan- 
dard. The Graciosa and the Brookshire are selling their main production 
to the Associated Oil Company, and two or three minor compares sell to 
the Union. So, practically speaking, the oil of this great field is all placed. 
A strange situation for such a large producing field, with the shout of over- 
production yet reverberating in our ears!! 

In my next letter I shall give some detailed news of the field as I last 
saw it. I cannot but again refer to the Coast Oil Transportation Company, 
which took over the Graciosa 's pipe line to Casmalia and the new line build- 
ing to Port Harford bay at Oilport. This company, under the management 
of L. A. Phillips and the sub-management of A. Phillips, is progressing finely 
with its pipe line. It has one of the lightest grades from the oil .field to 
port of all of the companies. L. E. BLOCHMAN. 



ARROYO GRANDE. 

[Special Correspondence.] 

Arroyo Grande, Cal., November 18, 1906. 

Prom Oilport on San Luis bay below Port Harford, in a southeasterly 
direction, following a range df low hills, there is a well-defined break paral- 
leled on its northern border by a rib of serpentine, south of, and contiguous 
to, the serpentine. The outcrop is sandstone and shales. This condition 
obtains for a distance of over twenty miles, covering a territory from one to 
five miles in width, being widest at a point taking in the town of Edna on 
the north and Arroyo Grande on the south. 

In many- places all along the break from the ocean to the Huasno are 
to be found outcrops of bituminous sandstone and seepages of asphaltum at 
the upper end of the Arroyo Grande valley, where the San Lucia range inter- 
sects the low hills that cross the lower end of the San Luis valley. The rib 
of serpentine has intruded, or the sand and shale formation has been folded 
over it. 

As a proof of this the writer located a well almost a mile south of the 
serpentine on a chalk rock and shale formation, and at a depth of 1,450 feet 
found the serpentine underlying while the serpentine, where it shows on 
the surface, was dipping to the north. We abandoned this well and moved 
a mile south on the same shale formation. This well is now nearly 1,700' feet 
deep and still in the shale. 

The Perpetual Oil Company • controls 3,000 acres, covering this and the 
field extending from Arroyo Grande on the west to Tar Springs "Banche on the 
east. Beyond this in the Huasno country a well is being drilled by Mr. 



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Carry in Stock a Complete Line of 

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DRILLING RIGS and OIL WELL SUPPLIES 

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PACIFIC MINIW, .v oil. REPORTER 



.Squires on the Porter Ranchc. A well is also being drilled in Sim/ canyon 
by wnr Los Angeles people. 

At Oilport, where the t'.ilifo- nm Refineries, I. id., is Building 

a big refinery and wharf on San Lnia bay, the Tiber nil ('onipnnv owns ninety- 
two a- ><£ tin- refinery si t *•, anil 443 acre* adjoining it on tin- east. 

i Company owns 'J.'j:w 

Tne company is drilling a well at thia time and is over 2,000 feet deep, 

aul it ia> lai mi i ; up for a g"»4 well. AdjoiwiBe the Associated on the easl 

in thr T'nion Oil Company's tract of 1,50(1 acres. Next to the fjnioh on the 

•he Tiber Oil Company Owns I, and lias one w. II pi, 

barrels a day, and is just finishing Xo. 'J, which is a better well than No. 1. 
The Tib«r now has an assurance of a production amounting to _'*i.onn barrels 
a mwswli from these two wells. The rig for \... :: Is m the ''ground, and the 
company will continue to drill in wells until it lias a produciion thai will 
justify building a pipe, line three miles long to its own landing on San Luis 
bay, and a switch to the railroad, which runs through this property. 

East of the Tiber, on the break about 2 miles distant, the Oak Park oil 
Company has a well 2,300 feet deep in ten-inch casing, and is in the hydro- 
carbon shale. R. M. Smith is the manager of this company and deserves 
great credit for the work on the well. A mile east of the Oak Park Com- 
pany the Crystal Oil Company is drilling, H. .T. Abies, manager. The com- 
pany is backed by the Newloves of Santa Maria. The well is about 1,500 
deep, and a good showing has been made. 

East and north of the Crystal the Logan Oil Company has a well about 
1,600 feet deep, and has a seepage of oil and is in a good formation. Billy 
Logan is the manager. 

About two miles south and east of the Logan Oil Company the California- 
Xewlove Oil Company, H. J. Abies, manager, and William Newlove, president, 
is setting up a rig on the Warner Ranch, one mile from Arroyo Grande. It 
is a good location and oil should be obtained. 

The natural advantages in the Arroyo Grande field are apparent. With 
two railroads and the ocean front, transportation is assured. The refinery 
now building will make a home market for large quantities of oil. 

The Tiber wells are only 1,400 feet to the bottom of the sand, and wells 
can be drilled very cheaply. McC. 



COALINGA. 



Have you seen our 

CALIFORNIA DIAMOND BX 

Casing and Drive Pipe? It's the 
thing for deep wells. Made in fol- 
lowing sizes and weights, and 
carried in stock at all our stores 



Size 

5^ inches 
6^4 inches 
6^8 inches 
%y± inches 



CASING 

Weight 

20 lbs. 
20 lbs. 
20 lbs. 
28 lbs. 






Size Weight 

954 inches 33 lbs. 

n0 inches 40 lbs. .,.. 

\iV 2 inches 40 lbs'. 



■ 



jDRIVE^ 

Size 
4^ inches 



Weight 

i S lbs' 



-- , 



[Special Correspondence.] 

Work is progressing very favorably on the No. 5 well of the California 
Diamond Oil Company. It is now over 1,300 feet deep in ten-inch casing. 
The other four wells of the company are producing regularly and uninter- 
ruptedly. There is considerable excitement in the southern part of the field, 
and this company has procured some extensive holdings which are very favor- 
ably located. The company owns 1,280 acres in this newly proven territory, 
which is a valuable acquisition to its already large holdings in this field 
and Sunset. 

The various wells of the California Monarch and California and New 
York Oil Companies are producing as usual. The oil is being taken as fast 
as it is brought to the surface by one of the marketing companies at a good 
price. 

The West Coalinga Oil Company has decided to start drilling at once on 
its well No. 1 and will spud in at once. 

The Lucile Oil Company 's well No. 1 is still flowing ' steadily and is a 
very good well. 

Considerable excitement is being created in town over the increased 
activity in the Southern Coalinga field. Several small deals have been put 
through and a large amount of land has been relocated. Several wells arc 
being put down in this neighborhood, proving up of many square miles. 

The Esperanza Oil & Land Company is to put down a well on its property 
on Section 30-21-15, and has its derrick finished and rigged preparatory to 
spudding in for its No. 1 well. 

The Manchester Oil Company, located on Section 30-21-15, has its well 
No. 1 down 400 feet in its 12^-inch casing, and is making good progress. 
This well is about two and one-half miles south of the Lucile, and much nearer 
the outcropping of the oil sands. A good well should be brought in in a com- 
paratively short time. The company has about 300 acres of land and if a 
good well is brought in will be a valuable acquisition to the MeCreary prop- 
erties. 

The Commercial Petroleum Company is putting down its well No. 9. 
This well was spudded in about the first of the month and is making very 
good progress. The company owns a valuable piece of property in Section 
31-19-15, situated east of the California Monarch Company's well No. 1, which 
is, the best well in the West Coalinga field. 

. The Coalinga Petroleum Company is putting down its well No. 3, which 
will give the company a very busint'ss-TSke 'appearance 

It is 
Nos. 7 and 

The M. K. & T. Oil Company is still making its usual good progress on its 
well No. 2. A plant consisting of several tanks was placed on *tbej property 
to demonstrate the usefulness of the Qhiejigo toiler Compound, which softens 
the water as it runs into the tanks, saving & great expense, in repairs on. its 
boilers. 

It is understood that considerable wild-catting will be done in the near 
future about six miles west of town and considerable distance back of the 
main sands to determine the merits ^f a sand that runs through that region. 

In our last issue your correspondent put in the following article; ' 'The 
Tavern Oil Company has its well No. 3 down 300 feet in its 12%-rneh casing." 
This article should have read the Avon Oil Company instead of Tavern, and 
very good progress is being made on it. 



THE NATIONAL SUPPLY COMPANY 

117 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

BRANCH STORES 

Coalinga, Cal. Bakersfleld, Cal. Orcutt, Cal. 



TUBULAR 




Large Dome 
Dry Steam 
Assured 
Full 
Capacity 




3 ' 

" 

• 



T"-™"— ttt^ 



Easy access 

to every 

part for 

Cleaning, 

Examination 

and 

Repairs 



Slock of Boilers from 25 



-* 



reported that the Zier Oil Company is going to put down Its wells 
id 8 with the commencement of the 1 New Year. 



Made of best Flange Tested Steel. Tubes of best American manufacture and of 
standard gauge; Rivets of best quality; Fixtures heavy and durable Every 
boiler complete.-including following fixtures and fittings: Half arch fritat, coroV 
plete with fire and ash doors 17x17 inches, with draft dampers ; anchor bolts 
for front gates and bearers ; rear arch bars ; cleanout door and frame ; wall- 
plates and rollers ; smoke stack and guy wire ; pop safety valve ; steam gauge 
and syphon ; water column of large capacity, complete with water gauge and 
three gauge cocks ; blow-off cock ; feed valve and check valve with nipples. 
Portable outfits and everything required for drilling; or boring 
Test wells. Brass Goods, Fittings and Valves of all descriptions. 

Write for prices 

R. H. HERROX CO., affiliated with the 

OILiWELL SUPPLY CO. 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

212 North Los Angeles St. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Ill Townsend St. 



IO 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER- 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



Published Seml-Monthly 



The Oil and Mining Authority of the Pacific Coast 



EDWARD S. EASTMAN 
MARIA R. WINN 
KARL R. EASTMAN 



Managing Editor 

Secretary- Treasurer 

Field Manager 



OFFICE AND EDITORIAL ROOMS 

Suite 37 Saint Mungo Building, 1300 Golden Gate Avenue 

San Francisco, California 

TELEPHONE WEST 6677 

Subscription price, $2.00 per year, in advance, to any part of the United States, Canada 
or Mexico. Add $1.00 for foreign subscriptions. 

Entered at the post-office at San Francisco under application {or second-class matter. 



THE FUTURE OF SIERRA COUNTY. 



One of the greatest events in the history of Sierra county is the coming 
of the "Western Pacific Railway, which runs close to its borders just to the 
north of the mineralized zone, which is one of the richest gold-bearing sections 
of the State. This railway, which will be completed within the next two years, 
will open up a vast section of valuable mining property to the advantages of 
cheap transportation throughout the counties of Sierra, Plumas and Butte, 
but its advantages to Sierra county are almost incalculable. Hundreds of 
mines will soon be in operation which heretofore have been too far away from 
transportation facilities to allow their economical operation. Again, it is 
difficult to interest capital in an isolated district, even though its resources 
may be richer by far than those in a section of the country more easily reached. 

To reach the rich mineral zone of Sierra county there are now three avail- 
able routes. One, and that usually taken, is a drive of practically seventy-five 
miles over an unusually mountainous road from Nevada City. The second, 
and that taken for the most part by freight teams, is sixty miles from Truckee, 
which, too, is extremely mountainous. A third is via narrow gauge railway 
from Boca to Boyalton, from which point it is a comparatively short distance, 
but the uncertain service over this route makes it the one least used by 
travelers, and the exorbitant freight charges on account of the transfer at 
Boca is prohibitive. The Western Pacific places Downieville, the county seat 
of Sierra county, within about fifteen miles of a great trans-continental railway. 

There are, in Sierra county to-day, over 400 stamps lying idle on account 
of their isolated situation being unfavorable to the investment of capital. 
There are, to be true, several properties, such as the Sierra Buttes and Empire, 
in Sierra county, and the Plumas Eureka, just across the border in Plumas 
county, which have been successfully developed and are being operated con- 
tinually with great profit, but this is more owing to the great extent of their 
rich ore bodies and to good management than to any other condition, for these 
companies, like many less fortunate, have been compelled to haul heavy machin- 



ery and supplies over the long haul from Truckee or to pay the exorbitant 
freight rates via Boca. 

Of all the mining centers in California none can surpass- in number or 
richness the big., quartz ledges that have been found in Sierra county. Since 
the days of '49 this -district has given up untold riches in gold from its placer 
beds, which are still rich. Great veins of gold-producing ore traverse the 
country. 

One mine, the Sierra Prtittes, has taken 'out over $16,000,000; this mine 
and the Plumas Eureka have paid over $28,000,000 in dividends to their 
stockholders. 

Placer mining is still carried on extensively in the county, but, owing to 
the debris law, has been greatly retarded for the past twenty years. Yet 
more than a quarter of a million dollars in placer gold passes through the 
express office at Downieville, the county seat, every year; besides a vast amount 
that is taken out individually. 

The county fortunately possesses water and timber in abundance, which, 
together with its ideal climate, makes it one of the most favorable mining 
localities to be found in the State. Unlimited water power is available at 
all points. The abundant snow and rainfall furnishes an ample supply of 
water, which the precipitous nature of the country renders available under 
any pressure desired, with a reasonable length of ditch. The timber of the 
country is mostly pine, spruce, fir and sugar pine, all of the finest quality. 

The main ridge of the Sierra Nevadas crosses the eastern part of the 
country from south to north. Several spurs from the main ridge traverse 
the country from east to west, forming the watersheds of the four principal 
streams, which form the drainage system of the western part. These streams 
consist of the Middle Yuba river on the south, with Wolf creek, Kanaka creek 
and Oregon creek as tributaries ; the North Yuba near the center, with the 
North Pork, South Pork, Middle Pork and East Branch adjoining it near 
Downieville, and Canyon creek and Slate creek on the north. 

The quartz belt crossing the country is twenty miles in width, with a 
trend to the northwest. This belt consists of several distinct zones, distin- 
guishable by the character of the ore and the nature of the country rock. The 
most notable of these zones passes through the central portion of the country, 
near Sierra City, and runs northwesterly through the Gold Lake region to 
and beyond the famous Plumas-Eureka mine just across the Plumas county 
line. The quartz veins of this zone are situated within and along each side 
of a belt of quartz porphyry about one mile wide. These veins generally have 
a northwest strike and a dip of about fifty degrees to the northeast. Two 
miles east of this zone is another, on the contact between the slates of the 
west and the granite on the east. Most of this contact, however, is covered 
with gravel deposits. A third zone crosses the country in a northwesterly 
direction, between Downieville and Sierra City. The zone is ten miles in 
width and consists of alternate bands of clay slates, quartzite and porphyry. 
The ledges occur within the slate or between the slates and porphyry. < 

West of this zone is a band of serpentine passing through Forest City, 
Goodyear Bar and Poker Flat. Most of the discoveries on this serpentine con- 
tact have been made by drift miners working under the lava-capped ridges, 
but many valuable discoveries have been made in the neighborhood of Alle- 
ghany, where Kanaka creek has cut, been prospected. 

While gold is the principal product of the mining section of the county, 
there are many valuable deposits of iron and copper. Lack of transportation 
facilities have retarded the development of these mineral deposits. 



Hammond 
Iron Works 

Warren, Pa. 

U. S. A. 

Builders of 

Steel Tanks 

of the 

Highest 

Grade 




Stills 
Condensors 
Agitators 
General 
Oil Refinery- 
Work 



SALES AGENTS 

Herman Nieter 

29 Broadway 
New York. 

Krumbhaar&Aiken 

201 Defiegre Building 
New Orleans 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



ii 



The lumbering inten nee in the eastern part of the county, 

which on Railroad, connecting with the 

■tic at Boca, other important interests of that end of the county 
i .irving an.l stock raising. 

gbany, near Forest City, in this county, have attracted 

than ordinary attention. The principal mines to date in this particular 

district are the Tightner and the Oriental. A four-fifths interest in the Tight- 

ner mine was sold some little time ago for ash, It is now valued 

■ ml millions. A year ago it could have been purchased for a few thou- 

:.dlars. More than $300,000 in values has already lieen taken out of it, 

with the ore bodies constantly getting greater and richer. While this particular 

■t will not b by the railway as that in which the 

Empire Hold Mines. Ltd.. Sierra Buttes, Plumas-Eureka and others arc located, 

it will prove of much In 'in tit. every part of the county being placed in closer 

touch with transportation facilities than ever before. The coming of the 

rn Pacific is attracting millions of capital for the development of Sierra 

county's rich mines, and a thousand stamps will l.e dropping here within the 

next few years 



EXORBITANT PRICES INJURIOUS TO TRADE. 



Recently there has been a great many references made to the low price 
paid for California oil iu comparison to that paid for the Pennsylvania product. 
At the present time the output of the Pennsylvania fields brings a ready price 
of $1.56 per barrel at the wells. There are not a few who actually believe 
that the entire output of California should bring quite as much. 

To the great majority of people "oil is oil" without a defining clause. 
Relative value, cost of production, or general average of the wells, are never 
considered. It is petroleum oil, it is argued, and should bring as mueh in one 
place as in another. 

California petroleum oils should possibly bring a greater price than that 
now prevailing, but the man who expects to see it selling for $1.56 per barrel 
is likely to become an object of disappointed expectations. In the meantime 
a great many thrifty oil producers will make good profits by selling oil at a 
price not exceeding to any great extent that now prevailing. There will be 
a steady strengthening in oil prices from this time on, but Pennsylvania prices 
will probably never prevail in California — and there is no reason why they 
should. 

In the State of Pennsylvania there are thousands of wells now being 
daily pumped that do not produce over two and three barrels each. The gen- 
eral average production of the wells of that State is not over ten barrels. 
Hundreds of leases have reverted after having declined in' production until 
they can no longer be ope'rated to profit by companies, but which are pumped 
by individual owners — often with hand pumps — by which a frugal living is 
often made; In other instances a large number of wells are pumped by a 
single power plant, thus reducing the cost of operating. A ten-barrel well in 
Pennsylvania is considered to be a pretty good well; a twenty-five-barrel well 
is akin to a gold mine. This is simply because the oil is particularly valuable, 
the man with a two-barrel well being enabled to make day wages by hand- 
pumping it. 

The oil produced in Pennsylvania brings a good price because its natural 
constituents make it of a particular value over the product of almost any 
other country where oil in quantities is produced. It is a well-known fact 



that the refined products of a barrel of Pennsylvania oil nets more th 
a barrel. Every drop of it is worked up into very valuable products, 
the very base of the nil. paratfine, brings Ihe refiners from $8 to $25 a hut 
weight, according to the quality. There is absolutely no loss. It is a quality 
of oil for which there is always a great demand because there is never enough 
iply tho demand. Producers of oil in Pennsylvania say they should have 
at least $5 per barrel for their oil — but do not expect to get it. 



The general average production of oil wells in California is approximately 
sixty barrels. A well that produces less than fifty barrels on the start is eon 
siilered a dry hole and is usually abandoned. Much of the oil produced in 
California is subject to the refining process by means of which all of the val- 
uable by-products obtained from the Pennsylvania oil are secured, with the 
exception of parafline. The base of California oil is asphaltum, now worth 
about 60 cents per hundred weight, or $12 per ton. About one-fifth of the 
amount of by-prodiictfl secured from Pennsylvania oil is secured from the 
product of California. It is just as good' in quality, but far less in quantity. 
California oil is particularly adapted for fuel purposes, for which it is of 
the greatest value. 

Three and one-half barrels of oil is said to equal a ton of coal in heat 
units. Coal delivered at San Francisco is worth $7 per ton. This would 
make the value of oil no less than $2 per barrel if taken in comparison to coal. 
But no one expects to sell oil for $2 per barrel in California; at least not for 
a considerable period of time. There would be too many quickly created 
millionaires. For instance, one well in Santa Barbara county produced a mil- 
lion and a half barrels of oil, which would have netted the company no less 
than $3,000,000 at $2 a barrel. Many another well has produced a half a 
million barrels of oil — in fact, it is the very fact that wells are large pro- 
ducers and that the production of the State can be rapidly increased at will 
by the drilling of more wells that keeps the price nominal. And it will, 
fortunately, continue to remain norminal as long as the present favorable 
conditions are maintained. 

We do not suppose for a moment that California oil will be much longer 
sold at less than 30 cents per barrel, for the simple reason that the demand is 
increasing at a rate that promises to equal the supply in a short time. It 
may also be truly said that the supply is increasing at a rate that promises 
to exceed all possible demand for several years to come. It remains to be 
seen, however, which one is to exceed the other. 

Price is almost always regulated by the old rule of supply and demand. 
It has, thus far, been thus regulated in California. Our present supply exceeds 
the demand, and if such a condition continues the price of oil will remain 
nominal, but high enough to fully equal in profit, if not in actual price per 
barrel, the output of any other known field. Five barrels of oil can be pro- 
duced in California as cheaply as can one barrel in Pennsylvania. There is 
big money in California oil- at 30 cents per barrel. There are many com- 
panies that have paid good dividends from the sale of oil at 15 cents per 
barrel. There are other companies that could not pay dividends with oil at 
even a dollar a barrel. There is much in the management and location of the 
properties. 

Altogether we believe that producers should not expect too high a price 
for their oil. At a nominal figure its uses will grow and extend to every part 
of the globe, creating a great and permanent demand. This will maintain good 
prices indefinitely. Indeed, it is through nothing save nominal prices that 



JLvAOY MAIVUFACTURIIVa COMPANY 



Manufacturers of 



Stei^l Water Pipe 
General Sheet Iron 
Works 




Oil Well Casing 
Oil stills 



OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 

: 

Works : Cor. New Main and Date Streets, Baker Block P. O. Box 231, Station C. Telephone Main 196 

-Office, 334 floFth JVIain Street, Iios Angeles, Cal. 



12 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



has already extended the use of California fuel oil to Japan, the Hawaiian 
Islands,- Chile,- British Columbia, Pana'may and' our various coast' 'States, where 
it has entered' into successful competition with coal, mainly on account of its 
being more economical. Our heart is, .with the producer, but we would .dislike 
to see him "bite off his nose to spite his .face-;" A fair price to. iboth producer 
and consumer will be better in the long run. 



CALIFORNIA. 

Railroad to . Hornet Mine. . 

Ground lias been' broken for ills extension of the Iron Mountain. Railroad 
from the Iron Mountain mine to the Hornet mine in, Shasta ". county. The 
Hornet is one- 'of tiie incest' valuable holdings of the Moirntain\C/dp'per Company. 
The new piece''of Toad Will be three miles in length and wiK'-exteird up Boulder 
creek. The preliminary work has been done during the' past, month, and this 
morning the actual' work of grading and construction began. The Mountain 
Copper Company is also making preparations for a resumption of work at the 
Keswick smelter, which has been. idle for two years and which was partly dis- 
mantled and moved to Martinez.. General Manager "Wright has been at Kes- 
wick during the past week,- and arranged for surveys about the old smelter 
for, a new, plant whieli will . treat ore from the Hornet mine. 



, - Purchase. Valuable, Copper Property. 
■ i-uA mining deal ' of . no -small- magnitude has just been closed whereby two 
Eiversiders become interested: in a big eopper mining deal. They are J. S. 
Batkin and H. M. Bennett,, who.. with Bol King of Los Angeles, "Scotty's" 
partner and -backer,' have -bought- valtuable copper properties in San Bernardino 
county. This consists, of 180 :acres, -comprising the entire Von Trigger town- 
site and nine claims, ad joining the.piroperty and the California Gold and Mining 
Company in the Exchequer mining district. This property is located on both 
sides of: the Santa -Pe- Bailroad. .and' is believed to be equally as high as the 
"Cram" properties, in whijeli .a considerable number of Riversiders are in- 
terested.. It is the intention.: of -the purchasers to develop the property along 
the best lines. :■ j 



Activity in Yucaipe Valley. 

The discoverers of the, rich mining ledge in Yucaipe valley are preparing 
to .erect a ten-stamp mill for the development of their property. The ledge 
is located in Coldgate canyon, immediately south of the Benson ranch and 
about a mile from. the nearest, water, The owners of the mine are trying to 
purchase water from the Benson ranch and if they do there is talk of a town- 
site being laid out. A large number of miners have been attracted to that 
section of the country, but, so far no additional discoveries have been made. 



Murchie Gold Mines Con. 
The uprise to the shaft from the -800-foot level of the Murchie Gold 
Mines Consolidated is progressing very satisfactorily and will' now be com- 
pleted within a few weeks. Values continue, to show up remarkably- rich in 
the lower levels of this mine where the work ,bf blocking out-: and exposing 
the large ore bodies continue uninterruptedly. The twentyTStainp -mill - is 
running night and day turning out good values, the output of the mine having 
increased greatly since the additional ten stamps were installed.; ^ 



Empire Gold Mines Ltd. ' '•', '" ". (i 

We have an unconfirmed report from Gold Valley, Sierra county,,. £hat..:the 
work of reconstructing the twenty-five-stanip, mill of the Empire; ; Gold , Mines 
Limited has. been completed and that the stamps will at once .commence to 
drop. During .the temporary shut down i on the mill large quantities of ; rich 
ore has been mined and .blocked out, sufficient, to,, keep, the njijj,, running, (for a 
long time. Values continue to show up well in the upper tunnel and- in. the 
lower levels "where work is now being concentrated. It is understood that 
improvements are about to be made upon the chlorination plant in order to 
gain the very best results. It will be understood that the concentrates from. 
this property are .all worked up at the mine, saving the expenses of shipping 
them, over the existing costly transportation routes. The Western Pacifie 
Railway, now building, and which will be completed within a period from one 
to two years, will run within a distance of only seven miles from this valuable 
property, giving it at once the advantage of cheaper transportation. 



Murchie Extension. 

Extensive development work is being done at three different points on 
the property of the Murchie Extension Mining Company near Nevada City, 
and the very best results are being obtained. At the bottom of one 300- 
foot shaft at one of the locations the entire face of the ledge give an average 
assay of $375 per ton. The ledge is widening out rapidly and is all free- 
milling ore. An air compressor is being installed at the mouth of this shaft 
to facilitate the further development of the property, which has already 
passed the experimental state and can easily be reckoned as one of the forth- 
coming great mines of Nevada county. 



Extend Tunnel on Jennie Lind. 
A new plan of operation has been decided upon by the directors of the 
Jenny Lind gravel mine in Nevada county, and an old tunnel just above the 
present tunnel will be extended. It is believed that this tunnel will strike 
the old gravel channel that exists there, and it will make the extraction of 
the gravel much- less expensive. Under the present system all the returns 
are eaten up by expenses, and with the new plan in operation the gravel may 
be worked at a profit. The change is made upon the advice of Superintendent 
Bartell and other capable gravel miners. 



Fortunes in a Few Days 



i 



. 



Have you good Nevada stocks? Have you reaped your share 
of the fortunes that have been made out of the good Nevada stocks 
M the past two weeks? We have had the greatest market here on 
the San Francisco" Stock Exchanges ever known in the history of 
the mining business of this -city. More shares have been dealt in 
each day than ever before. Some days a million to a million and 
a quarter shares are bought and sold. Stocks, have advanced 5 
cents, 10 cents, 50 cents and in some cases as high as $2 per share 
per day. I have had a few customers who have become rich in the 
past few days. I have one old -gray-beard thaf'bought 1,000 shares 
of Mohawk about a year ago at 17 cents per share, or $170. I have 
repeatedly offered him by wire the past few days $15,000 spot cash 
for that 1,000 shares of stock. I just received a cable from Korea 
to sell 5,000 shares; of Red Top at $4 per share, the market price. 
I sold this man that stock at a few cents a'sh-are about two years 
ago. Silver Pick has jumped from 20 cents to above $1.50. Jumbo, 
in the past few days, has gone to. above $4; dozens of ,others have 
advanced to prices that have' made fortunes for their 'holders, and 
the market has just started. Why these prices? Because there are 
the. most fabulous ore bodiesdiEhirtdrthese stocks;. fite^aetaathullion 
is .coming from the mines and is being converted into gold-dollars. 

J. E. KERR, Suite 2, 

Telephone WEST 6454 



The boom has just really begun in Goldfield. Bullfrog has never 
had a boom, but the boom lightning is now striking in spots in 
that camp. A few stocks have already advanced 25 cents to 75 
cents a share. 

I know the mines, I know the men who control them, and I 
know the market. I know what to buy and as a result of this 
knowledge I have made for myself and my friends enormous profits 
on good Nevada stocks. 

If you have idle money, put it to work. If you have it in the 
bank, you get about 3 or 4 per cent per year. We always make 
more than that every month, and the past few weeks have made a 
great many times that amount each week. I am a member of two 
Stock Exchanges, and can fill your orders promptly and satisfac- 
torily. During such a market as we have now, don't wait to write 
a letter, for stocks are constantly advancing and the delay oi a; 
letter may cause you to pay a high price for your stock. 

As to my reliability, I refer you to the editor of this paper ; also'- 

the Germania National Bank of this city, also the California Safe 

Deposit-andrfErust Company; can:- give a number of-jahgf:^g£efenees 

if desired: - - , <* 

if- ',--•'• 
_ • . - 

:,'-..----'i 






SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



PACll-K MINING & OIL REPORTKK 



Good Progress at Oold Flat Mine. 
i The progress which ! Flat mino, which i« under the 

lencr of W. 1*. M ban gratifying to the company, 

aeph Weisberd, the president 

the property and axpri 

-k which has been .lour Binee the 

mine few months ago. Mr. Weisbcin has again lofl for New 

York ■ certain plans which lie has in view for the working of the 

min»' on a larger scale and to attend to some private bnsi ai 

■lie improvements wiiich will greatly add to the expedition of 

develop k is the purchase of a now air * ipressor ami a full equip 

ment of drills; etc., for the mine 1 , "The, compressor is of tin- Nurwalk manu 

:ilt on the same plan as those in use at the Xorth Star ami 

It is one of t)if best made, ami will liavo a capacity 

r. which tl: thinks will servo for some time. The 

apable of furnishing power for twelve large machine 

drills. It is expect, d to arrive sonic time next month, when the work of 

installation will be immediately commenced. A number of drilling machines 
will also arrive at the same time. 

When the machinery has been installed the work of opening up the mine 
will go forward with increased speed. Already the shaft, whicb is in very 

hard roek. has been sunk to a depth of nearly two hundred feet below the 
level. A station has been oul at the 400, and when the machines are 
tor use. drifts will be turned from each side of the shaft. This will 
give the company 200 feet of "backs," and as all the ore taken out in the 
upper levels has been of high grade, and the vein continues in depth it is 
seen that the outlook for the company is exceedingly bright. 



NEVADA. 



Goldfleld District. 

One of the greatest deals in the history of Goldfleld has been consum- 
mated since the last issue of this journal. It is the consolidation of the famous 
Mohawk, the Jumbo, Red Top, and Laguna, by Messrs. Nixon and Wingfield 
into one great corporation, which will continue their development under one 
management. 

The new company will have a capitalization of $50,000,000, divided into 
5,000,000 shares of a par value of $10. Only such an amount of the capital 
stock as may be needed for the taking over of the merged companies will be 
issued for the present, the remainder being kept in the treasury for the acquisi- 
tion of more property, should such a course be deemed advisable. 

Shares of the consolidated company will be issued as follows, based upon 
the current value of the merged companies, viz.: 

Two million shares of consolidated company, par value $20,000,000, will 
be exchanged for 1,000,000 shares of the Mohawk Company, par value 
$1,000,000. 



Five hundred thousand shares of the eonsolt 

will be exchanged for i, res of Jumbo, 

Five hundred thousand slums of the .. .■otiipan v. par > 

$5,000,000, will bo exchanged for i.oiiii.iiihi ,.,.,i Top Gomfeanv, par 

value $1, 

Two hundred thousand shares ..i' ih,> eon-. ompnny, par value 

$2,000,0111), will be exchanged for l.iinii.iiiiii shares of Laguna, par value 
000, making a total of 3,800,000 shares oi the lonsolidated company 

$32,1 ,000, in exchange for I. '.mm shares ,.r the constituent companies in 

the proportions stated. 

in' the constituent companies She fjtjlhiwiijjj shares reniaii id in their 

m. treasuries: 

I .Key'. . ; .., 

MOHAWK ....,, . I 

JUMBO 800,000 ahari s 

RED TOP l £5,500 shares 

LAGUNA 1!)7,G0II Shares 

The shares of the consolidated company to lie exchanged lor this treasury 
stock in the proportions above stated, will be covered into the treasuries of 
the constituent companies as a part of their assets. 

These will amount in number to 842,270 shares. 

The expense of organization and for underwriting will not exel ed 350,000 
shares. 

The consolidated company thus equipped will have issued for its holdings 
and for organization a maximum of 3,450;000 shares of the par value of 
$34,500,000, of which 842,270 shares, par., value $8,422j7O0, will have been 
covered into the treasuries of the constituent companies. . 

All shareholders in the constituent companies or any of them will be 
given the privilege of exchanging their .shares of the consolidated oorapany 

on the basis above outlined for thirty days after the perfection of th 

ization. This basis will be adhered to without reference- to intervening fluctu- 
ations of the market value of shares. ■:■'..■ . ■ 

The consolidated company will be organized and equipped- for business 
on or before the 20th day of November, A. D. 1906; at which time a state 
ment of the acreage, nature of title and financial condition of each of the 
constituent companies will be given to the public. 

The autonomy of the constituent companies will not be affected or im- 
paired by the plan above outlined. , .. .. 

The directorate of the holding company will not exceed nine in number 
and will be chosen with a view to the best interests of ail shareholders. 



As the result of meetings recently held in this City between Oeorge'"8. i ' 
Nixon and George Wingfield, who effected the $50,000,000 combination of the 
Mohawk, Jumbo, Bed Top and Laguna, the mines; mills and water power 
lying between the Mohawk and January has been secured for the big com- 
bination. 




anhattan, Nevada 

The World's Wonder Gold Camp 



The Manhattan Nevada Gold Mines Co. owns and operates extensive and valuable 
properties that seem destined to make Manhattan's greatest mines. • • 

A limited amount of treasury stock in this company is now offered at 

THIRTY CENTS PER SHARE 

Every share of stock is fully protected by our $3,000,000 Trust or Guaranty Fund. 

Under the same management as the Murchie Gold Mines Con., the Empire 
Gold Mines Ltd., the California and New York Oil Co., the California Monarch 
Oil Co., and other famous dividend payers. 

As an absolutely safe and wonderfully profitable investment this stock is unrivaled. 

Write at once for- illustrated prospectus and six month's free subscription to the Invest- 
ment Herald. ..,,,., 



A. L. WISNER & CO 

%^nkers Fiscal Agents 



• *"*\ -*^ 



- 



8© Wall Street, New York 






14 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



il 1 > i U'J 



The price paid for tlie combination property of ten full claims and three 
fractions, aggregating 200 acres, twenty stamp mills and extensive power 
rights, has not been given out. But as the property, of which a few thousand 
feet only have been worked, has paid $788,000 in twenty-five successive 
monthly dividends and produced ore to the value of $1,150,000 in the last nine 
months, the consideration was undoubtedly large. 

The newly acquired property may ultimately become a subsidiary of the 
Goldfield Consolidated, but it is understood that a new corporation, with a 
capitalization of $10,000,000, of which $4,000,000 will be placed in the treasury, 
is to be organized by Nixon and Wingfield at once. This will probably result 
in the ultimate exchange of the stock of the new corporation for G-oldfieid 
Consolidated stock and a single management of the neighboring properties. 
Meanwhile it is claimed, and the claims are based on the present earnings of 
the combination property, that with the danger of expensive litigation removed 
and the extension of the milling capacity by the addition of new units the 
new corporation can earn $1,000,000 a year on the proposed stock issue. 



The Hayes-Monnette lease on the Mohawk has caught the ore body at 
the 270-foot station and sinking has been stopped. There is enough ore in 
sight with this strike to keep all the men they can work busy until the expira- 
tion of the lease with the end of the present year, and drifting and stoping 
will begin at once. Three hoists will be worked, and even with these there 
will still be enough ore left in sight after the lease expires to make several 
millionaires. The catching of the ore in this manner indicates that the ledge 
has spread out with depth and as it is in every way as good as in the upper 
levels, it adds just that much to the wealth of the mine and to the wealth of 
Messrs. Nixon and Wingfield, to whom it will revert as soon as the lease 
expires. 

James E. Keelyn of Evanston, 111., who, with his associates, has acquired 
extensive interests in this district and is in San Francisco arranging for the 
installing on the Little Florence Mining Company a lease near the main work- 
ing of the Florence Mining Company, including a forty-horsepower hoist, com- 
pressor and air drills, the cost of which will approximate $7,500. The showing 
procured upon this property, it is believed, will justify the installation of a com- 
plete plant, and development will be prosecuted npon a liberal scale. The 
company has already completed a shaft to a depth of 216 feet and has drifted 
some 300 feet. The operators predict a future similar to the Beilly lease. 



Drifting is being continued on the vein of the United Tonopah and Gold- 
field mines with gratifying results. There now seems to be every promise that 
the mine will fully come up to the expectations of its owners and will soon 
be numbered among the rich producers of this wonderful district. It is 
understood that the shaft will be continued from the 200-foot level as soon 
as the hoist shall have been erected, which no doubt will open up further 
great ore bodies as has already been stated. 

The work of sinking the shaft on the Bugle group of the Central Tonopah 
and Goldfield mines at Gold|ield is progressing very favorably, and the bottom 
of the shaft is showing up well. Judging from the rich strikes which have 
been made at either city qf this property, there seems to be every assurance 
that high-grade ore will be struck at no great depth. The Bugle group is 
one of the most favorably located mining properties in the entire Goldfield 
district, and the prospects for a most brilliant future are of the best. 



The building of the new mill for the Florence has been commenced. ."The. 
contractors, a well-known firm of constructing engineers, have promised that 
the work will be rushed. The presence of copper has interfered with the 
company's plans, as the ordinary eyaniding process has been found impracti- 
cable. The company has experimented for the past year and has expended 
a large amount of money in tests. 'Recently about three carloads of -ore were 
shipped to Denver for tests in the . laboratories. The "result proves that a 
simple method of reduction will return satisfactory results up to 95 per cent 
of the assay value. 

The capacity of the initial plant will run-to 100 tons a day and the cost 
of constructing this will be $100,000. The treatment will include amalgamation, 
concentration and eyaniding and the further treatment of slimes. The power 
will be electric, and wherever power is used individual motors will be em- 
ployed. There is enough ore blocked out in the Florence to employ a mill of 
100 tons daily capacity for years to come. 



Tonopah District. 
Sixty stamps of the Tonopah Company 's 100-stanip mill at Miller 's Siding 
were put in commission this week, and the 'other forty stamps will be drop- 
ping before the end of the month. There has been a great deal of vexatious 
delay on account of the difficulty in securing some missing parts of the machin- 
ery from the foundries, but everything has been delivered or is in transit, 
and by the first of December it is probable that the immense reduction works 
will be pounding out ore at the rate of 400 tons a day. — Tonopah Miner. 

Postmaster L. L. Mushett of Tonopah announced to-day that plans are 
practically completed to put a wireless service in this camp in direct com- 
munication with San Francisco. The service will be a branch of the Occi- 
dental and Oriental "Wireless Telegraph Company, using the De Forest system. 
Mushett has been working for this for months. He says that the coast service 
will come here direct and be distributed to other camps. The wireless system 
will be of great advantage in reporting the stock market and such messages 
will be given the right of way. 



Bullfrog District. 

In the shaft of the Rhyolite Townsite, at 150 feet, the formation is getting 
solid. The shaft will be sunk to 200 feet and then crosscutting will be started 
for the ledge, which, it is estimated, will be reached in thirty days. A gasoline 
hoist has just been installed at the Townsite. 

The Zeigler Bullfrog is a new corporation and little work has been done 
thus far on the company's property, although the locations are among the 
oldest in the district. Surface assays run as high as $37 per ton in .gold. 
Nineteen assays averaged $5.54 in gold per ton on the surface. One particular 
lead has been opened up, showing a width of eight feet. 

It is proposed by the large stockholders of the Mayflower and Starlight 
mining companies to consolidate the properties of the two companies. Those 
interested say that the statement that the Bullfrog Croesus would be in the 
consolidation is incorrect. 

The crosscut from the seventy-foot level of the Skookum shaft is in about 
fifteen feet. The formation here is a blue lime, in which lead ore appears occa- 
sionally. This is a good indication. The equipment of the mine will soon 
be first-class. 

The crosscut from the 100-foot level at the Gold Bar South Extension is 
cutting into the ledge at the 150-foot point. Good values appearing in the 
face. 



It has been learned upon competent authority that the Ohio Tonopah has 
been taken over by the West End Consolidated Mining Company. Formal 
announcement to this effect is daily expected from the : East. Negotiations 
have been going on for some time and it has been known for a week that the 
-deal was settled. As already announced, the further conversion of MaeNamara 
stock for West End Consolidated securities was definitely suspended last 
night. P. J. Cadogan, a member of the local exchange has received a message 
from the secretary of the West End Company to this effect. It is also stated 
that no further effort will be made by the West End people to secure the 
control of the MaeNamara mine, as it has been discovered that the veins of 
the latter apex in the ground of the West End. — Tonopah Bonanza. 



Development continues steadily on the China Nevada, and a new shaft is 
being sunk on the Hongkong claim. Surface assays across 100 feet of the 
vein run $4.20 in gold per ton. Depth, it is thought, will prove up much 
greater values. At present the shaft has attained a depth of twelve feet, 
the whole bottom being in quartz. 

. Judge Ezra Norris, J. E. Bryan and F. H. Stickney, who own the Horse- 
shoe group, a short distance southeast of the Mayflower, have let a contract 
for sixty feet of tunneling. The tunnel is now in sixty feet, and is expected 
to tap the Mayflower ledge at the 150-fbbt point. There are twelve claims 
in the group. 

The Bullfrog Gold Coin has struck ore in an open cut on its Coin No. 1 
and No. 2 claims. An assay recently made gave a return of $22 to the ton 
from ore very similar in character, General Manager Thatcher states, to 
that found at the Mayflower. Three and a half feet of the material have 
been uncovered and the width of the ledge has not yet been proved. 

Sinking is being continued at the Black Spar with two shifts. Shaft No. 
1 is down 132 feet and the drift from the 100-foot level south on the vein is 
being pushed ahead. The crosscut west from the 100 is being further ex- 
tended and the material being penetrated is constantly improving in character. 
If the ground in the shaft continues reasonably good it is the purpose to reach 
the 200-foot point by the 10th of next month. — Bullfrog Miner. 

Work of drifting and sinking on the property of the Bullfrog Fortuna 
mine at Bullfrog continues uninterruptedly. Several rich veins of ore have 
already been encountered which give every assurance of increasing in extent 
and values as further depth is attained. Parties who have examined this 
property state that they believe that it is destined to become one of the 
richest mines in this famous district. 



Manhattan. 

Manhattan, Nev., November 17,1906. 
[Special Correspondence.] 

.. Some remarkable assays have been received from ore taken from the im- 
mense ledges at the new copper strike, twenty -five miles west of here. From 
the Griffin strike a few days ago, a sample was taken that returned 54.4 per 
cent copper and $120 in silver. Several assays have been taken showing values 
in copper above twenty-five per cent. The ledges are large and strong, and 
from the present excitement, it is quite evident that the camp has come to 
stay; Two townsites are now doing business, Copperfield and Superior. The 
roads are lined with wagons loaded with various supplies for stores, frame 
buildings, etc. 

Two shafts are being sunk on the large ledges, both down about fifteen 
feet to date, and the values seem to be better than ever. 

The copper strike seems bound to boom Manhattan. Many visitors of the 
strike are coming into this camp, and things generally are picking up. The 
summer dullness is about passed, and everything shows signs of great activity. 
Several substantial strikes have been made which stamp the camp as a stayer, 
and another six months will no doubt develop some of the best mines in 
the State. 

On the Independence No. 1 of the Manhattan Independence Mining Com- 
pany a four-foot vein of ore was encountered a day or two ago that fairly 
teems with free gold. Some of the finest specimens seen in camp have been 
taken from the workings. The vein is strong and well defined, and shows 
signs of permanency . and depth. The rich values are found in a line spar. 



CHARLES OreE>E>lV 

General Drafting and Tracing — BLUE PRINTS — Fine 
Map Work a Specialty. 

2430 Charming Way Berkeley, Cal 

Telephone Berkeley 461 



ARIZONA CO^POHATIOflS 

Simplest Organization Least Restriction 

No annual or franchise tax or other cost after incorporation ; no state supervision or examina- 
tion of books; no annual statements. 

Capitalization not Limited. Private Property Exempt From Corporate Debts. 

Business may be transacted and meetings held anywhere. Charter secured same day applica- 
tion is made. Nominal sum pays all fees and charges. 
Statement of laws and organization blanks on request. 

F; W. BENNETT, Attorney-at-Law. PHOENIX, ARIZONA 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 






The shaft on the property of the Manhattan Giant baa non reached a 
depth I another fifty feel «iil !>.- added before another drifl 

is run i <irit't hu been run fifty feel on the win, 

and all in 01 d feel wide and trends 

n«>rth ;in.| SOOtli. tree gold :is big BB grains of wheat. The ore 

will ea - per ton in . 

The Manhattan Nevada *!<>i«l Hinea Company, adjoining the Manhattan 
Giant, with their fain onp, *till continue to work the largeal 

tn camp, and lead all their rivals in the way of development 
work and rapid progress in Opening up their ore bodies. 

The tunnel i* now in the hi and the faea is all In milling ore, 

another vein having just been encountered that pans well in free gold. This 

fourth vein of size that lias bean tapped in the tunnel, arid all very 

good values. There is to date 330 feet of drifting on three veins cast and 

from the tunnel, making nearly 600 feel of work done, or considerably 

than any other one property in camp, The face of the tunnel is just 

about to enter the series of rich veins that are exposed mi the surface, where 
values of hundreds of dollars in gold to the ton have Im-i-m taken out. 

In the eroSSCUt from the shaft on top of the hill a porphyry lead lias beOD 
encountered that pans very satisfactory values, and work will he pushed on 
mi to thoroughly explore that portion of the hill. 

On the El Dorado Group of the Manhattan Nevada Company a shaft is 
being sunk on a vein three feet wide, from which values of $10.17 were ob- 
tained on the surface. This shaft will be sunk perpendicularly and at depth 
a crosscut will be run to catch the lead, where high-grade values should he 
encountered. 

Just northeast of the Georgey Group, and between that mine and the prop- 
erty of the Original Manhattan Mines Company, where high-grade values are 
being taken out, P. X. Auxier announces that lie will be prepared within a 
few days to sink a shaft to a depth of 1,000 feet, and at that depth to crosscut 
in all four directions for leads that cross his property. He, as well as many 
other mining men of note, contends that this district is underlaid with por- 
phyry, tbe same as the great mining camp of Leadville, Colo., and that the 
big mines will be found at depth. This work will surely be watched with great 
interest and will be ofgreat benefit to the various mines of this district. Mr. 
Auxier is a heavy holder of Stray Dog, Jumping Jack and Indian Camp stock, 
and is amply able to carry out the work in question. 



GENERAL. 



SELLING OUT 

Our entire supply of 

Oil Well Supplies 



BELOW COST 



WRITE FOR PRICES. 

W. T. McFIE SUPPLY CO. 

Bakersfield California 



Huge Nugget. 

A huge nugget of silver ore, weighing two tons, was mined to-day at 
the Xipissing mine near Cobalt. Its estimated value is $19,000. This is the 
largest and most valuable nugget of silver ever mined, eclipsing the famous 
nugget taken from the Mollie Gibson mine at Aspen, Colo. The vein from 
which this nugget was taken is one of the most remarkable ever discovered. 
It has been stripped for 150 feet, and averages twenty-eight to sixty-four 
inches in thiekness. It is estimated that if this vein continues to only a 
depth of fifty feet below the earth's surface it will contain $4,000,000 worth 
of silver ore. Work on the Nippissing mine is being rushed, and within a few 
weeks it is expected that thousands of dollars' worth of ore per month will 
be taken out. 

Oil Fuel for Alaska Mines. 

California oil is displacing coal in Southeastern Alaska and the British 
Yukon. The time is not far distant, in the opinion of J. S. Boyle of San 
Francisco, when oil will be the only fuel used in the larger plants, such as 
mines and canneries. Boyle has just returned from Southeastern Alaska, 
where he installed an oil plant at the famous Treadwell mines on Douglas 
Island, across the channel from Juneau. He also cites the faet that some of 
the steamers, plying between this port and Southeastern Alaska are beginning 
to substitute oil for coal. 

" Treadwell 's is the first large plant in Southeastern Alaska to introduce 
oil," Boyle said, "but from present indications it will not be long before 
the last coal using plant in that district has disappeared. It is California oil 
against British coal, and the former will win. "We have laid out tankage for 
110,000 barrels at the Treadwell mines and the establishment will require. 
700 barrels a day. The Treadwell mines, which are a group of four under one 
management, have thirty-five boilers of their own and will handle a large 
quantity of the crude petroleum in the use of smaller concerns in their own 
vicinity. The White Pass and Yukon Railroad are considering the practic- 
ability and advisability of discharging the use of coal for oil. The road con- 
sumes about 15,000 tons annually. It is likely, also, that oil will be used 
in the operation of a fish oil and fertilizer manufactury being established on 
Admiralty Island, Alaska, by John Barneson and other San Franciscans. The 
Treadwell management estimates that the difference between the cost of oil 
and coal in favor of the former will pay for the new plant within five years." 



Slocks nnd Bonds TttlephoOQ WEST 6155 Codes — Western Union 

High-grnoV Securities — Private 

:md Mining Cable — "Borlini" 

Alfred A. Borlini & Co., Inc. 

Capital, $100,000 

OUR SPECIALTIES 

High-class Investments in Tonopah, Goldfield, 
Bullfrog, Manhattan, and Adjacent Districts 

We handle None But the Best 
OUR AIM 

PROFITS FOB CLIENTS 

NOW OFFERING 

Shares in the Bullfrog Fortuna Mining Company at 
25 cents per share. Property consists of two claims, the 
Big Chieftain and Pick-up, situated contiguous aud ad- 
jacent to the Montgomery Shoshone, Amethyst and Lucky 
Jack properties. In presenting this we are not offering 
a mere prospect, as the company is actively engaged in 
developing the property. Shaft and winz down 75 feet, 
tunnel in 165 feet. Have already uncovered a four-foot 
vein of high-grade ore and two smaller ones of an ex- 
ceedingly rich nature. Forty assays average $43. 

Three railroads will be running into Bullfrog within 
a fortnight. This means cheap transportation and sup- 
plies, as well as increased milling facilities and consequent 
big returns to investors. 

The Bullfrog Fortuna has all the earmarks of be- 
coming a great mine. Property, location, directorate and 
management the best. 

Write to-day for pamphlet and secure your reserva- 
tions at once. 

A. A. BORLINI & CO., Inc. 

Suite 33 Saint Mungo Building, 1300 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco 



SOUTHERN FIELDS. 



Los Angeles. 
[Special Correspondence.] 

The present improved condition of the oil business — to one class of citi- 
zens — is a thing of regret, and is looked upon with anything but cheerfulness. 
In the northwestern part of this city the residents there had hopes (and their 
hopes were developing into a reality) that within a few months the unsightly 
derricks would all have disappeared. But for these derricks and tanks and 
other structures incidental to the oil business, this would be one of the most 
sightly and attractive residence districts in the city. While they are per- 
mitted to exist, however, the district is practically ruined for residence pur- 
poses. The recent advance in oil has been the means of infusing new life 
into the business, and attempts are being made by all the operators in this 
section to increase their production, and they are doing it in a small way — 
enough in fact to make it worth while to pump the wells. 

For seventy and eighty cents per barrel is a big advance over twenty-two 
and twenty-five cents. Ninety cents is received by several companies and con- 
sumers are glad to close contracts at the latter price, knowing full well that 
more will be paid in the near future. It is said that the Kern River Indepen- 
dent Agency has been offered twenty-five cents per barrel for its million bar- 
rels of storage oil. This, of course, precludes the possibility of Kern Kiver 
oil ever again injuring the southern markets, especially under present con- 
ditions. When there is a demand for it elsewhere, as has been proven in the 
history of the oil business repeatedly. The only condition which will permit 
of manipulation is a big overproduction, and that does not exist at present. 

As far as Held operations are concerned all the fields in the southern part 
of the State are now busier than they have been for two or three years past. 
The Los Angeles, Whittier and Fullerton fields all show remarkable activity, 
and all are being extended as work proceeds. Quite a little pool is liable to 
be developed in the Coyote Hills, where the Murphy Oil Company recently 
made a substantial strike. 

The Columbia Oil Producing Company's well No. 13, at Fullerton, has at 
last been completed and is showing up for a good steady 1,000-barrel pro- 
ducer — one of the best wells by the way ever brought in in this field. The 
company intends to fully develop the entire 100 acres, which lies in the 
heart of the field, ami are beginning operations with that end in view. Se 
extra strings may be put on in the near future. 

SAN FRANCISCO STOCK & OIL EXCHANGE. 



Following are the latest quotations for stocks of oil eompanii 
the California Stock & Oil Exchange: 

Bid. Asked.l Bid. A 



Associated Oil Stk. Tr. Cer. .53 

Chicago Crude (old) 35 

Chicago Crude (new) 08 

Four SO 



.5m 



Linda Vista 

McKittrick 05 

Oil Citv Petroleum 36 

Peerless 






i6 



PACIFIC MIN.ING.& OIL .REPORTER 



Home 

Imperial:." . . . . . : . . . \ . M. . 

Independence 

Junction . ........ 

Kern i-i-I*> ■» 

Kern (new) 



.41 
16.00 



.. .08 

. .12 
.10.00 - 
. .10 



Pittsburg . . 
Sterling . . . 
Superior . . . 
Tlrirfy-three 
jv^cb&sh . . . 
West Shore . 



.05 



05 

.„..i. ..3.50 



.35 



,.1.65 



SAN FRANCISCO { STQCK EXCHANGE. 

Following are the latest quotations '-of "mining stocks listed on the San 
Francisco Stoclc :& Exchange Board: ; 

Alaska. -; 
Bid. Asked.] Bid. Asked. 

.1.50 a. 251 " -• - : 



■ _.. J - 



Wild Goose . 

■:■■■■■■'■ i be . .caitfoMav- 

Argonaut . . .4.70 

BrifiiswieK ". .'.... 777". . . . . . ."780" 

Bunker Hill 1.40 



4.75 



.65 



Central Eureka . . . 

Death -Valley . .•*".<. 
i-'orest Gifts .77 . .'. . : . 

i > -. i'. 3* w' ; 

Belrnout ... .... . . 

Belmont Extension . 7. ...... 720 

Boston Tonopah .18 

Brugher's J. B. Extension. ..: .28 

California . ,,. ■ ..., .19 

Cashbpy : . . . .*. . . z f 16 

Eureka* Tonbp'ah 

Glolden. Anchor . .58 

GoHlen:0rowo . f j -..M- 

Golden; Gate . .,..-.." ,..'.10 

Gold Mountain &-. . .07 

Gold Mountain Consolidated.. . .02 

GreatrWesterai . / Ky 

Gyp^v.-'QueiMr: GJdarsolidategij 

Indiana Tonopah 

Iowa Tonopah., :.i \ 

Jim Butler . .. . . .' 

Jim ■ Bu'tlir Extension .... 
Little .Tonopah 



.SO 



7;.34 

| Neyaiia. 
Tonopah District. 



Furnace Creek Co.. . . . ._. 3.90 4.75 

Furnace Creek Extension 1.12 

Greenwater Black Jack 60 

Lightner Mining Co 1.25 

South Eureka Mining Co ... . 



.62 

.is 



...6.62 6.75 



,.20 

.21 
.17 

..07' 
.60 



Midway 2.75 2.85 

Midway Extension 40 .45 

Mizpah Extension 38 .40 

Montana 3.95 4.00 

Montana Midway Extension.. .25 .26 

Montana Pittsburg Extension .13 .14 

New Tork Tonopah Consol. . .28 .32 

North Star .50 .52 

Ohio Tonopah .-.27 .28 

Ohio Tonopah Extension 14 

Paymaster .7.7. .03 .04 

Bed Rock Extension .04 .06 

Rescue 29 .30 

-Tonopah Extension '. . .' . r. 7.50 

Tonopah Home Consolidated, . .02 .04 

Tonopah Lode' . . . 7 15 

Tonopah Silver and Gold 04 

Tonopah of Nevada 21.50 

West End 2.35 2.37 

MaeNamara;. . ".77— "773fWest Tonopah .40 

Goldfield District. 



-.06- 



.U9t 

l.sP 



.08 
.03 
.07 

7.65 



.OS 



Adams ,,20 ., .22 

Aloha . ...:.., .:..... .-'.11 ' .13 

Atlanta 94 .95 

Band . ...- .....: ,35 .50 

Berkeley : . . r. . .22 

Black Ants ....... 15 . .16 

B. B. TBenailia' .'■'. . . . .... : . . . .13 .14 

Black Butte Extension 16 .1 

Black Bock . . .v. ..,'..'.„... r .13. ..14 

Blue Bell '.....". 25 ' .26 

Blue Bull 46 .47 

Brooklyn 06 .07 

Butte 'Goldfield . . . m : v .16 .17 

Booth!. :-CJ ..'.:.-. VV1.30. J',35 

C. O.T5'.'. ' 1.40 

Colorado 10 



Great Bend Annex 

Great Bend Extension 29 

Hibernia 23 

Highland 10 

Jumbo 4.25 

Jumbo Extension 1.65 

Juno 10 

Kendall 82 

Kendall Extension 

uaguna 1.87 

Lone Star 42 

Lucky Boys 16 

Mayne '. . . .23 

May Queen 40 

May Queen Extension 14 

McMahon . 10 

46 



1.15 



Columbia T.10 Milltown Mining Co 

Columbia Mountain . . 
Combination Fraction . 

Commonwealth 

Conauerer ..-..-. ...-.■, ,-,- 
Cracker Jack 



; 1.10 
6.25 
. .35 
.-.30- 
.32 



Daisy 2.90 

Diamondfield-B. B. Con 64 

Dixie 19 

Empire'7 .". . , ,'T- . . .-;....• .13 

Esmeralda .' ...,...'..".;....- .23 

Exploitation : .25 

Federal , . 7 7. ..'. ... ::,jj, .#.* ...7. .., / 

1 awn 30 

Florence 4.00 

Frances-Mohawk .90 

Frisco 13 

Gold Bar Goldfield I.W 

Gold Dust 08 

Goldfield Belmont . . . „ 1.05 

Goldfield M-. of N'ei&la': .... .1.80' 

Goldneid'North Star 33 

Goldfield. Portland 33 

Goldfield Kewanas 76 

Goldfield Band 03 



34 
.33 
3.00 
.66 
.20 
.14 



' .12 



.95 

.20 

1:75 



l.,85 
.34 
.36 

• 77. 



Great Bend . 

gfl!T3»8l 

Amargosa Gold Mine 

Amethyst . -. ' .8-0' 

Big Bullfrog 09 

Black Spar 29""- 

Bonanza Mountain Gold 

Bonnie Clare v . . .34- 

Bullfrog Annex . .V.77'7. ... . i05* 

Bullfrog v Bann.ej\ . 44 

.bullfrog iwhibinatioh \id-' 

Bullfrog Consolidated-. .... . .05 

Bullfrog Daisy >: . ...:.. .50 



Mohawk : 17.42 

Mohawk Extension 30 

Nevada Boy 31 

Nevada Goldfield 41 

Oro .• 43 

Palace Goldfield 11 

Pennsylvania 04 

Potlatch 45 

Bed Hills 49 

Bed Lion 13 

Bed Top 4.20 

-Red Top Extension 27 

Sandstorm 85 

Sandstorm Extension 13 

Sherman 17 

Silver Pick ... 

Simmerone 

Spearhead Gold 40 

Spearhead Fraction 

St. Ives' ' 98 

Sun Dog 04 

Sunnyside 

Treasure 28 

"Vernal 27 

Wqnder .;. . . .-. 07 

10? PT3.XO".. 



.1.35. 1.40 
' Bullfrog 'District. 
..OS. Ti.lOlHappy .Hooligan 17 



Bullfrog Extension 



-.81 
.10 

.25 

.35 

■m 

.45 
.20 
-.07 
.53 



.117' .13 



Hoinestake Consolidated 1.60 

Lige Harris 08 

■&i*i*B^ Bullfrog 04 

Mayflower Extension 

Maryland „ , : < 05 

'Midnight . : . .'..'. 20 

Montana Bullfrog ..... ..16 

Montana: Hill Mines .'. .16 

Montgomery Mountain . .-.\.-: .58 
Montana-Shoshone Extension.. .23 
New Orleans .-,... . T i ." 05 



.33 
.30 

.25 

4.30 
1.70 

.84 

.10 

1.90 

.44 

.24 
.41 
.15 

.50 
17.50 
.31 
.33 
.43 
.45 

.05 
.50 
.50 
.15 
.4.25 
.29 
.88 
.15 

1.60 
.45 

.24 
1.00 
.05 
.12 
.30 
.29 
.08 

.18 
1.65 
.09 
.05 
.12 



.17 
.20 



.24 



K|0i 




olbaaB. goiiliu 


to 


PI 

ne 


Oil Co. 


■■■-T 


Gc 


*0 ,^so~i 


isrk 


t.^ 


.:;;■:::::/: E ; r,7i 



Lubricating Oils and Greases 

Marine Engine Oils, B.oi|Ter Compound, Distillates 



■'•:■:. ■ 



Linseed Oil, Pataiiiae^Wax,: Vegetable 0.il 

A>:/-et L'.Bii. .jaun.T0X," JT.0 .'uiaM3ixS lieaS ia»noCf 

Aspnaltujcn, Annual Qd, rish Oil3ot»!I»a bm-amia 



22 Clay Street 



San Francisco, Cal. 






SEATTLE BRANCH: 
Cor. Pike. f St, and R. R. Ave. 

REFINERY: West Berkeley, Cal. 



Wm. Wallace 



B. W. Charlesworth 



WALLACE <fc CBARLESWORTU 




PLUMBERS, TINNERS and 

Galvanized Tank Builders 

Everything in Plumbing, Tin and 
Sheet Iron Work 

Estimate furjiished on all kinds 

of work 

Oil Tanks, Bath Tubs, Sinks, 

Wagon Tanks, Toilets, Pumps, 

Water Barrels, Lavatories, 

Wind Mills 



P&B 

Coalinga, Cal. 



Agent of 
ROOFING PAINTS 



CRESCENT BLUE PRINT CO. 

=MINING MAPS= 



BLUE PRINTS TRACING 

612 O'Farrell St. Tel: Franklin 773 San Francisco 



WRITING IN SIGHT 




Just Purchased New 

L. C. SMITH & BROS. 

: 7 OTEWRITER1 ■: 

Natha^Dohrman Co. .6 macbjjies;; c.JJnion Trust Bank 7 . 5 *;o^bines 

Cal. Safe -Deposit Bank .5- ' r-'hsn-nS: Cal. Wine Ass'n 6 .aoV'h:- 

Also City and Coimty-'BMjk, & Nevada Bank . ■»«• 

Catalqgu* Free ,-.,.-, ,- 

L. & I. ALEXANDER & CO. 

Telephone.JlCest 6288 
Branches— Los Attgtj^t. fcjrtlgwfl, -.Seattle, Spokane, 

,,,,.. i ., Tacoma.,. . ., ,. ,. 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



Bullfrog Bundle . 

Hullfrog If llntflt . 

)ld Kind- 




er 

ulJTro,rtt i .,: X 

Bullfrun National Bank 71 

Bullfr Star 11 

Bullfrog fjnixt .29 

Bullfr 43 

..la 09 



Denver Bullfrog 2.50 

Denver Bullfrut; Aunox 35 

D.iivir Ball Intension 07 

Diamond Bullfrog 55 

Eellpee 1.45 

Hold Bar 1.70 

Gold Bar Annex 15 

Sold Bar Extension 16 

(iold Dollar 07 

(JoUlen Sceptre 63 

bold Mountain Goldfield 11 



.12 
.21 
.48 
.11 
.40 

.38 
.10 



1.75 



.10 
.64 
.15 



Nevada Bullfrog Midas 48 

i 19 

North Shoshone . .16 

Ohio Bullfrog 

Original Bullfrog 24 



Bhyolite Towneite 07 

San Francisco 1" 

one 

Shoshone-Bullfrog Gold 09 

Shoshone National Bank 11 

Skookum Bullfrog 24 

Starlight Bullfrog 95 

Steinway .41) 

Tramp Consolidated 2.35 

Tramp M. Co 1.00 

Trinidad 56 

Vallev View 33 

Velvet 14 

v. ntura 11 

Wolverine 01 

Vankee Girl 21 



Manhattan District. 



April Fool Extension 06 .07 

Atlantic and Pacific 07 .08 

Bull Dog 20 

Comet 04 .06 

Gold Wedge 17 19 

Granny G. M 34 .35 

Hindocraft 10 

Indian Camp 85 

.Tumping Jack 51 .52 

Little Grey 50 

Manhattan Broncho 14 .15 

Manhattan Belmont 07 .08 

Manhattan Belle 09 

Manhattan Broncho 14 .15 

Manhattan Buffalo 09 .12 

Manhattan Carson 13 

Manhattan Central 10 

Manhattan Consolidated. ...1.05 1.10 

Manhattan Consolidated Ex 23 

Manhattan Combination 15 .16 

Manhattan Crescent 14 '.15 

Manhattan Cowboy 12 .13 

Other 
17 



Manhattan Diamond 15 

Manhattan Dexter 63 

Manhattan Humboldt 

Manhattan Little Joe 06 

Manhattan Jumbo 06 

Manhattan «£. Co. Nevada... .17 
Manhattan Mondy Extension . . 

Manhattan Oro Fino 

Manhattan Bed Top 08 

Mineral Hill 

Mustang Annex 10 

Mustang Manhattan .19 

Mustang Extension 15 

Original Manhattan 20 

Pine Nut 24 

Rocky Hill 

Seyler Humphry 13 

Stray Dog . . . .' 67 

Thanksgiving 05 

Whale 12 

Yellow Horse 11 



.53 

.2.1 
.25 
.21 
.09 

.09 
.10 

.12 
.27 

.'.is 
.42 
UO 



.35 

.15 
.13 

.04 



.65 
.10 

.07 
.09 
.19 

.10 
.08 

.06 



.23 
.25 
-.20 
.14 



Belmont Johnnie 

Bullfrog Johnnie 25 

Centennial Goldfield 

Congress 

Cyrus Noble 

Diamondfield Triumph 55 

Eagle 's Nest 54 

Excelsior Mountain Copper.. 1.00 

Esperanza 03 

Fairview Silver King 55 

Fairview Eagle 1.30 

Fairview R. Eoek 35 

Flor Leasing 45 

Giant Hattie . .55 

Globe Johnnie .50 

Gold Reed Extension 15 

Gold Reed Mining Co 10 

Golden Terra 

Goldyke Reef 

Gold Quartz 13 

Greenwater P. Copper 

Ida Mines 30 

Interstate : . . .10 

Johnnie Consolidated 

Kawich & B 



.65 
.15 
.18 
.56 
.55 

.05 
.65 

1.50 

.50 



.10 
.18 



.08 



Alpha . 
Alta . . 
Andes . 
Belcher 



.20 
... .02 

Comstocks. 
Bid. Asked 
. .14 .16 
. .07 .10 
...27 .29 
. .40 .43 



Districts. 

Kawich Keystone 01 .02 

Kawich M. Co. X 02 

Lida Bell . . .06 

Lynx Creek 1.40 

Midway Johnnie 08 

Nevada Hills 3.35 

Nevada Hills Extension 

N. H. Florence . 22 

Nevada Sunshine 60 

Nevada Tule Gold 

North Star Wonder 33 

Palmetto 11 

fata L. Strike . 

Phila Johnnie 

Pittsburg' Silver Peak 2.10 

Pyramid 78 

Ramsey 

Red Boy 35 

Rocco Homstake 

Round Mountain 97 

Round Mountain Alpine 13 

Round Mountain Extension.. .10 

Ruby Wonder .34 

Sierra M. & M 12 

Sylvania 



Best and Belcher 1.70 

Bullion 30 .35 

Caledonia 52 ,55 

Challenge 25 .26 

Ohollar r . ,. 22 .24 Savage . 

Confidence. JfJL-.i -1.30 1:40 Scorpion 

Con. Imperial V«... 03 ,04)Seg. Bel. 



Impe 

Con. Va. M. Co 1.55 

Crown Point '. 30 

Eureka Con 8.75 

Exchequer . . ..:,.,,. 

Gould and Curry 41 

Hale and Norcross 1.10 

Kentuck ,'';.'. 

— 



1.60 
.32 



.43 
1.20 



Julia 12 

■Justice 07 

Lady Washington 07 

Mexican 1.25 

Occidental 76 

Ophir 3.20 

Overman 18 

Potosi 23 

1.35 



Belcher . 
Sierra Nevada 
SilVer Hill . . 
Standard Con. 
.65 St. Louis .... 
Union Con. . . 

Utah 

.19 Yellow Jacket 
- . ■ . -' v 



.11 

L25 

71 

...... s.oo 

06 

93 

12 

.1. ..1.36 



MOVEMENT OF OIL VESSELS. 



PRIVATE ROOriS 



JULES W1TTMAN 



.14 
.12 



.50 
.24 
.65 
.36 
.35 

,io 

2.20 
2.15 

.26 

.10 
1.00 
.14 
.33 
.36 

.06 



Bid. Asked. 



.16 
.08 



1.30 



3.25 
.19 
.24 

140 

.11) .u 



Jules' Restaurant 

Only First-Class Restaurant in Burned District 
Formerly 315-3123 Pine Street 

Regular Dinner, with Wine, 75 cts. 
Sundays and Holidays, $1 00 

OPEN EVENINGS 

326 BUSH STREET, Bet. Montgomery and Kearny. San Francisco 



GAS OR STEAM POWER 

Either available at your well when your pumping engine 
is equipped with a 



.12 

1.30 
.74 



.94 
.13 

1.4(1 




D. C. & U. 

Convertible 
Cylinder 

Manufactured by 



Used in every Oil Field 
in United Stales. 

Simple, reliable and easy to start. Can be changed from 
gas to steam and vice versa in Jive minutes. 
Can be attached at the well to any drilling engine. . 
Write for prices and particulars to 

E. R. UHLIN, San Pedro, Cal. 

SOLE AGENT 
PACIFIC COAST 

Cable Address " ROMANIC LONDON " 

LANE & MACANDREW 

26 Great St. Helens, 
London, England 

Oil Merchants and Brokers 



Brokers for Building, Purchasing, Selling and Chartering 

OIL TANK STEAMERS 



1 



Gasa Oil fo* Japan. 
The ship Astral was cleared November 13th for Yoltkaichi, Japan, with 
133,205 cases of refined petroleum, valued at $98,574. 



Managers of the Following Tank Steamers: 

'LE COQ," "ORIFLAMME." "tUCILINE," "LUX." "TEREK," 

"BALAKANI," "CAUCASIAN," " EUPLECTELA," 

" ROCKL1GHT," " TURBO," " PINNA." 



i8 



PACIFIC MINING & OILrREPORTER 



Shipments of Crude Oil. 

The tank steamer Eoseerans and the tank schooner Monterey were cleared 
for Honolulu November 13th. The Eoseerans takes 23,000 barrels of crude 
oil in bulk, valued at $13,800, and the Monterey 19,400 barrels valued at $11,640. 
Both cargoes were laden at Monterey. 

Will Take Oil to the Orient. 

The British tank steamers Ashtabula and Tuscarora will return to the 
Orient with refined petroleum, within a few days, both vessels having been 
chartered for that purpose. 

Crude Oil for Hawaii. 

The tank steamer Lansing was cleared for -Kahului with 40,000 barrels 
of crude oil in bulk, valued at $24,000. 

Refined Oil for Japan. 

The British tank steamer "Winnebago, chartered by the Standard Oil Com- 
pany, cleared San Francisco November 17th for Itosaki, Japan, with 1,800,000 
gallons of refined petroleum valued at $70,200. 

EUROPEAN MARKET REPORT. 

(Compiled expressly for Pacific Mining & Oil Reporter.) 



Russian Position. 

During the last three weeks the quotations on the Baku market have 
fallen considerably. Crude petroleum has fallen 5 copecks per pood, and is 
now quoted at 24% copecks per pood for prompt delivery. There are no 
sellers at the present time for, forward delivery, although it seems probable 
that the price will be still further reduced in the near future. The stocks on 
the fields, however, are not very large. 

The price for residuals has also • fallen, and now stands at 27% copecks 
per pood for prompt delivery, or a drop of 4 copecks per pood during the three 
weeks. The price for delivery during the navigation of the Volga is 27% 
copecks per pood. 

Kerosene has. been in "good demand, and although the price fell 4% 
copecks per pood it has now slightly recovered, and for prompt delivery free 
on rail Baku is quoted at 29% copecks per pood. 

There are still no sellers for forward delivery, but as the stocks of kerosene 
are so small this is not surprising. For delivery to the interior by the Volga 
kerosene is quoted at 29 copecks per pood f. o. b. vessel on the Caspian Sea. 

The production during the month of September of the Baku fields shows 
a considerable increase, having reached the figure of 39,304,000 poods, which 
is very satisfactory; and provided no further disturbances are created by 
the workmen the production should at least be maintained at this figure and 
probably increased. 

There have been no further disturbances at Baku, and, although there is 
still some unrest amongst the workmen, still the position is now satisfactory 
and the work is progressing regularly. 

Indian Market Report. 

During the past three weeks there has been a considerable advance in 
the price of lamp oils in the Indian markets. In the Karachi market Burmah 
oil advanced 3 annas and Borneo oil 1 anna per case; whilst in the Calcutta 
market Russian case oil has advanced 4 annas; "6 pies and Burmah oil, Borneo, 
Sumatra and American bulk oil 2 annas. The prices in the Bombay market 
have remained unchanged. 

The volume of business has been rather less, but the demand is still good 
and the market firm. The quotations were as follows: 

Bombay — ■ Rupees. 

American ease oil 4. 8. 0. 

Russian case oil 4. 4. 0. 

' ' Elephant ' ' oil in tins 3. 10. 0. 

Sumatra "Rising Sun" in tins. 3. 10. 0. 

Borneo oil in bulk 2. 8. 6. 

Burmah oil in bulk . .....,.:.., , 2. 4. 6. 

Karachi-^ ■ 

American case oil 3. 14. 0. 

Burmah oil in tins 2. 15. 0. 

Borneo oil in tins 2. 13. 0. 

Sumatra oil in bulk 2. 13. 0. 

American oil in bulk 2. 13. 0. 

Calcutta — 

American case oil . . . , 1 4. 6. "6. 

Eussian case oil 4. 4. 6. 

Burmah oil in bulk 2. ,11. 6. 

Borneo oil in bulk 2. 12. 0. 

Sumatra oil in bulk 3, 2. 0. 

American oil in bulk 3. 2. 0. 

English Market Report. 

The markets in London and Liverpool for American and Eussian lamp 
oil have remained practically unchanged during the last two or three weeks, 
the only change being in the price of Eussian lamp oil in London, where there 
was a fall of % d. to 3-16 d. per gallon. "With this exception there was no 
change. The market is steady, and the volume of business is improving. The 
quotations were as follows: 

London — 
Eussian oil, 5%d. ex wharf in barrels. 
American oil, 6%d.@6%d. ex wharf in barrels. 



Liverpool — - 
Russian oil, 5%d.@6d. ex wharf in barrels. 
American oil, 6d.@6%d. ex wharf in barrels. 




beL 



. «5ftJ 



Steel Oil Tanks 

Refineries Erected Complete 
If you want 

Promplii&sg * 
Economy 
Durability 

and 

Honest 
Workmanship 

WRITE US 



Established 1872 



Oil Tank erected for O. R. & N. in Oregon 



Win. Graver Tank Works 

East Chicago, Ind. 



Contract 

Drilling deep 
wells for 
Oil or 
Water 
Furnish Com- 
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for Drilling 
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Oil Well Tools 

Oil Well Cas- 
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SAN LUIS 
Box 237 W. E. YOULE OBISPO, CAL. 

FRESNO COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY 

Incorporated under the laws of California, January 21, 1901 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 

FULLY PAID UI» 

SEARCHERS OF RECORDS AND 
CONVEYANCE 



Abstracts of Title carefully compiled at reasonable rates 



N:o. lllf> K St. I^resxio, Cal. 



A. P. fDAY 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

[WHOLESALE AND RETAIL] 

fllost Reliable and Complete Stock of eamp 

supplies and oil men's furnishings 

in Coalinga 

COALINCA. CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



Vol. VIII. No. 3 



San Francisco, Cal., December 5, 1906 



Price, 10 Cents 



CALIFORNIA MINERS' ASSOCIATION CONVENES. 



The California Miners' Association convened in Hamilton hall, San Fran- 
on December 3rd, and is now in session. This is the fifteenth annual con- 
on of the body. Delegates from all parts of the state were present and 
enthusiasm has been constantly manifested. Addresses have been deliv- 
ered by ;i number of prominent men. While there are fewer members than 
usual present the same unison of feeling and the same magnificent spirit was 
shown. There is the same determination to develop the State's mineral re- 
soorees without infringement upon any of the other industries. This has been 
the aim of the California Miners' Association and the members feel that 
material progress lias been made. 

The meeting was called to order by President Alfonso A. Tregidgo. 
Charles 11. Dunton, vice-president of the Association was called upon for 
a few remarks. Responding he said in part: 

••I am greatly disappointed in the number here. I had hoped for a better 
showing than ever, and surely I had every reason to expect it. MiniDg in 
California is of greater importance today, despite the growth of other indust- 
ries, than it ever was before. Things have come to a crisis. In my mind we 
ought to do something or quit. The farmers and the people of all other lines 
of business are organized, and there never was a time when it was so necessary 
for the miners to be organized as now. It seems to me that, the principal 
thing we are in need of is money. Financially, I am ashamed of the miners 
lit California. If there is any class of men in the world who ought to have 
money, it is the mining men. but we have not enough to even attend to the 
ordinary routine of the organization. It is urgent that we should make our 
proper position felt in this State, and I want to say, as in the beginning, that 
we must either do something or quit." 

President Tregidgo spoke upon the year's work of the executive committee 
and of the prospects for success in the work of the association. He presented 
a resume of its labors of the last twelve months, including extensive corre- 
spondence with President Roosevelt, Charles D. Walcott, director of the United 
States Geological Survey, C. E. Grunsky, Senator Perkins and Rufus P. Jen- 
nings. 

"We were expecting the Gillett bill to pass," he said, "when occurred the 
awful disaster which befell our great metropolis, that necessitated millions 
being appropriated for the relief of our sufferers and completely overshadowed 
all other demands for industrial benefit. 

"In that great conflagration the California Miners' Association lost con- 
siderable, but the name and spirit remained imperishable. 

"Prom what data remained in the hands of the president, who fortunately 
had a copy of last year's proceedings, and in the hands of individual contribu- 
tors, we have managed to publish the California Miners' Association Annual 
.for 1905. And it may be said, for the spirit of the organization, that we are 
here today, met in convention, with a firm determination of adding to our 
membership and strength, and continuing the glorious work, for which we 
originally came together, namely, to extract the untold millions of gold that 
is known to exist in the mountains, with benefit to the farmer of California 
and not to his detriment." 

W. F. Englebright of Nevada county, who was recently elected by a 
large majority to succeed Congressman Gillett, and to follow up with a term 
of his own, was at the convention. He had just been to Eureka making an 
examination of the harbor with a view to introducing a bill for a further 
appropriation for its proper improvement. He will not introduce the bill at 
this session, however, and will make another and more thorough investigation 
of the needs of the harbor before the next session of Congress. He was called 
upon to address the meeting, and said in part: 

"I come from the mining country, I am personally interested in mines, 
and I maintain the greatest interest in the affairs of California's mines. And 
I believe that it is just as necessary to continue the work of this association 
as it was to start it fourteen years ago. The hydraulic mines have been shut 
down for a time, it is true, but the mining industry is advancing just the 
same. It is still in its infancy. California has been a great gold producer, 
but there are still many square miles of undeveloped mining land, rich in 
mineral wealth. 

"I want to state to this convention, as a member of Congress from a 
mining country, that any action it may take will receive my most careful at- 



tention.. It shall bo my endeavor to promote the mining industry not only 
of California, but. of the entire United States." 

The second day's session was full of interest and many exhaustive papers 

were read b.v delegates from various COUllties. The trend of the discourses 

were in favor of abolishing or at least modifying the anti debris law which 
has caused the output of gold to fall off appalingly. Thousands of hydraulic 
mines throughout the state have been shut down for years that could be 
worked lo great prolit by their owners, but. for the law which daily injures 

""' ' '"« industry, protecting the farmer from an imaginary rather than a 

real evil. The debris commission has already proved that with proper safe- 
guards hydraulicing might continue with no more injury to the forming 
lands than now results from the natural erosion. The greatest effort will bo 
made by the Association to have the nefarious law repealed, or at least mod- 
ified in a material degree. 

Frank H. Short spoke extemporaneously on the oil subject. His address 
however, was forceful and eloquent, and he was loudly applauded at many 
points during his address. In part he said: 

"The oil man is not the aristocrat of the. mining profession. His work 
is, like his product, crude and homely, not like the pure gold or silver. He 
is admitted as a sort of interloper among the men of the mining profession, 
but he is none the less useful, if not so beautiful. 

"I have been in most parts of the country, but I have always liked Cal- 
ifornia far better than- any other State because she accepts wide-awake en- 
terprise more intelligently than any other. Until about ten years ago she was 
hopelessly impeded from competing in the field of manufacture by the lack 
of the essential element. Then came the discovery of oil, furnishing a relief 
by supplying a cheap and good fuel. I think we would be a good many laps 
behind our present position had it not been for the discovery of oil. 

"I never took greater satisfaction in my life in any professional duty than 
I did in answering Senator Thurston when he took it upon himself to defend 
the scrippers. He accused the miners of getting something for nothing. If 
there is anybody in the world who should be the last man to face the charge 
of getting something for nothing, it is the miner. Nobody makes money save 
by speculation, but no speculator risks as much or endures such hardships as 
the miner in his quest for what nature has concealed. Some have grown ra- 
pidly wealthy out of mines; but in the vast majority is the miner who never 
found gold, but who has found the spring of eternal hope. Although he has 
grown gray in the elusive quest, he still works on, and still hopes on, though 
perhaps- too old or too feeble to enjoy wealth if it should become his. And 
whenever I see his lonely cabin on the hillside, or hear his patient pick in the 
precipitous canyon, I feel that the miner is the bravest man of all — the one 
who has dared to risk all. And whatever rich reward he may obtain, he has 
full merited. The miner is a far greater benefactor to society than he is to 
himself. Whatever he produces is of benefit to the rest of the world. 

"A few years ago the oil miners were a discredited lot, toiling patiently 
to find that which everybody else knew was not there. Everybody was poking 
fun at them until they made their great discovery, which may be of greater 
value to the people of the State in the long run than the gold discovery. Yet 
they were nearly all poor men. To show the rapid growth of this industry, 
some ten years ago there was no oil in the State, whereas now, in some oil 
producing states, it has become necessary to suspend operations, until there 
shall be such a price as will warrant the production and shipment of the oil. 
"In the oil business, as in others, the railroads stand in the way of the 
people. Every r cent of freight lies between the producer and the consumer. 
In this emergency the pipe-line companies have come to the rescue of the 
buyers, and are able to deliver the oil at tangible prices. And I may state 
as a fact, though one not likely of accomplishment, that if the railroads car- 
ried all of the oil for nothing, they would still be making more than before 
the discovery. With the use of coal, it cost the Southern Pacific $150 to move 
a train from Bakersfield to San Francisco, whereas with oil it can be done for 
$45. That is from the statistics of the railroad company and shows the I 
endous advantage to the transit companies alone. 

"All of the miners of California ought to stand together. I am sure 
nobody will suffer from their so doing. I never knew them to ask what was 
unfair to the other fellow. All they want is fair play, and I am firm in the 
belief that the gold miners will be just as much behind fair legislation to 
help the oil miners as they would be if it were for the benefit of their own 
particular metal. 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



"I believe that there is no miner who is not glad to meet in the old 
miners' city of San Francisco. They are all anxious to help rebuild the city, 
and their help . is necessary. San Francisco was the only one of the great 
cities of the world which was made great through mining. Its reconstruction 
and rebuilding is not a personal work, but every man who remembers the 
traditions of his race, out of sheer respect for his ancestors, should do with 
a will all that is within his power. 

"I believe there will be political, commercial, and perhaps racial struggles 
greater than any on the shores of the Mediterranean before it is accomplished, 
but we have a patriotic as well as a personal interest to guard, and it is our 
duty to place San Francisco again in her place as the Queen of the Pacific. 

"No man who would stand in the way of the welfare of the city at this 
time, or who would allow anything so petty as a personal interest to stand 
between him and the best interests of God's own poor and his own city, is 
entitled to the honor of belonging to the race." 



OIL EXPORTS GROWING RAPIDLY. 



One of the most important factors in the commerce of the Pacific ports is 
the increasing exportation of mineral oil therefrom, which, although the oil 
industry of California is practically in its infancy, already requires a large 
fleet of vessels. 

The Standard Oil Company, which has been engaged for some time in 
shipping refined oil to the Orient, has, within the past year withdrawn several 
large tank steamers from the Black Sea trade and placed them on the run be- 
tween San Francisco and Japan and China. The Associated Oil Company, 
which formerly had four oil carrying vessels in its Pacific service, has recently 
been compelled to order more oil carrying vessels, one of which, the W. S. 
Porter, is nearing completion at the Newport News ship-building yard. 

The Union Company is another concern that operates a large fleet of 
vessels in its coast and island trade. A year ago seven vessels would serve 
to take care of this company's trade, but recently three additional tank steam- 
ers, with a total capacity of nearly seven million gallons, have been purchased, 
two of which, the Lansing and Santa Maria, have already reached the Pacific 
Coast and have been placed in service. The other which will be known as the 
Santa Rita, has been completed and will soon reach this port. 

In fact, that oil shipping business has grown to such enormity that it is 
probable that constant additions will be required to the several fleets to pro- 
vide for the growth of the industry. The Union Oil Company has just com- 
pleted its Panama pipe line, through which large quantities of oil will be 
shipped from California for the Atlantic ports of the United States, and for 
Europe, engaging a large Atlantic fleet in addition to that which has already 
been provided for the Pacific. The recent contracts with Japan and Chile 
also add greatly to the extent of the industry and it seems quite probable that 
by a year hence the present fleet of oil carrying vessels will have been more 
than doubled. 

The Graciosa Oil Company has recently purchased a large tank steamer 
for its Pacific trade from the J. M. MeDuffer Oil Company of New York and 
it is stated on good authority that other vessels are being constructed for 
this progressive company and its subsidies. 

Formerly the oil carrying vessels in returning from the Orient came in 
ballast, but recent experiments have shown that a return cargo of merchandise 
can be successively carried, so that now all of the tank steamers in the 
Oriental trade bring on their return voyage from 4,000 to 5,000 tons of Oriental 
merchandise. It is probably unnecessary to state that each of these vessels 
generates its motive power from oil fuel furnished by each individual company, 
which results in the very minimum cos't of transportation throughout the going 
-and return voyage. 

Pipe lines are being rapidly constructed to provide for the full output 
and capacity of the various oil fields of the State. There are already hundreds 
•of miles of these lines forming a network of iron in some portions of California. 

Below we give an up-to-date list of the oil carrying vessels of each of 
the companies which, however, are increasing in number at such a rapid rate 
that it is. almost impossible to keep an accurate account of them. 

Associated. 

Capacity in 
Name of Vessel — Class. gallons. 

Rosecrane Tank steamer 966,000 

Marian Chilcatt Ship 672,000 

Monterey Schooner 840,000 

Santiago Schooner 462,000 

W. S. Porter Tank steamer 2,600,000 

Union. 

Lansing Tank steamer 1,947,000 

Washtenaw Tank steamer 1,239,000 

Roma Tank steamer 1,155,000 

Argyll . Tank steamer 1,125,000 

Santa Rita Tank steamer 2,205,000 

Santa Maria Tank steamer 2,205,000 

Whittier Tank steamer 474,000 

Pullerton Ship 672,000 

Santa Paula Ship 344 400 

Standard. 
Dakotah Tank steamer 1,700,000 



Winnebago .Tank steamer - 2,000,000 

Appalachee Tank steamer 1,375,000 

Housatonie . Tank steamer 1,725,000 

Tuscarora Tank steamer 2,500,000 

Tonowanda '. . . . . .Tank steamer 1,300,000 

Seminole Tank steamer 2,180,000 

Ashtabula Tank steamer 2,600,000 

Calcutta Bark 858,000 

Brilliant t Bark Not known 

Atlas Bark 850,000 

Asuncion Bark 950,000 

George Loomis Bark 277,000 

Barge No. 3 Tank barge 1,400,000 

Bernecia Tank barge Not known 

Maverick Tank steamer Not known 

King George Tank steamer Not known 

Graciosa. 

Catania Tank steamer 1,000,000 

Besides the above there are dozens of vessels plying from the Pacific ports 
that are engaged wholly, or in part, in the carrying of case oil in varying 
amounts. In fact, the exportation of mineral oils is growing to such a magni- 
tude that it seems quite within the bonds of possibility that San Francisco 
will eventually become the greatest oil shipping port in this country. 



CLAIM FOR GOVERNMENT HARBOR IMPROVEMENT AT 
PORT HARFORD 



Abstract of an Address Delivered by L. E. Bloclrman, Secretary of the Santa 

Maria Chamber of Commerce, before a Delegation Representing 

the Various Commercial Bodies of California. 



The gist of my discussion was as follows: 

Several years ago, before oil petroleum was discovered in the Santa Maria 
Valley, and the business, of Port Harford was less than one-fourth of its 
present volume, a breakwater was started by the government for the protection 
of this fine deep harbor, but for some unknown reason, unless it be that the 
strenuously made claims of San Pedro overshadowed every other harbor con- 
sideration, the work was dropped after reaching out a short distance only. 

Port Harford, or rather what is known as the northern part of San Luis 
Bay, is one of the few deep harbors south of San Francisco, which, in ordinary 
weather, is a safe one, but that in strong weather needs the protection of a 
breakwater — a breakwater already begun but discontinued. 

Recently the increased oil business has called for the extension of the 
present long wharf, so that very deep vessels can now land at this port. The 
County of San Luis, on the Union Oil Company's shore line at Ovila, is about 
to construct another wharf to accommodate the increased agricultural, as well 
as the oil interests, of the tributary territory. The California Petroleum Re- 
fineries, Limited, two miles east, is erecting an enormous oil refining plant, 
with a town site known as ' ' Oil Port, ' ' besides a long wharf for shipping pur- 
poses, nearly completed. The Standard Oil Company and the Union Oil Com- 
pany have each a pipe line from the Santa Maria oil fields to the Port where 
barges and steamers are continually loading oil. At Oil Port still another pipe 
line is under construction to the oil fields which will have a carrying capacity 
of upwards of 20,000 barrels daily. Such is the increasing productive outlook 
of the Port and tributary fields. The Union Oil Company at present is pumping 
about 10,000 barrels of oil daily through its own pipe line, and this is not all 
the oil it produces. It is estimated that the Santa Maria field is now piping to 
Port Harford close to 7,000,000 barrels of oil yearly, about one-fourth of the 
production of the whole state. And the field is practically in its infancy. 

Around Arroyo Grande and' Edna in San Luis Obispo County, another oil 
field is soon to come in. The results from the first test wells are the proof of 
this. This is all tributary territory to Port Harford and accentuates the needs 
of proper shipping facilities at the harbor. Railroads, except for local deliver- 
ies, have no facilities for shipping oil. Their freight traffic is already more 
than they can handle. Oil is exceedingly high in Los Angeles and very low 
yet in the Kern field. Why? Because the railroad traffic is too congested, 
aside from any considerations of being adversely manipulated. The Kern 
Valley producers are looking wistfully forward to the time they can be con- 
nected by a pipe line with Port Harford to market their stored and yet in- 
pumped oils. 

The importance of a steady and regular supply of oil to our large cities is 
getting to be a vital point in their growth. In 1890 Los Angeles, with no oil 
fuel, was nothing but a passable tourist town, the price of coal fuel being 
prohibitive. Today it counts upwards of 1,500 manufacturing plants, repre- 
senting nearly $40,000,000 capital, the very existence of which depends on oil — 
oil that can be conveyed cheaply to its own port. The oil fields around the 
city of Los Angeles are inadequate to the demand. To our Port it looks for its 
additional supply, as well as do many other coast cities. 

With the presentation of these facts, every one of which can be substanti- 
ated, it is to the interest of the producers of oil and to the still greater con- 
sumers ' that the importance of Port Harford be given recognition, and that its 
safer shipping facilities be recognized by California 's Congressional represen- 
tatives. 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



THE SANTA MARIA FIELD. 

n1 paid the oil wells of Santa Maria a 
-<\ ami noted some few changes and several points of development 
illy relative to tl isive work of the field. 

The first p] - the Pinal Oil Company which baa caughl on 

to the general spirit of progress. It baa been rehabilitating its built 

; 'I making things mora commodious generally for the men. 
were pumping, Nos. 2 and <». probably the besl of its deep 
Affable Mr. Burns was not there to give any information as to the 
amount these two wells were pumping and Bowing. They Bow naturally but 
pumping adds to the output. The two wells together must have passed the 
1,000 barrel mark to supply the called for deliveries. In its drilling work 
this company has three strings of tools running this season. A year ago it 




General View of the Propartj of the Waster n Union Oil Company, Santa Maria District. 

had only one, showing the impetus that prospective higher prices is giving 
to drilling. The Standard still gets this company's oil, but when the presant 
contract expires it will have to give better prices for the next contract, I have 
good reasons to believe. 

In going over the good hill road eastward on to the Union's lease there 
w< re no gates to encounter. The Pinal, the Brookshire and the Union Oil 
Companies' roads cross each others' territory and they are very harmonious 
about everything else. As we were passing the Union Oil Company was 
changing its field delivery pipe to one of much larger caliber and passing 
diagonally through the Brookshire Oil Company's territory, with its fullest 
consent. The Brookshire in turn receive the same privileges where they cross 
the Union 's territory. 

The Union. Oil Company. 

Following eastward are the Fox & Hobbs lease of the Union Oil. We have 
BeveraJ times referred to these wells. Though this territory has fine wells and 
is good paying property, it is not generally known that sometimes dry holes 
are encountered. Two or three wells on these leases have that record. The 
oil formation thinned out, so that it was drilled through before it was realized. 
In one instance also water as encountered at, the bottom of the hole which 
spoilt even the upper oil formation from producing. These are some few of 
the vicissitudes that have to be encountered, but they are not really very 
serious taking tin' average production into consideration. The Union is, how- 
ever, drilling more vigorously on its other leases. The formation here may not 
be as productive as some of the top of the hill leases. 

The Union throughout the field has a fine lighting system for its wells. 
.\ special electric light plant on the Folsom lease furnishes electric light to 
earli well — the only safe light for gassy wells. A complete independent system 
id' phones conned tin- wells with the central office at Orcutt, thus being in 
close touch with the ma uageim nt head quarters, 

From the Hnbbs lease one can see the Rice Ranch Oil Company's wells. 
This company advantageously sells to the Union at present, and has two good 
w<lls. The Union also has the control of the next lease, what is known as the 
Kaiser wells. Xo. 1 of this lease is being deepened though it once flowed mud 
oil. It, has recently been decreasing in yield. 

To those unfamiliar with these field the formation is not understood. 
When oil is struck a large flow may often he encountered on account of the 
gas pressure. As this pressure is relieved the well rapidly decreases in yield. 
By deepening the well into the oil formation the vitality of the well is recover 
ed and a vt'vy much more permanent flow may be secured. 



Kaiser No. 2 is delivering oil. No. ;t is in oil and No. 1 is rapidly going 
down. 

X " ' Of Hall A Hall is in this Vicinity, has f 1,1 ;1 Letter Supply of oil 

bj deepening the well. No. 2 is drilling at a lour, point of the land. 

Altogether this nook of the w Is combines a buaj center with a very 

picturesque landscape. 

At the top of the Canyon, the Dome, an independent company has two 
w©Ms. No. I is of the usual average type, though shallower in reaching the 
oil, No. 2 is well along drilling. .1. p. Goodwin, the Pinal « ompanj 'a manager, 
is the superintendent. 

Passing on southward we cuss the New Pennsylvania's field. No. l pen 
etrated unfa> orable formation, but No. 2 is proving the territory good I 

presume it was around the 2,400 foot level. 

\tier crossing the broad Newlove Ranch tract, tin- property of the Tnion 

Oil Company, we enter the Western Union oil Company's land, the pioneer iu 
the field. This reminds me that it is only four years since this field was proven 
by this company to be a good oil field. For one year and a half they had been 
experimenting until the third well came in as a gusher, which at the time 
electrified the community. The Western Union has still fourteen of these 
firsl shallow wells connected with one pumping jack, that altogether yield 
only from 300 to 400 barrels of oil a day. One of its later deep wells alone 
produces double this amount. The oil from the shallow wells is heavier than 
that from the deeper ones and is pipe lined separately to Gaviota. The bulk 
of the oil — the lighter gravity — goes by pipe line to Port Harford. 

The deep wells of this field and the adjoining Graciosa Oil Company all 
hug a certain contiguous swale in the formation — a strikingly prolific oil lake. 
The three new Newlove oil Company's wells are started right around here also 
to tap this rich find. To the East the field seems to deepen very rapidly and 
only one well. No. 30, is drilling, and they call it a wild-catter. No. 31 is 
the last rig and is just about spudding in. Jt follows the field of least resist- 
ance, hugging again the proven territory. What human nature is evinced in 
not leaving the beaten track. Well No. 29 is the last listed as a producer. 
The Standard Oil Company takes the light oil; but recently it has only called 
for its minimum contract. Whether it is short of steamers at Port Harford, or 
whether it has some other reason for demanding less oil is not our meddlesome 
concern — we presume they would be justified in saying. But the news gatherer 
is like the lax gatherer — a necessary evil. We may sometimes be barking too 
much, but then with it all we have never been known to bite. 

('amp life is quiet and sedate hereabout. Mr. Cole, the superintendent, 
literally substantiates this impression as well. 

We move on aud over the line and come to the Graciosa Oil Company's 
property. This company with its affiliated pipe line company and associated 
California Petroleum Refineries, Ltd., is going to make a stir in the field. 
As remarked in previous issues the field is anxiously awaiting the completion 
of its pipe line to Port Harford, affording a further and necessary additional 
outlet. 




View of a part of the Property of the Pinal oil Company, Santa Maria District. 

The Graciosa Oil Company has seven wells and will probably rapidly 
increase his number. Six of them are deep and fine wells. To Mr. A. Phillips 
is the credit of bringing in the present type of deep wells, first begun in this 
field. The absence of foreman Woods prevented us from gathering any partic- 
ulars from the property. 

Returning towards Santa ^laria we come to the top of the divide of hills, 
aboul lino feet above sea level and face a most picturesque view. The day was 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



clear and afforded a scope of view from the Pine Mountains eighty miles east, 
to the Port Harford hills thirty miles northerly. Had we had a field glass 
we could have discerned Port Harford wharf and any vessels thereabouts. 
Orcutt was comparatively close by and Santa Maria city about nine miles 
distant. 

We enter here close together the California Coast, the Squires and the 
Folsom properties, all the Union Oil Company's leases, which with Orcutt 
town we will refer to in our next. 

Before parting with our readers we want to accredit our more than usual 
chatty digressions to the good company we were in. I had the Presbyterian 
minister of Santa Maria, Rev. Chapman, with me, and we chatted on many 
diverse topics, and though Pacific Mining & Oil Reporter's readers may not 
be interested in hearing any social, ethical or religious discussions, the drift 
of my notes thus did not partake of the dry statistical detail of telling for 
instance that Well No. 8 of the John Doe lease was 1789 1-4 ft. deep in 
brown shale, with of course either good or bad prospects of oil. 

L. K Blochman. 



SOUTHERN FIELDS 



Los Angeles District. 

Special Correspondence. 

The business is still "looking up." Local oil men were well pleased with 
the news that the Kern River producers are to receive 27^ cents per barrel 
for their oil. It assures them that no Kern River oil will be sent south to 
compete with the local product. Field work here is as active as ever, and 
while .several new wells are brought in each month, in the Salt Lake field 
there does not seem to be any surplus oil in sight anywhere. Considerable 
cleaning out is being done in the old city field, and the production thus in- 
creased, but the price remains strong with a tendency to advance. 

In the Salt Lake field, A. P. Gilmore is building another rig on his proper- 
ty north of the Amalgamated. Mr. Gilmore is now running two strings of 
tools. To a man up a tree it looks as if Mr. Gilmore had in his 156 acres a very 
valuable property. 

The Westland and Clarke & Sherman are also building new rigs and are 
rushing work on their properties. 

The Brea Ranch Oil Company, a new concern to enter the field, has its 
rig up for No. 1 and will begin drilling shortly. It is said the Hancocks from 
whom the Amalgamated leases, is back of the enterprise. They have begun 
operations on a strip of land between the Clarke & Sherman property and La 
Brea Boulevard. As producing wells practically summoned them, there seems 
to be no doubt as to the result — that is, if the drillers get down to the sand. 
It is said the owners let a contract to drill this well at 60 cents per foot. A 
person may only surmise as to the competency of a driller who would contract 
to drill for 60 cents per foot, or the good judgment of a company which would 
accept a bid of 60 cents. 

It is understood the Union Oil Company has suspended work on its test 
well south of the Associated property. It is said the hole was put down nearly 
3,000 feet and nothing in paying quantity was found deeper than the shallow 
sand which is encountered at about 800 feet. 

E. A. Clampett, the well known oil man, is a candidate for councilman 
from his ward — the second. This is the ward in which all the oil wells of the 
old city field are located, and producers in that district seem to think the 
time is ripe for an oil man to represent them in councils, especially as there 
has been threats by the present council to compel all well owners to remove 
the derricks and other appurtenances, which are so unsightly. 
Whittier District. 

The Whittier field looks like a busy one these days, and the main reason 
is that the Central Oil Company is putting on new strings of tools as fast as 
possible in order to drill twenty-five more wells. This company is paying 
a fair dividend, and recently put a considerable block of stock on the market 
to furnish money for development work, which stock by the way was gobbled 
up promptly by present stockholders. This combination of circumstances has 
pushed the stock from about ,85 cents to $1.15. The company is capitalized 
at one million, but it has an immense acreage much of which is probably oil 
land, so with good management there is no reason why the stock should not 
advance still more. With the exception of the one prospect hole being drilled 
on Section 15, about two miles northwest of present developments, the company 
is confining its work to territory which has been proven, and is getting good 
wells. It is the purpose to increase the production if possible to 50,000 barrels 
per month. It is now about 30,000 barrels. 

The Murphy Oil Company is building more rigs preparatory to doing more 
development work, although at present it is only running one string in this 
district. The company has sold all its production for a fair price and pro- 
poses to increase it as rapidly as possible. This company's Coyote Hill proper- 
ty is still a mystery as the well has not yet been put to producing. The com- 
pany is drilling another well, however, as also the Union on its property ad- 
jacent, and there is some talk of other concerns starting up in the neighbor- 
hood, so it appears that those interested are satisfied with the showing already 
made. 



The Turner, Fidelity, Whittier-Fillinore and Warner ".ompanies are all 
drilling but all are in proven territory and fair wells are seen to result. The 
fact is the real limits of the producing area in the Whittier field have not 
been extended in any direction for five or six years, and it is not likely that 
the field will ever be an extensive one. 

Fullerton District. 

This field is located on the same range of hills as the Whittier field and 
may some day be connected with the latter but at present it is far ahead of 
Whittier in actual extent and the output is nearly double. In fact, the 
Fullerton field is destined to be one of the big fields of the state, as I have 
probably said before. At present it is one of the busiest fields in the state, 
probably the busiest. Aside from the Santa Fe which uses its own product, 
the Union Oil Company purchases most of the production paying the prevailing 
market price less ten cents per barrel, which is deducted for marketing ex- 
penses. It is said the Union takes about 90,000 barrels per month from this 
field, which is applied on a contract at 48 cents, and which has several years 
yet to run. Deducting 10 cents for pipeage it will be seen that it will net 
the producer only 38 cents, which is not a particularly happy prospect, but 
matters will no doubt even themselves up in time, as the producers have con- 
fidence in the honest purposes of the Union Oil Company. 

The Columbia Oil Company's No. .13 is the largest well in the field. It 
has been producing fifteen days, and has put out about 20,000 barrels of oil. 
It will settle down to a good 1,000-barrel well and makes this property the 
best 100 acres in the entire field. It is in the center of the district and is 
surrounded by good producers. Work on No. 14 has been begun, and the hole 
is about 150 feet deep. 

The Puente Oil Company, 50 per cent of which is owned by the Columbia 
Oil Company is drilling two wells. All this Company 's production is used 
in its refinery in being made up into gasoline distillates, etc., and its man- 
ager recently stated that they could dispose of twice their present output if 
they had it. The Puente, by the way, is the biggest competitor the Standard 
Oil Company has, in the retail trade, and the efforts of the Standard to block 
them and crush them would make a long story. 

Graham & Loftus have just completed a water plant which will supply 
their properties hereafter. Most of the companies here, heretofore, have 
bought their water from the Union. 

The new 6-ineh pipe line of the Union Oil Company from this field to Los 
Angeles is nearly completed. 

COALING A DISTRICT 

A new company, known as the Aladin has been incorporated under the 
laws of the state of California with a capitalization of $200,000 to work and 
operate the 20 acres directly west of the Lucile Oil Company's well No. 1, in 
the Coalinga field. This is in absolutely proven territory. Inasmuch as the 
promoters are all old oil men, good progress should be made and with the log 
of the Lucile as a guide its well should be finished up in a very satisfactory 
manner. The company's home office is in San Francisco. 

Another meritous company that has just started operations in this field 
is the Section Six Oil Company with its home office in Los Angeles. This 
company will take over what is known as the Van Derzee property and will 
repair up and finish the well that was started by them. 

The Esperanza Oil & Land Company has its water well finished and will 
commence drilling its well No. 1 shortly. 

The Manchester Oil Company has its well No. 1 down 530 feet in its 10- 
inch casing. It is encountering a heavy flow of water which will be cut off 
soon and a string of 8-inch casing put in with which it is expected to complete 
the well. 

The Shreves Oil Company has cut off the water in its well No. 1 with its 
8-inch casing at 2,130 feet. A string of 6-inch easing is being put in which 
it is hoped to complete its well. 

The West Coalinga Oil Company spudded in its well No. 1 last week and 
is making good progress. Twelve and one-half inch casing is being used to 
start with and it is hoped that it can be carried down to the big sand which 
was encountered at from 1,500 to 1,600 feet in the Lucile well. 

The Michigan Oil & Development Company is putting in its string of 
8-inch drive pipe at its well No. 1 which has reached a depth of 1,000 feet. 
Its prospect is very promising so far as the formation is the same as in the 
proven field. 

Well No. 14 of the California Monarch Oil Company, on section 26-19-15 
is 2,830 feet deep with more than 300 feet of very prolific oil sand. It is de- 
veloping a very strong gas pressure and all indications point to a big pro- 
ducer. An earthern reservoir is now being constructed to take care of the 
oil when it makes it flow which is now expected at any time. The various 
wells of the company on section 31-19-15 are producing regularly and making 
a lot of oil. 

Well No. 5 of the California Diamond Oil Company on section 12-19-15 is 
over 1,800 feet in 10-inch pipe. The formation is very favorable and it is 
hoped that the well will be finished at a depth of no more than 2,400 or at 
the most 2,500 feet. 



PACIFIC MININC & OIL REPORTEU 



llifomia * New York oil loinpanys wells are :ill producing regul 
arly and uninterruptedly as usual. 

The Si • *>il L'ompaaj has its well No. .", ,l,,wii l.oiin feet in 7 :, s 

easing will- .| showing ,,f oil. Il is BZpMtad that thf well will !„■ 

finish,', 1 up at about 1,500 I 

A - l an oil man down last week !,, look over 

an,l report on the land south of Coalings. II,' took mm automobile from a local 
garage aad spout all day along the lino of the outcroppingi as far down as the 
Deril'a Den. Wo look for a very favorable report. 

Roberl Hayes Smith spont s.'voral days in town recently looking over his 
intonate here ami below town and is very enthusiastic over thi now devclo i- 
Bent work south of town, having at one time put down a well in what is 
known as the IVvil's Dan district which looked very promising but w.-is not 

A largo amount ,,t' assessment work is being 'lone throughout the Held and 
as far south as the lVvil 's Den. 

The outlook for Ix-ttor prices is very encouraging. Offers of 2j cents for 
daily runs is being made with but few salos, :in cents being what is demanded. 
Others arc holding out for even more. 

The Banting A Hrix nil Company has its well No. 1 producing. 

The Kern Trading A (HI Company has its well in very good shape ami is 
getting a very good production. 

The Commercial Petroleum Company is making very good headway on its 
well No. It ami have snmls which look very encouraging. 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY SECURES BIG OIL CONTRACT 



Three and One-half Millions of Barrels of Kern River Oil Purchassd by One 
of California's Big Oil Companies. 



Company Now Has Plenty of Oil in Sight to Fill Its 
Requiremenls for the Next Year. 

As the result of a meeting held last week between the Associated Oil 
Company ami the Independent Oil Producers' Agency of the Kern Eiver field 
950,000 barrels held in storage by the Independent Company was sold to the 
Associated, at a gross price of 25c. per barrel, and the entire product of the Inde- 
pendent wells for the coming year estimated at no less than 2,500,000 barrels 
contracted at a price of 27%c. per barrel. Out of the 23c. per barrel for the stor- 
age oil the Independent must pay the Associated 3c. per barrel rental, the oil 
being in the Associated 's reservoirs. The net price for the storage oil is, 
therefore, 22 cents per barrel, or $2119,000 for the 950,000 barrels. This with 
the income for the output of the coming year will amount to about $1,000,000, 
or the largest single contract for oil ever negotiated in this State. 

The Independent are jubilant at the result of the negotiations. The first 
payment of $100,000 for the stored oil will be made on the 20th of December 
and will be a very acceptable "Christmas present" to many of the companies 
embraced by the Agency. The second payment of $100,000 will be made some 
time in April. The production of the wells will be paid for monthly as for 
daily runs. 

The increase in price amounts to approximately 10 cents per barrel. Last 
year's output was contracted at 18 cents per barrel with a storage clause 
calling for one-third of the output to be placed in the Associated 's reservoirs 
with option for that company to purchase at the highest bid. A storage charge 



■ nts per barrel was to be made. It is the storage thus accumulated that 

is now being disposed of at (209, making last year's on 

practically B0 cents per barrel. 

li is believed that tin- log advance in price, amounting to nearly SO per 
,-ent will greatly stimulate activity in the Kern River Sold. Many wells that 

have been shut down pen. hug negotiations will be put on I lie pump : 

is every reason in believe that many wells will be drilled in this Said the 
coming year with goo, I results, Despite thi general "knocking" ami claims 
to the contrary there is a vast amount of proven territory in the Kern River 
Held that can be profitably drilled at 27'.. rents per barrel, and many a com- 
panj will be producing a g I amount of oil in this field after the present 

generation lone pass, , I to their reward. 

The present production ,,f the Kern River field is 34,500 barrels daily. 

The greatest production of the field in its I n days was 15,000 barrels. While 

it may not be possible I,, again bring the output to the better figure, it seems 
quite within the bonds of possibility that the production will soon reach 40- 
iiiiii barrels. 

The Associated oil Company is now taking practically the entire produc- 
tion of the Held with the exeeplion of a small amount that goes to the rail- 
ma, I companies. The few individual shipments are too small in comparison to 
be taken into consideration. This puts the big company immediately in a 
position to fully take care of all of its probable demands for a long time to 
come. With its increasing production in some other parts of the State it 
looks as if the stories of a shortage are absolutely unqualified. With better 
prices at hand and the consequent increase in development it seems certain 
that a goodly supply of oil is assured for all probable demands. 



Tug "Navigator" Leaves New York with Tank Steamer "W. S. Porter' 

in Tow. 



The tug "Navigator" with the tank steamer "W. S. Porter" in tow, left 
New York November 30th bound for San Francisco. Both vessels are owned 
by the Associated Oil Company. The tug was recently purchased from the 
Scully Towing Company. 

The Navigator, one of the finest vessels of her kind in New York bay, 
will be missed by the harbor and tugboat men. She is a very powerful vessel, 
was built eight years ago, is 150 feet over all, has 26 feet beam and draws 16 
feet! Her engines are of 1,000 horse power. She was used as a committee boat 
in the international yacht races. 

The vessels are expected to cover the distance to the Golden Gate — about 
13,500 miles — in sixty days. Although a vessel of the Navigator's type 
could make the long ocean trip without help, it would be a dangerous under- 
taking and one upon which the underwriters would not take large risks. 
Much time also would be lost in calling at different ports for coal. The Porter 
uses oil for fuel and will carry 12,000 barrels for this purpose, besides a gen- 
eral cargo of 4,000 tons. It is estimated that the owners of the tug will save 
about $9,000 by having her towed. 



Knows a Good Thing. 
The Wall Street Daily News says: Why this so general attempt to dis- 
credit trading in mining stocks? Are they not perfectly legitimate subjects 
for speculation? They represent a vast industry which is waking to new life 
under propitious conditions. The products of our mines play a great part in 
.the country's development — form an essential factor of the good times pre- 
vailing. But we are told that it is foolish, if not wicked to trade in the shares 
which represent them. The logic of this is not apparent to the average naked 
eye. 



Exports of Domestic Mineral Oil, and Shipments to Alaska and Hawaii From the Pacific Ports of the 

United States, During September, 1906. 



CUSTOMS DISTRICTS 
AND COUNTRIES 


MINERAL OIL 
CRUDE 


MINERAL OIL, REFINED OR MANUFACTURED 


I, ETC. 


NAPHTHAS, ETC. 


ILLUMINATING 


LUBRICATING, ETC. 


RESIDUUI 


Domestic Exports — 


Gallons 


Dollars 


Gallons 

5.400 
",375 


Dollars 

1,009 
1,210 


Gallons 

3.86o 

",983 
I,5iO 

8,546,490 


Dollars 

748 

1,207 

253 

338,469 


Gallons 

2.903 
17,026 

39 1 
4.398 


Dollars 
1,102 

i,473 

no 

1,494 


Gallons 


Dollars 














102 


6 


2.159 
1,611 


119 

82 




IOO 


17 


Willamette 


800 


15 




Total Domestic 


Q02 


21 


16,875 


2.236 


8,563,843 


340,677 


24.7 iS 


4.179 


3.770 


201 


Shipments to Alaska- 






24,480 


4,383 


47.205 
13,930 


9,018 
1,407 


7,5H 
819 


2,444 
427 






























Shipments to Hawaii— 

From Los Angeles 


630,000 


16,900 
43,800 


1 
26.4OO 2.2S6 














'■ ' Puget Sound 


"7,750 


18,006 












3,906,000 














J,0*J 







PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



INVADE THE GOLDFIELD DISTRICT 



Well Known San Francisco Capitalists, Prominent in the Development 
California's Mineral Resources, Join Homer Wilson in Acquisition. . . 
of Property in This Wonderful District. 



of 



Charles F. Humphrey and Jno. J. Meyers, prominent in the development 
of the Mnrchie mine at Nevada City, and several other well known properties 
of the State in which they have a capital of more than a million and a half 
of dollars, have joined forces with Homer Wilson, a well known engineer, 
in the purchase of the Somerset anl Huutch Bell property, consisting of 
eighteen claims, lying between the Commonwealth and Knickerbocker proper- 
ties and adjoining the Monarch. The properties lie east of Goldfield and are 
traversed by a strong vein which has been exposed by surface trenching and 
a shallow tunnel. The ledge is from twelve to fifteen feet wide and carries 
good values in gold with an occasional kidney of high value. 

Mr. Wilson, who will have charge of the work will immediately com- 
mence work upon a new tunnel which will give a depth of about 150 feet. 
Development of the property will be pushed vigorously to gain the best re- 
sults. A corporation will be formed under the name of the Goldfield Somer- 
set Mining Company to facilitate the transaction of business, but although the 
stock will be listed, it is probable that it will not be placed upon the western 
market. 

In Homer Wilson, Humphrey and Meyers have found a man whose, judg- 
ment can be depended upon, and they are ready to spend their money in what- 
ever looks good to him, Mining men who know Mr. Wilson place great faith 
in his judgment as he has secured some of the best mines in the west. He is 
the owner of the Chloride Baily in Trinity County, is largely interested in 
the Keane Wonder, in the Funeral Range, and in the Centennial mine at Lida. 

Humphrey and Meyers are largely interested in the Bullfrog Fortuna 
mine, comprising the Pick Up and Big Chieftan at Bullfrog, located on Mont- 
gomery Mountain, 600 feet from the great Shoshone mine on which they have 
developed from eight to ten feet of the same ore that has given the Shoshone 
a market value of $20,000,000. They are also heavily interested in many mines 
at Manhattan, among which are the Manhattan-Nevada, comprising the 
Georgey, El Dorado and Copper Farm groupes, the Cowboy, Mother Lode, 
Manhattan Express, and others. 

Under the skilful management of Homer Wilson it is quite likely that this 
latest acquisition of property in Goldfield may equal, if not eclipse, many of 
the former successful ventures of these gentlemen who are numbered among 
the State 's most successful and conservative mining men. 



SILVER AND LEAD 



Something of Their Chemistry, and Different Forms of the White Metal. 



Silver and lead are two metals that nearly always occur together. Wher- 
ever lead is found in quantity, there is always some silver in with it, aud the 
reverse is also true. 

There must be a reason for this mating of the two metals. It probably lies 
in the fact that both are precipitated chlorine — they are the only metals 
except mercury, that are precipitated by this element. 

Sea water contains chlorine in abundance in the form of common salt, and 
the sea receives at one time or another most of the soluble metals. 



Suppose the rivers of some period to be charged with metaliferous salts, 
from breaking down veins, or other source. As soon as their waters reached 
the ocean, silver and lead would be separated out in the form of chloride. 
Other metals would remain in solution. Both these chlorides are soluble in 
hot alkaline waters, and both are precipitated again by sulphur water, as sul- 
phides. So there is good reason why silver and lead should be found together 
in nature. 

Silver is a white metal of specific gravity 10.6. It is found native in the 
form, generally of threads and arborescent shapes. It is found in alloys with 
several other metals and also combined with sulphur, chlorine, tellurium, etc.; 
but, unlike most metals, it is never found as an oxide, sulphate, or carbonate. 

The forms that native silver take are curious — branching and often 
feather like. This is due to a property that silver has of absorbing oxygen 
from the air, while hot, and on cooling and solidif}'ing of letting the air out 
again. This prevents the metal from forming very solid forms, and its native 
state is generally what is called arborescent. 

Native silver is not uncommon because the salts of silver are quite easily 
decomposed or reduced, by almost any organic matter, by heating with car- 
bonate of soda, and by the presence of iron or zinc in a solution of the metal. 
All these conditions are to be met with in nature. But though silver is not 
uncommon in the native state, either pure or alloyed with gold, it is found 
oftenest in the form of sulphide and, in this form, associated with galena — 
sulphide of lead. 

There is a belief among prospectors that the fine grained galena generally 
carries much silver, the eourse grained none. This is no safe guide at all, 
You can only tell whether a galena carries silver by testing it, and the easiest 
way to do this, in camp, is the following: Boast the ore, at a red heat for 
some minutes; cool, boil in a little nitric acid, add water — enough to make a 
tumblerful of solution out of about a thimble full of the acid solution — then 
add a little solution of common salt. If there is silver you will get a white 
curdy precipitate of chloride of silver, which coagulates together on boiling 
and is soluble in ammonia solution. Or you can heat the powdered ore in 
an old frying pan "with about one-tenth its weight of salt and one-twentieth 
its weight of sulphate of iron till all sulphur fumes 'have come off. Then 
cool it, add more salt, and mix up with water to the consistency of a thick 
cream. Put a polished piece of copper in this — a one-cent piece will do — and 
after about ten minutes take it out. If silver were in the ore, the copper will 
have been coated with a white-gray coating of the metal. 

Another common ore of silver is the chloride — horn silver. This is a very 
unmistakeable ore, as it is wax like and can be easily cut with the knife. Its 
color is greenish or bluish gray. It fuses in the flame of a candle and the 
blade of a knife, rubbed with it, will become silvered. 

Other ores of silver are the following: 

Argentite — sulphuret of silver — blackish lead gray, easily cut — contains 
about 87 per cent of silver. 

Pyrargyrite — ruby silver — a sulphide of silver and antimony — black to 
red, but scratches red — is soft, fuses easily and gives an odor of garlic on 
being heated — contains 59.8 per cent of silver. 

Stephanite — black silver — sulphide of antimony and silver, with 68.5 per 
cent silver — is iron-black in color and scratch. A drop of acide on the ore will 
silver a piece of copper rubbed on it. 

Stromeyerine — a sulphide of silver and copper — 53 per cent silver. Is 
lead gray in color and scratches black. 

Sternbergite — sulphide of silver and iron — 33 per cent silver — black. 



! 




HIS, 10 




CO 



Carry in Stock a Complete Line of 

OIL COUNTRY TUBULAR GOODS 
DRILLING RIGS and OIL WELL SUPPLIES 



Bakersfield 



Los Angeles 



Santa Maria 






I 

J 



PACIFIC MINING & oil. REPORTER 



per 



" r '•!•■ of »ilrei greenish yellow, soft, contains 57 

- Ivor. 

I" li v.r yellow eaailj 1 ul contains tr. per cent 

silver. 

AH I silver are fairly soft and all yield bright silver by being 

irl ate of soda on charcoal, with the blowpipe. 

There ••:m not l».- said i" be any particular formation, nr age, which carries 
silver more than another, but proximity of andesite, or dykes of r...-k ..1 a 
*iniilnr nature 1 i> tndeaite, appear to govern the ifistributioii of silver t< :i 
very l:irj:<- extent.— Loa Angeles Uining Review. 



MINERAL RESOURCES OF COALINGA 



li has often been stated that If it were nut for the oil business, t'na!: ng.-i 
would be a thing of the past, but we think it time for those people to take into 
consideration its huge deposits of minerals. 

Without a doubt, the best paying proposition in this locality, aside from 
the oil, is the quicksilver mines at New tdra, situated about Jil miles from 
Coalings in what is known as Bear Canyon. These mines have been worked 
for several years and mueh high grade ore taken out. The Company has its 
own treating plant and is working on a large seale. Several other Cinnebar 
locations have been made near Coalinga, some of which show ore as good as 
that from the New Idra mine. 

Probably the next best mineral prospect in this field is its large 
Qypsum beds. Several experts have visited them during the last year with 
the result that Eastern people have become interested and it is probable that 
at no distant date will be a source of mueh interest and activity. 

Fullers Earth is found in very large quantities in this vicinity and would 
have been worked before this if it was not for the extremely low price that 
it brings in the market. 

Several large deposits of Asbestos have been located at no great distance 
from the town of Coalinga. Experts say that it is of a very good quality. 

Large bodies of Cement have been discovered a few miles south of town, 
and a company has bought up several thousands of acres of land in anticipa- 
tion of working it. Work has already begun in the way of getting buildings 
in shape and supplies ready to begin working it in the near future. With 
the railroad only a short distance away a good money maker and dividend 
payer should be the result. 

A Lime Rock is to be found in considerable quantities where it could 
easily be handled. Specimens of this rock is to every appearance as good as 
that now worked at Santa Cruz. 

A little Gold and Silver is found in this locality and we are told that 
Colour can be found in nearly all the creek beds of the county. 

Although no large deposits of Sulphur have been located, it is claimed that 
there is considerable of it scattered throughout the entire range of hills west 
of town. 

Large deposits of Coal is found on Section 26-20-14 which at one time was 
worked to a good advantage. A large force of men were employed. Many a 
man in Coalinga today can say that he got his start in these Coal mines. The 
Southern Pacific Railroad at one time had a spur track to these mines and 
bought a large amount of its output. But with the decrease in the uses of coal 
on the coast it was deemed best to close down. 



ACTIVITY IN COPPER 



Many Years Since Industry Was Prosperous as Now. 



The Mining World says: Twenty-five years have passed since tin copper 
industry was as prosperous as it is today. The record high price current in 
1906 has been due to the extraordinary demand, which indicates a consumption 
in excess of the production both here and abroad. A suggestion that the mar- 
ket will continue high indefinitely is made by the producers who have sold 
copper for future delivery at prices that approach the schedule of the famous 
French syndicate which reached its zenith in 1880. In 1906 the extreme quota- 
tions for hake copper at New York were 18% to 22% cents per pound. Pro- 
duct ion by these mines for the nine months ending September is estimated al 
168,891,200 pounds, as against. 166,162,480 pounds in the corresponding period 
last year; an increase of 2,728,720 pounds, or 2.6 per cent. Dividends paid by 
eight Lake companies from January to October, 1006, amounted to $11,396,624, 
bringing their total disbursements since incorporation to $137, 71)5, 94s on an 
issued capitalization of $53,781,850. 

The electrolytic copper industry has shared well in the country's prosper- 
ity, and after years of ups and downs the Amalgamated company's sharehold- 
ers will again receive dividends at the rate of 8 per cent per annum. Produc- 
tion in the Butte district is growing rapidly, and for the first nine months of 
the current year the quantity is calculated at 270,338,954 pounds. To )„• sure 
Montana will again occupy first place as a copper producer, although Arizona 
is making a strong fight.' Electrolytic copper sold this year at 1 s ' s I" 22% 
cents per pound in cakes, and wire bars f. o. b. New York. Dividend pay- 
ments by six Montana, one Tennessee, one Utah, and one Wyoming company 
for the ten months to October, this year, amount to $29,214,314 sin,-,, incorpora- 
tion on an outstanding share capitalization of $2611,761.400. 

Judging from the" payment of $41.2n7,027 in dividends liy seventeen cop- 
per companies so far this year will establish on enviable record. 



Have you seen our 

CALIFORNIA DIAMOND BX 

Casing and Drive Pipe? It's the 
thing for deep wells. Made in fol- 
lowing sizes and weights, and 
carried in stock at all our stores 



Size 


Weight 


Size 


Weight 


55/8 inches 


20 lbs. 


q5/s inches 


33 lbs 


6%[ inches 


20 lbs. 


11^8 inches 


40 lbs 


6^/8 inches 


20 lbs. 


i2}/£ inches 


40 lbs 


9> l /l inches 


28 lbs. 








DRIVE) 


r*ir*E> 






Size 


Weight 






4^2 inches 


15 lbs 





THE NATIONAL SUPPLY COMPANY 

117 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

BRANCH STORES 

Coalinga, Cal. Bakersfleld, Cal. Orcutt, Cal. 

TUBULAR BOILERS 



Large Dome 
Dry Steam 
Assured 
Full 
Capacity 




Easy access 

to every 

part for 

Cleaning, 

Examination 

and 

Repairs 



25 h, p. to 90 h, p, on hand For immediate delivery 



Made of best Flange Tested Steel. Tubes of best American manufacture and of 
standard gauge; Rivets of best quality ; Fixtures heavy and durable. Every 
boiler complete, including following fixtures and fittings: Half arch front, com- 
plete with fire ctnd ash doors 17x17 inches, with draft dampers ; anchor bolts 
for front gates and bearers ; rear arch bars ; cleanout door and frame ; wall- 
plates and rollers ; smoke stack and guy wire; pop safety valve; steam gauge 
and syphon ; water column of large capacity, complete with water gauge and 
three gauge cocks ; blow-off cock; feed valve and check valve with nipples. 

Portable outfits and everything required for drilling; or boring 
Tesl wells. Brass Goods, Fitttiigs and Valves of all descriptions. 



Write for prices 



R. H. HER RON CO., affiliated with the 

OIL WELL SUPPLY CO 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

212 North Los Angeles St. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Ill Townsend St. 



IO 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER. 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 

The Oil and Mining Authority of the Pacific Coast 
Published Semi-Monthly by 

Pacific Oil Reporter Company 

Incorporated 



EDWARD S. EASTMAN 
MARIA R. WINN 
KARL R. EASTMAN 



Managing Editor 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Field Manager 



OFFICE AND EDITORIAL HOOMS 

Suite 37 Saint Mungo Building, 1300 Golden Gate Avenue 

San Francisco, California 

TELEPHONE WEST 6677 



Subscription price, $2.00 per year, in advance, to any part of the United States, Canada 
or Mexico. Add $1.00 for foreign subscriptions. 



Entered as second-class matter Nov. 5th, 1906, at the Post Office at San Francisco, Cal., 
under an Act of Congress of March 3, 1879. 



QUICKLY GAINED WEALTH 

Big Fortunes Made in a Few Days in Wonderful Goldfield. 



Along with the story of the phenomenal Mohawk Mine at Goldfield, whose 
stock jumped from 3 cents to $19.00 in less than a year, go other stories of 
quickly gained wealth — stories of men and women who became rich almost in 
a night, advancing their condition from almost abject poverty to comparative 
luxury. 

A waiter employed in a well known restaurant in San Francisco invested, 
about one year ago, $300 in Mohawk stock at 3 cents per share — the $300 re- 
presenting his savings for several years. He admits that he was somewhat 
intoxicated when the transaction was made. When he became sober he wept 
tears of remorse at having parted with his hard earned money. He was 
recently seen on the streets of Goldfield, his hollow eyes and careworn face 
indicating the most intense mental agony. Showing his stock certificate to a. 
friend he said that he had been to every broker in Goldfield and they one and 
all had offered him $190,000 for his 10,000 shares. He said that he could turn 
the $190,000 into 700,000 francs, go back to his native parish in France and, 
after lifting his various relatives to positions of comfort, still be the richest 
man in the community. What should he do? He had not slept a wink for 
three days or nights trying to decide. He had but $80 of ready money, was 
living in cheap lodging houses and eating at lunch counters. 

He was advised to put his stock in a bank for safety and go to work 
while he watched his holdings go from $19.00 to $40.00 a share, a price that 
even the most conservative admit the Mohawk will soon reach. He acted 
upon the advice and is now patiently awaiting the time when he can realize 
$400,000 from a $300 investment. It was a profitable drunk for the French- 
man. 

Never before in the mining history of the United States has there been 
such an amazing tale of suddenly acquired riches as that which is being told 



this week here in Goldfield. Stocks which a year ago were being vainly 
hawked on the streets at eight to ten cents a share have sold as high as $19.00. 
Mines which were optimistically capitalized at $1,000,000 are developing into 
bonanzas with $50,000,000 or more in sight and further untold millions in un- 
doubled prospect. As fast as the stock in any mine is put upon the market 
it is oversubscribed twenty times over and double in value with almost in- 
credible swiftness. The whole country is buying Goldfield stock to such an 
extent that the orders pouring in upon all local brokers until in many instances 
they have closed their doors. A tidal wave is the only adequate metaphor 
descriptive of these conditions as they actually exist. 

To dimly realize the effect this boom is having on the fortunes of every 
man and woman who invested even the most meager sums in Goldfield stocks, 
whether during the last year or as late as yesterday, one does not have to 
travel farther than the nearest corner of a San Francisco or Goldfield street. 
In every store, restaurant, or saloon, visible from the corner chosen, there is 
somebody who is richer by just so many hundreds or thousands of dollars than 
he was a month ago. The bootblack who owns the little stand at Crook and 
Main streets, Goldfield, paid $140 for five hundred shares of Silver Pick last 
August, and sold his holdings recently at a net profit of $350. The barber 
who can be seen working at the chair nearest the window, a few doors beyond, 
made what he thought was a daring investment last July, by borrowing $370 
with which to buy 1000 shares of Combination Fraction. Last Wednesday 
afternoon he sold his stock, repaid his loan and put $1750 in the bank. 

In the offices of the big concerns, like those of the Sullivan Trust Company, 
for instance, it is the simple fact that every stenographer, every clerk, every 
bookkeeper has made a big or little pot of money by investments in the mining 
stocks of either Goldfield, Tonopah, Fairview or Manhattan investments, 
especially some of those made by the young women, of the most haphazard 
character. A particularly interesting case is afforded by Tommy Nugent, the 
seventeen-year old office boy employed by this firm. About a year ago, Tommy, 
who has been earning his own bread since he was twelve, spent the $100 
which he had painfully saved out of his earnings of four years, and another 
$100 which he received as his share of a dead uncle 's estate, for 2000 shares 
of Mohawk. As may be readily reckoned, the price per share for this stock, 
when Tommy bought it, was ten cents. Recently this office boy sold his Mo- 
hawk holdings for $30,000 in cold cash. 

Other reapings in Mohawk recorded in the Sullivan office were those of 
Mary Ryan, for sixteen years a servant in Larry Sullivan's household, and 
of Mrs. Peter Grant, whose husband is Larry Sullivan's partner. It happened 
that both these purchases of Mohawk were made on the same day, the day 
curiously enough, when Tommy got his tip from his boss, who is credited with 
a "clean up" of a cold million on the rise in Mohawk. Mary, who had saved 
$500 from her sixteen years of toil, and who said she had bought Mohawk 
because she "got such a lot av us for th* money," sold her little block of 
5000 shares for $75,000. Mrs. Grant, who explained to her friends that she 
had spent $300 on Mohawk "because it was such a tempting bargain," realized 
$45,000. 

Stories of luck like this could be written around Goldfield by the ream. 
And, indeed, considering the circumstances, this luck is only a part of a big 
spectacle. The palmiest days of the Comstock lode, the halycon era of Mackey, 
Flood and O'Brien, the best that ever could be said of Cripple Creek, these 
were pale and spineless sagas, compared with the saga that is being sung of 
Goldfield. 



Hammond 
Iron Works 

Warren, Pa. 

U. S. A. 



Builders of 

Steel Tanks 

of the 

Highest • 

Grade 




Stills 

Condensors 

Agitators 

General 

Oil Refinery 

Work 



SALES AGENTS 

Herman Nieter 

29 Broadway 
New York. 

Krumbhaar&Aiken 

201 Defiegre Building 
New Orleans 



PACIFIC MINING -S: OIL REPORTI-.R 



The influx of people it something tremendous ami the accommodations are 
far inadequate to the most humble requirements. The writer lias seen dozens 
of men and women turned away from the hotels in a single night, while stories 
of people paying $3.00 per night for a ehair in which to sit out tho cold nights 
in some hotel office room are common. 

A well known newspaper man recently bought 10,000 shares of stock in 
the Goldfield Daisy upon leaving tloldfield one day. and. arriving at San Fran* 
cisco next morning found himself $10,000 richer, the stock having jumped 
♦ 1.00 a share in twentv-four hours. 



II 



DON'T KNOCK 

If there is a chance to liooin 1'iisinoss. boom i!. Pon't he a knocker. Don'1 
pull a long face and get sour on your stomach. Hope a bit. Get a smile on 
Hold up your head. Qel a hold with both hands. Then pull. Bury your 
hatchet. Drop your tomahawk. Hide your little hammer. When a stranger 
drops in tell him your town is the greatest on earth. It is. Don't get mulish. 
Don't roast. He jolly. Get popular. It's dead easy. Help yourself along. 
Push your friend with yon. Soon you'll have a whole procession. He a good 

fellow. 

No man ever helped himself by knocking other people down. No man ever 
got rich trying to make people believe that he was the only good man on earth. 
You can't climb the latter of fame by stepping on other people's corns. They're 
their corns, not yours. And they're tender. Keep off the corns. 

All men are not alike. Onee in a while you may find one who is very much 
alike. But some are different. You're not the only shirt in the wash. If you 
don't like their style, let 'em alone. Don't knock. You'll get used to it. 
There's no end of fun in minding your own business. And it makes other 
people like you better. Better have others get stuck on you than get stuck on 
yourself. Nobody gets stuck on a knocker. Don 't be one. Be good. 



Record Discovers More Muck. 

The Coalinga "Oil" Record has made the discovery that there were nine 
wells lost in the Coalinga field during the month of September. Again this 
knocking sheet, with its garbled news columns and ' ' patent insides, ' ' gets 
down into the mud and filth and tries to show a superior knowledge of things 
foreign to the limited brain capacity of those who are responsible for its un- 
fortunate existence. Accuse the ignorant and they will always answer "lie," 
but it is no defense. Pacts are facts, and the oil men of this state know where 
to place their confidence, and it is certainly not with the sheet that is so 
wrapped up in dirty, mud-throwing work that it can never see the prosperous 
or meritorious side of the oil industry and the companies that have spent 
their time and money in making this the greatest oil producing state in the 
Union. But ' ' lie down with dogs and you will get up with fleas on you ' '. 
So far as we are concerned we shall deem it advisable to let the nefarious 
sheet in question eke out its questionable existence unnoticed and unad- 
vertised. 

If we are to believe the Coalinga ' ' Oil ' ' Record, the ' ' Alaska ' ' Oil Com- 
pany is about to commence operations in Section 6-19-15, and the Lucile Oil 
Company is already operating there. ThiB is a fair example of the correctness 
of the matter contained in the columns of this sheet. Section 6-19-15 is in 
reality twelve miles from the real location of the ' ' Alaska ' ' and the Lucile, 
and in a part of the field believed to be out of the oil producing territory. 
Such misrepresentations are certainly a discredit to any company on which 
they reflect and an injury to the field. They tend to give those who are not 
in a position to know, a false impression of the value of the companies which 
are really meritorious and operating in absolutely proven territory. As a mat- 
ter of fact the company in question is the Aladin Oil Company and is located 
in Section 6-21-15, where the Lucile Company already has a good well. 



PRODUCTION OF COAL IN CALIFORNIA IN 1905 



The total production ,,t coal in California during 1906 was 77,050 short 
I allied at $882,725. These ligurcs are taken from the report of Jlr. E. 
W. Parker of the United States Geological Survey. 

The principal feature of interest connected with the production oj coal in 
California has been the apparently successful efforts to utilize the lignite or 
-i,i. bituminous coals produced in the state in the manufacture of briquettes. 

During 1905 there were four Of these plants in operation. One, at Stockton, 

was operated by the San Francisco and San Joaquin Coal Company, which 

use, I the lignite or sub bituminous coal produced at the Tesla mine owned by 
tin. same company. Unfortunately, this plant was destroyed by tin- in No- 
vember, 1905, and the plans for its rebuilding, this time at San Francisco, have 
been interrupted by the earthquake and lire which nearly destroyed that city 
in April of the present year. Another plant constructed in Oakland by the 
Western Fuel Company upon designs prepared by Mr. Robert Schorr, of San 
Francisco, was put in operation .luring the latter part of the year. The third 
plant, a small one, owned by the Ajax Coal Company, of San Francisco, was 
in operation during most of the year, and the fourth, which was built at An- 
tioch, was not completed until the latter part of the year. All of these plants 
were constructed for the purpose of using the California lignites of sub-bitum- 
inous coals, sometimes with and sometimes without a mixture of "Wellington" 
and other bituminous screenings obtained at the coal yards, and using asphaltic 
pitch as a binder. This pitch is obtained as a residue from California crude 
petroleum which when properly distilled yields a pitch possessing excellent 
binding qualities. 

The briquettes make a good domestic fuel and are also much better adapt- 
ed for use under boilers than the raw fuel from which they are made. The 
use of them or of the raw coals in California, however, has been much less 
than it would have been because of the greatly increased production of petro- 
leum, and of its use for steam-raising purposes in both locomotive and 
stationary boilers. As a result of this the production of coal and lignite in 
California has shown a decreasing tendency during the last five years. 



Santa Maria Arrives at San Francisco. 

A notable arrival at San Francisco last week was the large tank steamer 
Santa Maria, Captain Lane, eighty-five days from Baltimore, sixty-five days 
from Wilmington, Del., and twenty-nine days from Punta Arenas, in the 
Straits of Magellan. The Santa Maria was formerly the Atlantic liner Minne- 
tonka, but was purchased by the Union Steamship Company, an adjunct of the 
Union Oil Company, and converted into an oil carrier. She is to be used in 
the Pacific trade. 

Her two smokestacks give her an imposing appearance. She has a net 
tonnage of 3,860, and is a sister ship of the Santa Rita, formerly the Minne- 
waska, which is now out twenty-nine days from New York for this city. This 
steamer is at Montevideo, where she put in last Tuesday with her cargo shift- 
ed, and after a portion of her cargo had to be jettisoned. 

The Santa Maria is commanded by Captain Lane, formerly in service on 
this coast. The steamers tanks are filled with 6,000 tons of merchandise for 
this coast. For the last two days before reaching port the Santa Maria was 
in heavy north-northwest gales, and she was given a list to starboard. 



E. M. Wilkinson representing the boiler department of the Oil Well Sup- 
ply Company, accompanied by Jno. M. Sands, vice-president and treasurer of 
the R. ~H. Herron Company which is affiliated with the Oil Well Supply Com- 
pany, have been making a tour of the state's oil fields the past two weeks. 



IviVOY Mi\JVU^AOTURi:LVi> COMPANY 

Manufacturers of 



Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet Iron 
Works 



jrmr., 


^^5B* m 




i*^ - •'* *???' 







Oil Well Casing 
Oil Stills 



OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 

Works: Cor. New Main and Date Streets, Baker Block P. O. Box 231, Station C. Telephone Main 196 

Office, 334 flofth JVlain Street, lios Angeles, Cal. 



12 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL* REPORTER 



Mr Wilkinson expressed himself as pleased at the general prosperity of the 
oil business in California which he believes to be in its infancy. 

Found Hot Sands at Goldfield. 

B B (Jushman, Cashier State Bank & Trust Company of Tonopah, and 
I L Odlie whose address is Tonopah but who is one of the largest mine own- 
ers in the state of Nevada— both familiar with mining affairs in general, and 
with the hot sands of the state in particular became Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine at Goldfield recently. It is saia that they experienced hotter sands 
than they ever had before encountered, even in the great Deatli Valley. 

CALIFORNIA 

The American Flag and other mines, all with patriotic names, at what is 
called "The Shadow of the Pines," three miles east of Camptonville, are 
being developed systematically and give promise of making their owners 
rich The tunnel at the American Flag is in 180 feet or more and some of 
the 'ore taken out assays $18,000 to the ton in gold and has traces of 
platinum. There are five separate ledges, all of which are said to be rich. 
The owners are now at work on a new tunnel 1300 feet below the first one, 
and it is expected this new bore will strike the ledge lower down. W. B. 
Meek and Frank Jackson are the owners of this group of mines and they 
have been offered $100,000 for the American Flag alone. The offer was 
turned down with the statement that the property is not for sale. There is 
already a fortune in sight for the operators. Mining men appear at Camp- 
tonville frequently nowadays, and the past summer saw more of them in 
the district than for a great many years. Developments are reported at 
many old properties that had long been idle. At the Alaska mine, at Pike 
City, across the county line, a forty-stamp mill is being built, or probably 
is completed by now. ' The mine paid handsome returns years ago, but the 
ledge "pinched out" and many people went broke on the continued at- 
tempts of the company to again pick up the streak of gold. The Campton- 
ville Bank failed as a result of the unsuccessful endeavors to find the ledge. 
N. D. Rideout lost heavily in the undertaking and there were scores of 
others. The outlook now, however, is decidedly encouraging, and tunneling 
is in progress on the ledge, which seems to have been found at last. A 
large number of men are employed and times are good in that vicinity 
once more. — Sacramento Union. 



A box containing 120 pounds of ore, and carrying $7,000 in gold, was 
brought to Grants Pass recently. The gold attracted much attention be- 
cause of coming from a new mine and a new district. It was undoubtedly 
the richest display of quartz ever exhibited here, even surpassing the big 
and glittering pile brought in three years ago from the Briggs claim from 



the fabulous strike on Sucker Creek. But this is superior to that, not 
only in the character of the quartz itself, but through the fact of its coming 
from a well-defined ledge. 

Many of the chunks were half gold, and all so studded with gold as to 
allow whittling the metal with a jack-knife. In some of the pieces the gold 
occurred in flakes or slabs as large as a man's hand. The ore shown is 
but a small part of the fortune taken from a rich strike on the claim in 
Siskiyou County, California, just over the Oregon-California line. The 
property has been under development for the past year, and the owner 
removed over $100,000. 



Mineral developments in California that have been made include tests 
for coal at Thermalito, Butte County, on an old ledge that was discovered 
on the Nash ranch eleven years ago ; the conclusion of the Glendora Mining- 
Company to erect works at Deadman's Flat, in Nevada County, to develop 
one thousand acres of mineral land recently acquired; the construction of 
a new road in Inyo County to connect up the mining camps of Panamiut 
and Death Valley; the sinking of a test shaft on the Kellar mine, near 
Graniteville, Nevada County; "a deal that has been perfected in Siskiyou 
County by a local company for the ownership of the Morning Star group 
of claims' at Jackass Gulch, near Sawyer's Bar; the resumption of work 
on the MeKinley quartz mine on Humbug Creek, Siskiyou County, and a 
large deal under which Los Angeles parties will operate with gold dredges 
on "the Horning place on Butte Creek, one mile south of Centerville, Butte 
County, upon a tract of one hundred and forty acres. 

If a report that reaches here from Plumas is correct, the North Cali- 
fornia Mining Company, at the head of which is H. H. Yard, has one of 
the finest gold-dredging fields in the state at the head of Rush Creek, in 
that county, says the Sacramento Bee. The gravel is said to prospect 
$125 to a cubic yard, and the Company owns three hundred acres there. 



For the two weeks ending December 1 the main shaft of the Murclue 
Gold Mines Company has been sunk a distance of 47 feet, now having 
reached a depth of 79 feet, or within 21 feet of the 800-foot level. The 
work should have been completed to the 800-foot level by the end of this 
week. Drifting on the 600-foot level has continued a distance of 25 feet, or 
a total of 705 feet from the shaft. Five hundred and sixty-eight tons have 
been mined during the past two weeks, 537 of which have been milled with 
the usual good returns. One assay of sulphurets made by the Selby Smelt- 
ing Company gave a result of "Au 5.40 oz., Ag 28.10 oz." Men employed 
as follows: Sinking, 11; drifting, 2; stoping, 4; pumping, 1; hoisting, 4; 
blacksmithing, 2. 



Fortunes in a Few Days 



Have you good Nevada stocks? Have you reaped your share 
of the fortunes that have been made out of the good Nevada stocks 
in the past two weeks? We have had the greatest market here on 
the San Francisco Stock Exchanges ever known in the history of 
the mining business of this city. More shares have been dealt in 
each day than ever before. Some days a million to a million and 
a quarter shares are bought and sold. Stocks have advanced 5 
cents, 10 cents, 50 cents and in some eases as high as $2 per share 
per day. I have had a few customers who have become rich in the 
past few days. I have one old gray-beard that bought 1,000 shares 
of Mohawk about a year ago at 17 cents per share, or $170. I have 
repeatedly offered him by wire the past few days $15,000 spot cash 
for that 1,000 shares of stock. I just received a cable from Korea 
to sell 5,000 shares of Red Top at $4 per share, the market price. 
I sold this man that stock at a few cents a share about two years 
ago. Silver Pick has jumped from 20 cents to above $1.50. Jumbo, 
in the past few days, has gone to above $4 ; dozens of others have 
advanced to prices that have made fortunes for their holders, and 
the market has just started. Why these prices? Because there are 
the most fabulous ore bodies behind these stocks ; the actual bullion 
is coming from the mines and is being converted into gold dollars. 



The boom has just really begun in Goldfield. Bullfrog has never 
had a boom, but the boom lightning is now striking in spots in 
that camp. A few stocks have already advanced 25 cents to 75 
cents a share. 

I know the mines, I know the men who control them, and I 
know the market. I know what to buy and as a result of this 
knowledge I have made for myself and my friends enormous profits 
on good Nevada stocks. 

If you have idle money, put it to work. If you have it in the 
bank, you get about 3 or 4 per cent per year. We always make 
more than that every month, and the past few weeks have made a 
great many times that amount each week. I am a member of two 
Stock Exchanges, and can fill your orders promptly and satisfac- 
torily. During such a market as we have now, don't wait to write 
a letter, for stocks are constantly advancing and the delay oi a 
letter may cause you to pay a high price for your stock. 

As to my reliability, I refer you to the editor of this paper; also 
the Germania National Bank of this city, also the California Safe 
Deposit and Trust Company ; can give a number of other references 
if desired. 



J. E. KERR, Suite 2, 2597 Sutter Street 



Telephone WEST 6454 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



13 



Still the jhtner mine :it Alleghanj 1 linuea to outdo it > own 

grand record. Only ■ few days ago a crushing of fifteen hundred pounds 
ol ore from this producer was made, and the result was all 
bright gold. Just think of it! This i> at the rate of $60 to the pound. 
N'nt li Superintendent Johnson took the mine hack from the San 

Francisco company that hail it bonded, and since thai time be has taken 

• >nt perhaps The great strike still holds a I and the lower tunnel 

i- Im-iih: pushed ahead, which will tap the ledge at n depth of about five 
Immlrt'i! feet. 



Samuel Blight has a number of men at work cleaning out the tunnel of 
the tforambagua mine. Work was started a daj or two ago and is done with 
the idea of allowing mining experts t" examine it for eastern capitalists 
who are interested. The Norarabagua was one of the rich properties in 

the early .lavs in California. It is the opinion of mining men of the dis- 

triet that the Norambagua, it properly developed, would 1" of the 

best properties in the county. 




Three Stamp Mill at Manhattan. 

At the Lvtrzern gravel mine on the line between Nevada anil Sierra 
Counties some fine gravel has been encountered of late. The property was 
sold by the Woolsey brothers and others to an eastern company represented 
by J. M. Walling. The tunnel was extended ahead until it was run under 
the gravel. An upraise has been made for about seventy feet and the 
channel was tapped. The gravel is sprinkled with gold throughout ami some 
coarse gold was taken out a few days ago. 



NEVADA 

Tonopah District. 

One hundred stamps are now dropping at the great mill of the Tonopah 
Mining Company at Miller's Siding. This is the full capacity of the mill, 
which has been under construction for some months past. It is in every 
respect an up-to-date mill, and it is believed that there is nothing on this 
Coast that can compare with it in size or efficiency. 

In the plant are five Huntington mills, and in connection with it are 
thirty-one cyanide tanks. The mill has a capacity of seven hundred and 
fifty tons a clay, and the regret is that there are not ears enough to keep 
the plant going all the while. A fifty-horse-power plant is being put in In 
give 'additional power to the mill, and the zinc boxes have yet to be put in. 

Those who have had the privilege of inspecting the mill declare it to be 
the best on the Coast in the matter of equipment and general working. 
The cyanide plant, is run on the Butters system and it is most complete 
in its appointments. The tanks are immense concerns, and the conveyor 
hell is one of the most astonishing propositions in the whole institution. 
From the leeching tank the liquid is removed and the waste rock is con- 
veyed to the dump by the belt mentioned. A big plug is removed from 
the bottom of the tank and the ore is driven to the center of the tank by 
means of rotaries and dropped on to the belt which carries it in four 
directions before depositing it on the dump. This is regarded as one of the 
cleverest bits of work in connection with the entire plant. 

Of the thirty-one tanks in the cyanide plant, twenty-four are for treat- 
ment and seven are reserve tanks. The plant will permit of treatment of 
ore (hat will go no higher than four dollars a ton. so one can imagine what 
the establishment of mills means to this camp, where there are thousands 
of tons of ore on the dumps which will go easily eight dollars or more a 
ton. 

The poorest paid man in the mill gets four dollars a day for eight 
hours' work, and the wages run from that up to six dollars in the cyanide 
plant. This is pretty fair as against three dollars a day for twelve hours' 
work-. 

Miller's promises to be one of the most important towns in this section 
of Nevada. The Belmont mine is putting up a sixty-stamp mill there, the 
foundation having already been laid. The mill will he ready for opera- 
tion in the early spring. It is rumored, too, thai there is to he put up a 



two-hundred-stamp mill in the near future, and then in addition to this 

the machine simps of the Tonopah Goldfield Bull! rog Railroad Con p 

to he remove. I to Miller's. This will doubtless make of Miller's one of Ilia 
busies! towns in this part of the state. 



Goldfield District. 

Qni lie greatest problems in the Goldfield Hist lict III. past ten .lavs 

or more has been the lack of fuel of every description. \Y I has been 

selling as high BS $50 a cord, and coal equally dear. Tin Id snap has 

added discomfort, and there has heel little Suffering. Bill coal and wood 

in quantities are now arriving daily and there is every reason to venture 
that a plentiful supply will he maintained at nominal prices in (he future. 



Another big mine merger is promised for Goldfield. E. llorlon. princi- 
pal owner of the Daisy mine, has left for the East, where he will pud 
through a deal which will probably embrace the Daisy, Great Bend, Oreat 
Bend Extension, Great Bend Annex, Black Butte Extension, Diamondfield 
Triangle, Vernal, and possibly others. Mr. Harlan says that Mohawk is 
not the only great mine in Goldfield, and that he believes that in the Daisy 
there is a mine of equal richness. It is said that outside of Wingfield Mr. 
Harlan controls the largest acreage in the camp. 



One of the latest promotions in the Diamondfield district is the Amer- 
ican Mining Company. The stock has already been over-subscribed, and 
there is $20,000 in the treasury on which to commence development. 

It is reliably reported that a sensational strike has been made on the 
Jumbo Extension. Seven feet of ore has been struck on the Higginson 
lease, which shows big values and has caused no end of local excitement. 



Seventy business men from San Francisco reached Goldfield Sunday last 
and were entertained at the Montezuma Club for luncheon. A reception 
committee, headed by Geo. Wingfield, met the party and escorted them to 
the Club, where there was speech-making and a warm welcome. The guests 
were subsequently driven about the camp and to some of the chief mines. 
All of them were much impressed by what they saw there, but it is more 
than probable that the greatest impression was made by the brand new 
millionaires they met during the day. A good many men can riot tell a 
good mine from a poor one, but all could appreciate what mines mean when 
riding about the district with men now worth millions who were poor as 
Job before these mines converted them into magnates. 



Four acres of the Mohawk Mining Company's ground is to-day produc- 
ing as much gold as the entire Cripple Creek district. Leasers of Mohawk 
land whose concessions expire the first of the year are working twenty- 
four hours a day that the most possible work may be done on the property 
in the limited period of time. Upon the expiration of these concessions all 
the properties which have for the past twelve or eighteen months been 
worked by leasers will be developed to the very extent of their capacity; 
every property in the Goldfield district will be made to yield the maximum 
of production. It is estimated that the production of the camp of Gold- 
field during the next twelve months will exceed fifty million dollars, or 
three times the entire output of the territory of Alaska. 




Lake of Oil in the Santa Maria District. 

One of the important deals of the week was the purchase by the firm 
of Patrick, Elliott & Camp, of Goldfield, of the Trotter and Pacer el 
in the Diamondfield district. The Trotter alining Company, of Goldfield, 
has been organized for the purpose of developing this property in a 
orous manner. The Trotter acreage is within one-half claim's lengt 
(he Jumbo Extension and the Diamondfield Black Butte: within fifteen 
hundred feet of the Daisy, and but three claim lengths of the Great Bend. 



14 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



ZIEGLER BULLFROG MINES COMPANY 



Treasury Stock Offering at 20 Cents per Share 



The Bullfrog District has long since passed 
the stage of uncertainty. It has been demonstrated 
that Bullfrog is one of the great gold camps of 
Nevada. 



No section of the Bullfrog District has shown 
greater returns from the amount of work done 
than the Crystal Springs vicinity, with its two 
notable mines, the Mayflower and Starlight. 



ZIEGLER BULLFROG 



Situated a short distance north of the Star- 
light and Mayflower Mines is found the well- 
known Ziegler Group, one of the very earliest loca- 
tions in Bullfrog. This group consists of seven 



claims (approximating 140 acres), known as the 
Ziegler, Ziegler No. 1, Ziegler No. 2, Ziegler No. 3, 
Ziegler No. 4, Pearl Hart and Schendel. 



THE BEST INVESTMENT 



You are desirous of making an investment in 
Nevada mining, providing you can know that you 
are really making an investment; if you can know 
that the property in question really has good possi- 
bilities of becoming a great mine, backed up by a 
management that is sincere, with a genuine desire 
to develop a mine, and with no inclination what- 
ever to make one cent from the sale of stock. 

Let me, then, present these facts : Three weeks 
ago I was approached by two of the largest owners 
of the Ziegler Bullfrog Group, with the request 
that I take up the sale of stock in the ZIEGLER 
BULLFROG MINES COMPANY, which was 
being incorporated for the purpose of developing 
these properties. I asked them concerning the 
property and their desires regarding the sale of 
the stock. After a brief description of the ground 
they stated that they desired to sell 200,000 shares 
of Treasury Stock to provide a fund for the devel- 
opment of the mine. They would not agree to the 



sale of one share more than 200,000 at any price, 
and when asked whether or not they expected to 
sell any of their own stock they replied : 

"Not a single share of our stock is for sale. 
We have complete confidence that work will dis- 
close a great mine on the Ziegler Group. We have 
no desire to make a cent out of the sale of this 
stock. We will make our money from the mine 
or not at all." 

I have since seen an iron-clad pooling agree- 
ment signed by all the owners of the original own- 
ership stock, holding the same in trust for six 
months. I personally guarantee that every share 
of this stock which you may purchase will be 
Treasury Stock. 

Of the absolute good faith and sincerity of 
the mangement of the ZIEGLER BULLFROG 
MINES COMPANY there can exist not the 
shadow of a doubt. 



PROPERTY OF POSITIVE MERIT 



A few days later I made a special trip to Bull- 
frog with an excellent mining engineer to examine 
the Ziegler Group. Now, here are the conditions : 

The formation is similar, practically identi- 
cal, with that found on the Mayflower and Star- 
light mines, which are situated about one mile 
south of the Ziegler Bullfrog. 

On the Mayflower mine the surface assays 
ranged from $2.00 to $10.00 per ton, with an occa- 



sional picked sample running as high as $25.00. 
The best four feet of ore did not average above 
$8.00 per ton. At a depth of one hundred feet the 
Mayflower has twenty feet of ore that averages 
from $15.00 to $30.00 per ton, and is recognized 
as one of the choice mines of Bullfrog. The stock, 
which originally sold at 20 cents per share, is in 
great demand to-day at $1.25 per share. 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



E5 



ZIEGLER SHOWING IS BETTER 



Conditions on the Starlight, which lies be- 
tween tin- Mayflower and Ziegler, were similar, 
excepting that the surface values were somewhat 
higher, and the values as depth is acquired are 
correspondingly better. This stock, also offered 
originally at 20 cents, brings $1.00 per share read- 
ily on to-day's market and is steadily advancing. 

The showing on the Ziegler Group is superior 
to that found on either of the above mentioned 
mines. On the Ziegler claim a beautiful vein had 
been opened up ill the annual assessment work. A 
sample taken by in// own engineer across four and 
one-half feet of ore in tin's rein within four feet 
of the surface of the ground, showed gold and silver 
of $18.66 per ton. The development work on this 
claim will start, on ore of excellent milling grade. 

A sample taken by myself from a strong quartz 
vein on the Schendel claim gave values of $18.75 



per ton. Work on this claim can also start in 
good ore. 

We find, therefore, a surface showing on the 
Ziegler Bullfrog property equally as good — yes, 
better — than on neighboring ground with a like 
formation where great mines have been proven to 
exist. 

The above is a mere statement of facts. Draw 
your own conclusions. Do you wish to join an en- 
terprise of this character? Have you a desire to 
assist in the development of a mine? Would you 
enjoy sharing in the profits of a good, clean, legiti- 
mate, successful mining venture ? You can secure 
ZIEGLER BULLFROG Treasury Stock now at 
20 cents per share. How long do you suppose it 
will be before it is worth a dollar per share? I 
sincerely believe that it will command that figure 
within six months. 



STRONG AND CAPABLE MANAGEMENT 



The officers of the ZIEGLER BULLFROG 
MINES are: 
M. J. Monnette, President. 

One of the owners of the famous Hayes-Mon- 
nette Mohawk Lease. 
R. O. Hobson, Vice-President. 

Manager of the Columbia Sampler, and one 
of those responsible for the great success of 
the Bullfrog Gold Bar and the Goldfield 
Great Bend Mines. 
Henri/ M. Grace y, Secretary. 

Pioneer of the Bullfrog District, with eminent 



qualifications of the making of a competent 
Secretary. 

O.O. Kincaid, Treasurer. 

Cashier, John S. Cook's Bank at Rhyolite. 

Ernest Schendel, Manager. 

Locator of the Bullfrog Amethyst, Polaris and 
Ziegler properties. Mr. Schendel has been 
foreman at the Montgomery-Shoshone Mine. 
He will have personal charge of the devel- 
opment of the Ziegler property. 



DIRECTORS 

M. J. Monnette, W. H. Whitmore, B. O. Hobson, H. C. Morris, Ernest Schendel. 



These are the men who control and manage 



Everyone has a reputation that is unspeakable. 
Reference — Any one in Goldfield or Bullfrog. 



the ZIEGLER BULLFROG MINES COM- 
PANY. They are all mine-makers of Nevada. 

CAPITALIZATION 

Capital Stock, $1,250. Treasury Reserve, 500,000 shares. Stock Full Paid and Non-Assessable. 

BUY THIS STOCK AT 20 CENTS PER SHARE 

ZIEGLER BULLFROG MINES COM- Goldfield as soon as the present allotment of Treas- 
PANY stock will be listed in San Francisco and ury Stock has been subscribed. 



Send all orders for stock, remittances, or inquiries for additional information to 

G. S. JOHNSON, 

41-44 Nixon Block, Goldfield, Nevada. Fiscal Agent and Broker, 

My WEEKLY MARKET LETTERS, sent absolutely free upon request, will keep you in touch with 
Southern Nevada, and a stock market that is making thousands rich. Send for them today. 



i6 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



Some excellent surface values have been secured from this property, and 
as the [formation is well denned and not covered by a "wash," develop- 
ment operations can be pushed along intelligent lines without any delay. 
The purchasers contemplate the opening up of this property as rapidly as 
conditions will permit. A shaft is now being sunk to a depth of one hun- 
dred and fifty feet, and .cross-cutting, operations will commence when this 
depth is obtained. The ijinount ihvolyed/'injthe transaction is said to be 
iri the neighborhood of seventy-five thousand dollars. 



. Great interest is felt in the progress of the work of collecting that 
njillion-dollar carload of ore from the Hayes-Monette lease on the Mo- 
hawk, of which so much has bei-n written in the local press. The car will 
contain fifty tons, and in order to figure the $1,000,000 at that rate the ore 
must average $20,000 to the ton. Sacks of high grade are being piled up 
ii' one corner of the big chamber, and a man with a gun is earning $5 for 
a !sliif t of eight hours as watchman. One of these days that ore will be 
taken out from the underground vault and in a few hours it will be in a 
ear ^and speeding oyer the desert to either San Francisco, Salt Lake, or 
Denver, and it will go on express time and with armed guards. In one 
day in Aspen, Colo., in one of the big mines something like $350,000 worth 
of! silver ore was hoisted in twenty-four hours, and that is the world's 
record up to date. The Mohawk ore will be hoisted in a few of the twenty- 
four hours, and the value will be three times greater. Some eight years 
back a carload shipment of a few pounds over twenty-seven tons was made 
frbm ; the Isabelle.mine in Cripple Creek that was worth $219,000. It was 
quartz worth a little over $8000 a ton, or $4 a pound. The cheek in settle- 
ment was photographed and has been used ever since by those interested 
iij advertising the richness of Cripple Creek. That was, and still is, the 
most valuable carload of gold-bearing rock that was ever shipped from any 
mine in the world. But the Goldfield. carload will be worth five times as 
much. 



. Goldfield is' to have a new hotel to replace the one so recently lost by 
fire. : It will be known as "The Nevada," and will have one hundred rooms, 
will be steam heated, electric lighted, and be complete and luxurious in 
all its appointments. The Nevada will be three lofty stories, erected above 
a- high basement that will be : adinirably adapted to ,the_ requirements of a 
hotel. The site is at the corner of Columbia ana Hall Streets, with a ground 
of ninety by one hundred feet. The builders expect to be ready to open 
between the first and fifteenth of January. The cost of the entire structure 
will be not less than $100,000. 



Good progress is being made on the shaft of the Central Tonopah and 
Goldfield Mines Co. on the Bugle group of claims at Goldfield. The work 
is! "being done by contract.. . Present indications are yery favorable to the 
opening up of rich ore bodies at no great depth. 



■ ,! The work of drifting from the two-hundred-foot level of the United 
Tonopah and Goldfield Mines on the Freedom group is progressing favor- 
ably,' .with good results. The ore bodies are increasing, both in extent and 
values. The new gasoline hoist will soon be installed, when sinking will 
be ! resumed. 



Bullfrog District. 

GOLDFIELD, Nevada, December 1, 1906.— One of the best and newest 
mining flotations put out of Goldfield within the past month is that of 
the Keane Wonder Mining Co., of South Bullfrog. This Company owns 
twenty-two claims on the Death Valley slope of Funeral Range, twelve 
miles south of Rhyolite. Six or seven large, well-defined ledges traverse 
the Company's holdings, and values well into the thousands of dollars per 
tori have been obtained from selected samples. 

i One ledge is in the neighborhood of thirty feet in width, and from actual 
mill tests, averages $18.10 per ton in gold. Three tunnels, one above the 
other, have been driven into the hill and this ledge opened up, and $650,000 
of .ore has been blocked out. A new tunnel has just been started from the 
base;of the hill, which will tap the ledge within a short distance and give 
the Company over one thousand feet of backs and millions of dollars' worth 
of ore in sight. 

A twenty-stamp mill, with twelve-hundred-pound rapid-drop stamps, is 
now [under course .$£' .construction' and will be .in operation within ninety 
days. The mill is being furnished by tlie Risdon Iron "Works, "of San Fran- 
cisco, and will be complete in every detail, with facilities for concentration, 
amalgamation, and eyaniding. From tests made,' over ninety per cent of 
the ore will be saved. A Ribhlet aerial tram will carry the ore from mine 
to mill, and within ninety days' time the' Keane Wonder Mining Co. will 
hafeHhe best mine equipment in the state of Nevada, and should be on a 
dividend-paying basis soon after the mill is put in operation. 

The directorate of the Keane Wonder. Co-, consists of some of the 
strongest and ablest mining men in the United States. Among them are 
R. M. Rogers, manager of The Halts Company, of, New York ahd Chicago; 
John Roes, Jr., the noted Pacific Coast mining engineer, who will also be 
consulting engineer of the. property; C. F. Humphrey, the well-known cor- 
poration lawyer, of San Francisco ; Homer Wilson, a California and Nevada 
mining engineer of extensive reputation; Jas. L. Lindsay, cashier of the 
Goldfield branch of the State Bank and Trust Co.; and J. R.Elgan, a large 
mining operator of Colorado and Nevada. 

;The Keane Wonder group of claims was located by one "Jack" Keane, 
a noted character of the desperado type ; .who, until the last few months, 
has deemed it advisable to keep ' ' out of, sight. ' ' Keane struck the southern 



country something over two years ago, with a wild look in his eye -and 'a 
gun at his belt. He made no associates and strictly avoided the public eye. 
An Indian buck was his only companion, and through him he managed to 
keep up a stock of provisions. During his idle moments "Jack" prospected 
the hills in the neighborhood of his retreat, and after several months suc- 
ceeded in finding a ledge that, with a little development, opened into a 
large ore body with a six-inch stringer of vastly rich gold ore. He sent 
the Indian to Ballarat, Cal., with sacks of this ore at various times, which 
netted him a handsome profit. After a year or more had drifted by, 
"Jack" considered it safe, to venture into Ballarat himself, which he did, 
loading himself down with the precious metal. After receiving money for 
his ore he proceeded to "celebrate," with the result that before the even- 
ing was half over he found himself surrounded by four men, who seemed 
intent on making him a prisoner. Before the men could draw "Jack" had 
them covered, and, in the twinkling of an eye the four men each carried 
a bullet from Keane 's gun, and "Jack" had escaped by the back door. He 
reached camp in safety, and has been extremely cautious until the past 
few months. 

Naturally, the news of the rich ore taken to Ballarat became widely 
known, with the result that the present management of the now famous 
"Keane Wonder" succeeded in locating his camp and purchasing the 
property for a good round sum. They had to do business almost at the 
point of a gun, for "Jack" was suspicious even after the large cash pay- 
ment had been made. 

To-day Keane is quietly spending his money somewhere — no one knows 
just where — and the Company is installing heavy machinery for the opera-, 
tion of what will undoubtedly result in one of the largest mines in the 
history of Nevada. The mine was so widely known by reputation that, when 
the stock was placed for sale, the entire allotment was taken up locally 
within forty-eight hours, insuring ample funds to push operations to the 
limit. 



Manhattan District. 

The Georgey group of the Manhattan Nevada Gold Mines Company is 
situated about two and one-half miles west of the postoffice at Manhattan, 
Nye County, Nevada, being one of the best located properties in the district, 
and being one of the largest milling propositions yet opened up in this 
section. In the tunnel, where extensive work is being carried on, the face, 
is now in what will undoubtedly prove to be one of the largest and finest 
ledges uncovered to date. While the ledge is being crosscut at a distance. . 
of twelve feet on the vein, there is apparently no hanging wall, in sight. 
At the present time there are two shafts drifting east and west on this 
ledge in a distance of twenty feet. Assays taken from these points show: 
very encouraging results. Nearer the mouth of the tunnel are two more 
well-defined veins that have been opened up by drifts for a distance of 
more than two hundred feet. Samples taken from these ledges prove be- 
yond a doubt that the Georgey will soon become one of the famous prop- 
erties of the district. 

About six hundred feet west of the tunnel on the Georgey a working 
shaft has been sunk to a depth of eighty feet, where cross-cutting and 
drifting is now in operation. In the northeast drift a body of ore has just 
been encountered that is returning very encouraging values. To the south- , 
west of this shaft another vein has been opened by means of a large open 
cut that shows a well-defined lead that pans gold freely, and samples taken 
give very satisfactory assays, showing considerable hermaxtide and man- 
ganese, decomposed quartz, and other ledge material, proving this to be 
another of the many well-defined ledges that traverse the Georgey group. 
Other smaller veins, but richer, cross-cutting the larger ones, go to prove 
that the Georgey is one of the most promising properties in the great 
Manhattan district. With the water system now being constructed, which 
will give water for all mining and milling purposes, another great factor 
is added in favor of the economical mining and milling of the rich ore 
from this group. 

Experienced mining men at Manhattan and in San Francisco are much 
interested in the progress of the work of tunneling in the Manhattan Mam- 
moth property. Secretary F. P. Jayne, of the Mammoth Company, is at . 
the scene watching the tunnel approach the big ledge, and he writes Presi- 
dent Wm. C. Baker that about fifteen feet more work would bring the men 
to the foot wall. In the last ten or fifteen feet many stringers have been 
cut, showing a formation that is indicative of the nearness to the ledge. 
A new contract has been signed to continue the tunnel one hundred feet 
to cut the full width of the vein and drift one hundred feet in the vein, at 
the option of the Company. Some very interesting developments are ex- 
pected by the Company within the next few days. This tunnel is already 
the longest in the district and it is the intention of the Company to carry 
it entirely through the three quartz ledges which outcrop so srongly on 
the Mammoth Hill. The contractors on the tunnel made nearly one hum- . 
dred feet in thirty days, and if the same speed is made hereafter the tunnel 
will be in nearly six hundred feet and across all the ledges by Christmas. 
The Mammoth Company is pleased by the fact that not one day has been 
lost in the development of the property since the first contract was let in 
April last. 



It having been demonstrated that the big Consolidated Pine Nut ledge 
obtains to great depth, it is but reasonable to expect that the other ledges 
of the camp will do likewise. That the Manhattan Consolidated is one of 
the big mines of the country is now practically assured, and if this be 
true in the case of the Consolidated, it is likewise true in the case of Man- 
hattan Zanzibar, Pine Nut, and many other properties which carry the con- 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



17 



tmimtinn of tb< ilidatod Bssare. One million dollars is a con- 

thc value of the ore in Consolidated gronnd above 

"•-hundred-foot level, some of it being of shipping grade, l>ui the 

r proportion is a high-grade milling product. Five tons of quartz 

fmin the tunnel level, recently sent to Denver for a value test, returned 

1 in ir> » I ■ 1 i" the ton, the Bamples being taken across a 

•t face. It i- believed thai the gold grade «ill be even higher once 

the ledge is well entered at the two-hundred-fool level. 



With the location of high-grade shipping ore in place, the estate of 
the Manhattan Combination Company passes from the preferred prospect 
to the rank of the regular producers, and becomes in facl whal lias 
mo months been predicted, a mine of the ttrsl magnitude. Ai rela 
lively the sanu' stage "i' development the Combination Bhows up equally 
ell as the properties mentioned, with the possible exception of the 
Stray Dog, and it is certain that the huge Black Mammoth ledge, in which 
the high gold valuations on Combination ground are found, is a strong 
rival in point of mineralization with either the famous Consolidated Bssure 
or the no less celebrated Stray Dog-Union No. 9 ledge. The surface show- 
ing on the Combination is one of the very best in the entire camp, and 
compares more than favorably with the gold values seemed on Stray Dog 
ground at grass roots. 



e new copper district at Greenwater, says the Tonopah Miner, the 
trails across Death Valley and the Amargosa Desert havi almost 

congested. Am. .mobiles, stages, burros, mules, . nd bronzed men. 

plodding afoot, have defined the winding highways in thick clouds of dust 

from daw n to twilight. 

The Greenwater of a month ago was :i .•.•imp of a dozen tents. To-day 
it is a thriving town. Xew buildings are join- up as fast as lumber can 
be d. -In. nvd. A census taken on October 20 would have given the popula- 
tion of Greenwater at seventy, yesterday this total reached one 
Not less than a hundred permanent residents pour in everj twentj foui 
hours. The live hundred experienced miners now on the ground wenl 1.. 
work on Hie Clark or Schwab properties an hour alter their arrival. The 
demand for labor far exceeds the present supply. 



Other Districts. 
An assay recently made from ore taken from the Dutchman's Creek 
mine, of Nevada, twelve hundred feet from the old Dutchman mine at the 
Walker Reservation, gave the following results: Gold, 4.84 oz.; silver, 
1.64 oz., or a total value of $104.21 per ton. The mine will be developed 
to ascertain the extent of the strike. 



ARIZONA. 
Special I lorrespondence. 

Phoenix, Ariz.. November 30, 1906. 

The mining exhibit at the annual Territorial fair, held at PI nix, Ariz.. 

November L2tta to liitli. was must Interesting and instructive. An entire 
building was given over to the products of Arizona mines, including all the 
precious metals of the territory, from gold, silver, copper, etc, to the rarer 
substances, such as asbestos and molybdenum; and all |. liases of the ore as 
it. is hammered out by the prospector's pick to the bullions in bars ready 
for the mint. 

It is planned to retain these exhibits in the mining building open to inspec- 
tion the year round, with an experienced man in charge, who will conduct 
a sort of mining bureau where reliable information regarding Arizona' mines 
may be secured. 



Reliable information has been given out by some of the office force of 
the noted copper king and millionaire, Thomas W. Lawson, of Boston, 
which shows conclusively that Lawson and his associates are furnishing 
the capital with which the Auto-Transportation Company is constructing 
an automobile road from Gold Center, on the Las Vegas and Tonopah 
Railroad, to Greenwater, Cal., and that Lawson and his associates have 
acquired a large majority of the capital stock of the Greenwater Red Boy 
and Greenwater Saratoga Copper Mining Companies, whose properties are 
located in the center of the Greenwater copper-mining district adjoining 
i he Schwab Syndicate mines on the east, the John W. Gates properties 
on the north, Bonanza group ou the west, and the Nixon Wingfield Green- 
water mine on the south. 



The world's richest, copper district and the most productive is the region 
comprising southern Arizona and the northern part of the adjoining Mexican 
State, Sonora. 

Of separate States, Montana leads, then Arizona. But adding Cananea, 
Montezuma and other Sonora mines, in the same belt to the Arizona group, 
makes the district rank first, although smaller than the State of Montana, 
with a long and increasing lead over all the world. 



The largest individual producer in the southwestern field is the Copper 
Queen, with over 75,000,000 pounds of copper a vcir, or, approximately, $15,- 
OIIII.IIIH) worth. Cananea follows, With about, 60,000,000 pounds, or $12,000,000. 
United Verde shows 36,000,000 pounds, Arizona Copper Company 32,500,000, 

Old Dominion and United Globe 32,000, ), Detroit Ml, ,000, Shannon 12,- 

500,000, Montezuma (Nacozari) 10,0011,000. The southwestern field produces 
n^ttrly 350,000,(10!) pounds of copper annually, worth nearly $70,000,000. 




anhattan, Nevada 

The World's Wonder Gold Camp 



The Manhattan Nevada Gold Mines Co. owns and operates extensive and valuable 
properties that seern destined to make Manhattan's greatest mines. 

A limited amount of treasury stock in this company is now offered at 

THIRTY CENTS PER SHARE 

Every share of stock is fully protected by our $3,000,000 Trust or Guaranty Fund. 

Under the same management as the Murchie Gold Mines Con., the Empire 
Gold Mines Ltd., the California and New York Oil Co., the California Monarch 
Oil Co., and other famous dividend payers. 

As an absolutely safe and wonderfully profitable investment this stock is unrivaled. 

Write at once for illustrated prospectus and six month's free subscription to the Invest- 
ment Herald. 



A. L. WISNER & CO 

Bankers Fiscal Agents 

80 Wall Street, New York 



i8 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



An enormous bddy of meteoric iron and nickle is the prize sought for by 
the Standard Iron Company, operating in Coconino county, about seven miles 
from Canyon Diablo station, on the Santa Fe. This company is boring into 
Crater Mountain, a low, fiat hill with an immense crater-like cavity in its 
summit, on the theory that this hill was thrown up by the impact of a gigantic 
meteor, which will be found imbedded below the depression that it made. 

Many indications bear out this theory. The crater is fringed with a fine 
sand, white as snow, apparently rock crushed into dust by the terrific impact 
of the falling body, and the surrounding country is strewn with meteoric frag- 
ments. The Indians of this vicinity have legendary records of the fall of an 
enormous body of fire, and their picture writings show that a large meteor 
was seen and noted by their tribe some time in the past. 

The story of how Diego Maldanado acquired his great wealth is one of 
the most romantic known to the mining world. Maldanado now owns the 
fastest yacht in Mexico; it is he who offers to pay off the national debt and 
to build warships for his country. But it is told that he was once a common 
peon, working for a few cents a day in the Sierra Madre Mountains. Every 
moment that Diego could steal away from his master, to whom he owed so 
much that the Mexican debtors' law made him practically a slave, he spent 
prospecting for gold in Setentrione Canyon, nearby. One morning, behind a 
vast growth of cactus, he discovered an old dump pile, and near at hand, 
the entrance to an old mine, walled up with rubble and cement. Again he 
borrowed from his master, and, running away to Culiacan, the capital of Sin- 
aloa, announced his claim, and bought a pick, a hammer and drills. 

Last year an English syndicate offered Maldanado $15,000,000 for bis gold 
mine, but he only laughed — and kept the mine. 



will be continued, as it is known that a second vein will be encountered in 
less than forty feet from the present drift. 



Large numbers of the mining companies organized throughout the United 
States sure now being sent to Arizona for incorporation. There are something 
more than two hundred corporations filed in this territory each month, and 
the great majority of these are sent from other States to take advantage of 
Arizona's very liberal corporation law. The cost of incorporation there is 
very small, and there are no State fees or other charges after the company 
is filed. There is also the slightest possible restriction on corporate activities 
after organization. 



Yuma County. 

The weekly output of the King of Arizona mine, near Yuma, is 125 pounds 
of gold bullion. 

The main shaft of the King of Arizona is now down 1,000 feet, and cross- 
cuts at that depth show a ledge of pay ore 100 feet in width. The ore is first 
run through a stamp mill located on the property, and is then worked by a 
cyanide process. At present the mine is producing a bar of gold bullion weigh- 
ing 125 pounds each week. 

In connection with the mine property, the owners are operating an ice 
plant for the exclusive benefit of the miners employed in and about the mine, 
who number in the neighborhood of 125. 

The King of Arizona is owned by Colonel Epes Randolph, head of the 
Southern Pacific Arizona lines, and Eugene S. Ives. 



The Reliable group of claims, located near Quartzsite, have been 
sold to the Ventura Mining Company, which is a company organized by New 
York capitalists to develop and exploit mining property in Arizona, principally 
in the northern end of Yuma county. The price paid for this property was 
$60,000. It is a gold-bearing property, through which runs a nine-foot ledge. 
In a mill test of 100 tons of ore from this ledge returns to the amount of $12.80 
per ton were obtained. It is considered one of the biggest propositions in this 
part of the territory. 

Development work to the amount of 450 feet has uncovered a large amount 
of rich ore. The new owners plan to begin development work on a big scale 
without delay. They have plenty of funds to carry out their plans. 



Cochise County. 

On November 8th the miners of Cochise county received notice of a raise 
in wages that will amount to a total of half a million dollars per year. 

All miners employed by the mining companies at Bisbee and Tombstone 
received notice of a raise in wages, to date from November 1st. The scale 
has been advanced twenty-five cents per day. Miners now receive $5.75 per 
day and the shaft men $4.25. 

The first motion hoisting engineers receive $5.25 per day. 

This raise comes as a sort of reward of merit to the miners affected, as 
they stood by their employers and voted down a proposed union which was 
being agitated recently. They held many stormy mass meetings over the 
matter, but finally decided that they received the best wages and treatment 
in the country as it was, and that they would let well enough alone. 

Ever since the reopening of the Tombstone mines, the Tombstone Con- 
solidated Company has been working on a big shaft which is now down 
to the 1,000-foot level. This level has been the objective point, as they expect 
to begin the work of opening up the surrounding country from that level. 

For some time there have been indications in a number of the properties 
of the Tombstone Consolidated Company that led the management of the com- 
pany to expect the appearance of copper, several small streaks of copper ore 
being found in the Emerald and in the big shaft; but the most promising in- 
dication that shows that there is copper below the water level in the Tombstone 
district was the body of ore recently struck in the winze in the Silver Thread, 
which has been sunk from the 500-foot level under the direction of Foreman 
Roger Sanders, and which, after being sunk a distance of something over 100 
feet, opened up a body of ore that shows native copper all through it. The 
finding of this body of ore has led many to believe that Tombstone will follow 
in the footsteps of Butte and develop from a silver and gold camp to a 
copper camp. 



Safford. 

The Mascot Mining Company, who some time ago purchased the Dory 
Morris mines on the west slope of the Graham Mountains, has struck a rich 
ledge of ore at the 100-foot level in their Gold Cord mine. The ore encountered 
was in a cross-cut and is about a foot wide, running fully $100 to the ton in 
gold, besides considerable copper. The cross-cut in which this ore was struck 



The Lone Star Consolidated Company, owners of the Lone Star group of 
mines, is erecting a new hoisting engine on the old Lone Star 'shaft and sink 
it on down. While the sinking is going on ore will be taken out of the dif- 
ferent drifts and cross-cuts and shipped. There are large quantities of high- 
grade ore in sight which will be mined while the prospecting is going on. 



Prescott. 

What is believed to be an important strike of ore was made in the Prescott 
mine, on the summit of Thumo Butte and Copper Basin divide recently. The 
claim is developed by another shaft, which has been sunk on the ledge to a 
depth of eighty feet, in which there is also an excellent showing of ore, carry- 
ing good silver values, and from which several tons of shipping ore has been 
mined. 

There are four claims in the group, which is located about six and one-half 
miles west of this city, a good wagon road leading from here to the camp. 
Last Chance mine, near the S. F. P. and P. Railroad, lies two miles to the 
north, while abemt the same distance south, along the summit of the range, 
the Derby and Eldorado mines, both with well-developed ore bodies, are located. 



At the Congress mine a body of sulphide ore was recently uncovered in 
sinking shaft No. 5 below the 2,000-foot level, the size or extent of which has 
not been determined, a cross-cut having been run on it a distance of twenty- 
three feet, with no walls yet in sight. This strike again puts the Congress 
on its feet after being practically abandoned as worked out. It was in the 
past one of the great gold producers of the territory, and has still all the 
equipment of a monster mine. Millions of dollars were taken out of the 
Congress in its prosperous days by F. M. Murphy and his associates. 



SAN FRANCISCO STOCK AND OIL EXCHANGE 



Following are the latest quotations for stocks of oil companies listed on 
the California Stock & Oil Exchange: 
Associated Oil Stk. Tr. Cer.. . 51 54|Monarch of Arizona 08 13 

There is only ONE 

RUBEROID ROOFING 

Standard for 15 Years. Write for Samples and Prices 

BONESTEEL, RICHARDSON & CO. 

473 TO 485 SIXTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



On the 5th of January next we shall issue our usual Special 
Edition of this journal giving a complete resume of the various 
oil fields and mining districts of the West. This special number 
is already well in hand, and our staff of writers are busy pre- 
paring statistics and writing up the various subjects of interest 
for the current year. All should join us in helping to make this 
edition a signal success. Our State stands first in oil production, 
and its mines are world famous. We should take sufficient pride 
to have them, at least occasionally, well represented. 

Advertisers will find our Special Edition an exceptionally 
good medium of reaching the public. We guarantee a circulation 
of at least 10,000 copies for the issue of January 5th. Highly 
illustrated, printed in colors, it will make an excellent souvenir 
edition to send your friends in the East. Extra copies may be 
procured from this office at the usual rate of 10 cents each. 

Advertising space should be procured at as early a date as 
practicable. Rates furnished on application. 

PACIFIC MINING & OIL EEPOETEE, 
1300 Golden Gate Avenue, 

San Francisco. 



CHARLES OREEK: 

General Drafting and Tracing— BLUE PRINTS— Fine Map Work a Specialty. 

2430 Charming Way Berkeley, Cal. 

Telephone Berkeley 461 



Simplest Organization Least Restriction 

No annual or franchise tax or other cost after incorporation ; no state supervision or examina- 
tion of books; no annual statements. 

Capitalization not Limited. Private Property Exempt From Corporate Debts. 

Business may be transacted and meetings held anywhere. Charter secured same day applica- 
tion is made. Nominal sum pays all fees and charges. 
Statement of laws and organization Uanks on request. 



F. W. BENNETT, Attorney-at-Law. 



PHOENIX, ARIZONA 



PACIFIC MIN'INC. .S: OIL RKTORTHR 



i9 



Hi. I A 



■ 1) 

II 

I mi-.nnl 

In.l.-p- I 10 

Junction " 

K.rn 10.00 

Kern ( new 1 10. . 

Linda Visla In 1.". 

M.Kittrick 11:, 



- \- vadit < militv 

City Pet . 



Imont . . . . 

—burtf 

ling 

< rinr 

Thirty-tin- 
Twenty-eight . 

Wal.ash 

Wi'st Shore . . 



Kid. 



Ask.. I. 

4.'. . . 
II" . . 
10 . . 

II.-. 
Ill I. .-.II 
I'll 

.".II . . 
II.-. 11; 

.'in 35 
OS . . 



SAN FRANCISCO STOCK EXCHANGE 
Following are tin- latest quotations of mining sin.ks listed on tin- San 
Francisco Stock A Bxehange Board: 

Alaska. 
Hi. I. Asked. Bid. Asked. 

Wild Goose 1.50 ■-'.'_'•■. 

California. 
Argonaut 4.70|Fornace C Co 



Boston G 1' 2n 

Baswk COM 11.". 

Bunk II M C 1.411 

1 'en Eureka 65 

Death Val 03 

Excel lit C 1.00 

Forest City 



6.00 6.50 
20 .. 
25 27 



Belmont 

Belmont Ex 

Boston Ton 

Brghrs J B Ex 2S 

California 26 

Cask Boy 16 

Eureka Ton 

Golden An 56 

Golden Cwn 21 

Gold Gate 10 

Gold Mtn 06 

Gold Mt Con 02 

Great Westn 05 

Gypsy Qn C 

Home 19 

Indiana Ton 04 

Iowa Ton 09 . . 

.Mm Butler 1.45 1.60 

Jim Btler Ex 17 19 

Little Ton 3.00 



Fnrn Ck Ex 
Greenwr B .1 
Greenwr PC 
Lightner M C 

. . Red Boy 

. . |So Eurek M C 
34 
Nevada. 
Tonopah District. 



MacNamara 

Midway 

Midway Ex . . 
Mizpah Ex . . . 
Monarch P Ex 

Montana 

Mont Mid Ex 
N Y Ton Con 
North Star . . . 

Ohio Ton 

Ohio Ton Ex . 
Paymaster . .. 
Bed Rock Ex . 

Rescue 

Tonopah Ex . 
Ton Home Con 
Ton Lode . . . 
Ton Sil & G .. 
Ton of Nev . . 
West Ton . . . 



. . 4.00 
.. 1.12 
lill 62 

Mill .. 

1.25 . . 

. . 30 

15 



87 89 
2.45 2.50 



37 



15 16 

3.75 . . 

24 25 

25 30 
48 49 

26 28 
.. 12 
113 04 
H4 (16 
28 29 

6 25 6 62 

02 03 

15 .. 

04 .. 
..21.00 

30 40 



Section Six: Oil Co. 



If This Company is composed of practical oil men, and is most 
favorably located on eighty acres of proven land on the now 
famous Section Six, one and a half miles west of Coalinga. The 
land immediately joins the Shreeve Oil Co. and lies directly 
between the Lucile [700 barrels per day] and the K. O. and T. 
Co's well, which is good for from 1,000 to 1,500 barrels per day. 
If The capitalization of the Company is 600,000 shares, 100,000 
of which will be sold for 30c per share for development purposes. 



section six: oil 00. 

530 CITIZENS NATIONAL BANK BUILDING 
LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



SELLING OUT 

Our entire supply of 

Oil Well Supplies 



BELOW COST 



WRITE FOR PRICES. 

W. T. McFIE SUPPLY CO. 

Bakersfield California 



Stock* and Bonds Telephone WKST 6155 

High-grade Securities 
Mines and Mining 



Codes — Western Union 

— Private 
Cable — "Borlini" 



Alfred A. Borlini & Co,, Inc. 

Capital, $100,000 

OUR SPECIALTIES 

High-class Investments In Tonopah, Goldfield, 

Bullfrog, Manhattan, and Adjacent Districts 

We handle None But the Best 

OUR AIM 

PROFITS FOR CLIENTS 

NOW OFFERING 

Shares in the Bullfrog Fortuna Mining Company at 
25 cents per share. Property consists of two claims, the 
Big Chieftain and Pick-up, situated contiguous and ad- 
jacent to the Montgomery Shoshone, Amethyst and Lucky 
Jack properties. In presenting this we are not offering 
a mere prospect, as the company is actively engaged in 
developing the property. Shaft and winz down 75 feet, 
tunnel in 165 feet. Have already uncovered a four-foot 
vein of high-grade ore and two smaller ones of an ex- 
ceedingly rich nature. Forty assays average $43. 

Three railroads will be running into Bullfrog within 
a fortnight. This means cheap transportation and sup- 
plies, as well as increased milling facilities and consequent 
big returns to investors. 

The Bullfrog Fortuna has all the earmarks of be- 
coming a great mine. Property, location, directorate and 
management the best. 

Write to-day for pamphlet and secure your reserva- 
tions at once. 

A. A. BORLINI & CO., Inc. 

Suite 33 Saint Mungo Building, 1300 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco 



Adams 

Aloha 

Atlanta 

Band 

Berkeley . 
Black Ants . 
Blk Butte B . 
Blk Butte Ex 
Black Bock . 
Blue Bell .. .. 
Blue Bell . 
Brooklyn . 
Butte Gold . 

Booth 

COD 

Colorado 

Columbia . . . . 
Colum Mtn . 
Com Frctn . . . 
Commonwh . . 
Conqueror . . . 
Cracker Jk . 

Daisy 

Daisy Ex . . . 
Diani-Bl B C . 

Dixie 

Empire 

Esmeralda . . . 
Exploitatn . . . 

Federal 

Fawn 

Florence . 

Flor Ex 

Francs-Miik . 

Frisco 

Cold B of G . 
Cold Dust . . . 
Goldfld Bel . 
Goldfld Hrld . 
G M of Nev . 
G No Star . . . 
Gld Portland . 
Cold Flat . . . 
G Kewanas . 

G Band 

Great Bend . 
G Bend Anx . 



Goldfield District. 
. 21 22|G Bend Ex 
Highland . 



14 
80 



34 Hibernia 

40 iumbo 

tumbo Ex. . . 

Tuno 

Kendall . ... 

Kendall Ex . 

Kewana Ex . 

Laguna 

Lone Star . . 

Lou Dillon . . 

Lucky Boys . 

Maync 

May Queen . . 

May Qn Ex . 

McMahon . . . 

Mid Pawnee . 

Milltwn M Co 

Mohawk . ... 

Mohawk Ex . 
16 17jNevada Boy . 
2.80 2.90Nev Goldfield . 



. 16 
. 11 
. 12 
. 13 
. 11 
. 22 
. 42 
. 07 
. 17 

1.10 1.15 
. 1.40 1.50 
. .. 10 
.1.15 1.25 
. 1.25 1.27 
. . . 5.00 
. 41 43 
. 27 28 



.15. 



11 
58 
15 

12 



12 

. . . 4.50 

. 25 2 

. 1.00 1.10 

. .. 20 

. . . 1.00 

04 06 

92 1.00 

..25 

2. nil 2. n2 

25 .. 

.. 50 

21 23 

1.65 1.70 

03 .. 

1.15 1.20 

29 30 



Oro 

Palace Gldfld 
Pennsylvania 
Potlach . ... 
Red Hills . . 
Red Lion . 
Red Top . . . 
Red Top Ex , 
Sandstorm . . 
Sandstrni Ex 
Sherman . 
Silver Pick . . 
Sil Pick Ex . 
Sinimerone . . 
Spearhead G . 
Spearhd Frac 
St. Ives . 
Sun Dog . 
Sunnyside . . 
Treasure . 

Verde 

Vernal 

Wonder 

Yel Tiger . . 



31 32 

06 .. 
28 29 

4.00 4.05 

1.70 1.72 

.. 10 

.. 70 

07 08 
.. 27 

1.65 1.70 
36 37 
44 45 
22 .. 
20 21 
.. 40 
.. 15 
10 .. 

16 17 
53 .. 

75 16.00 

. .. 30 

.25 26 

. 35 40 

. 55 57 

. 20 30 

. 05 06 

. 31 33 

. . . 35 

. 15 17 

4.00 4.05 

31 33 

70 73 

12 14 

17 . . 
1.85 1.90 

31 32 
.. 50 
75 .. 
.. 40 
95 LOG 
05 06 



.. 16 

12 15 

02 .. 

28 .1 I 

06 07 

24 .. 



20 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



.Alliance 



Amethyst 
-lig Bfg 



Bullfrog 

Bid. Asked. 

. . . 23 25 

. . . 07 08 

71 

08 

19 



07 



Black Spar 15 

Bonanza Hill 10 

Bonon Mt G 

Bonnie Clare 35 

•Bullfg Annex : 06 

Bfg Banner 56 

B Combinatn 12 

Bfg Consol 04 

Bfg Daisy .... :.'... ........ 62 

Bullfrog Ex . ...' 08 

Bfg Bundle 

Bfg Belmont 15 

Bfg Gold K 48 

Bfg Jumper ' 

B Mg Co Nev 50 

Bfg Nat Bnk 67 

Bfg N. Star ., ........:■ '. 

fifg Sunset 19 



50 
34 



35 



Bfg Victor 37 

Ghina-Nev 10 

Croesus 

Denver Bfg . 

Denv Bfg An 

Den Bush Ex 

Diamnd Bfg 

Eclipse 1.50 

Gold Bar 1.65 1.70 

Gold B An 25 30 

Gold B Ex 10 13 

Gold Dollar 11 

Goldfld Bfg 06 07 

Gold Scepter 63 65 

G Mn Goldfld 10 15 



District. 

Hap Hooligan . 
Homestk Con . . . 

Lige Harris 

Little Bfg 

Mayflwer Ex . . . 

Maryland 

Myflwr Consol . 

Midnight 

Montana Bfg . . . 
Montg Hill M . 

Montgy Mt 

Mont Shos Ex . 
New Orleans . 
New Bfg Mdas . 

Nugget 

Nor Shoshone . . . 

Ohio Blfrg 

Original Blfrg . 
Orig G Bar Ex . 

Pilot 

Rhyolite Town . 
San Francisco . ■ 

Shoshone 

Shos-Bfg Gold . 
Shos Nat Bank . 
Skookum Bfg . . . 

Steinway 

Tramp Cons . . . 
Tramp M Co . 

Trinidad 

Valley View . . . 

Velvet 

Ventura 

Ventura Nev . . . 

Wolverine 

Yankee Girl . . . 



Bid. 



Asked. 

.. 16 
1.45 1.5.0 

03 07 

03 06 

. . 11 

07 .. 
83 86 
.. 20 
15 16 
.. 12 

55 56 
20 22 
06 . . 
60 61 
15 16 

17 ... 
.. 25 
25 26 
.. 22 
.. 24 

08 10 

10 .-. 

.. 10 

09 10 

11 12 
23 25 
38 40 

2.00 2.10 

1.00 . .. 

56 .. 
25 30 
11 13 
13 .. 
.. 13 
03 04 

18 19 



Manhattan District. 



April Fool Ex 
iftl & Pacific . 

Bull Dog 

Comet 

Gold Wedge . . 
tfranny G M . 
Hindocraft . . . 
Indian Camp . 
Jumping Jack 
LHtl'o Grey . 
Man Atlas . . . 
Man Belmont 
Man Belle . . . 
Man Broncho . 
Man Buffalo . 
Man Carson . 
Man Central . 
Man Cons . . . 
Man Con Ex . 
Man Combtn . 
Man Crescnt . 
Man Cowboy . 
Man Diamond 



Alice of Won . . , 
Belmt Johnnie . 
Blfrg .Johnnie . 
Cent Goldleld . 

Congress 

Cyrus Noble . ' . . 
Dmclfld Trngl . 
Eagle 's Nest . . . 

Esperanza 

Fairvw S Kng . 
Fairvw Eagle . 
Fairvw B Bck . 
Flor Leasing . . . 
Giant Hattie . . . 
Globe Johnnie . 
Gold Beed M . . . 
Gold S Peak . . . 
Golden Terra . . . 
Goldyke Beef . 
Gold .Quartz . . . 
GM Tule Can . 

Ida Mines 

Interstate 

Jack Pot 

Johnnie Cons . . . 



04 05 

07 08 
10 .. 

04 06 
25 27 
31 32 
.. 10 

1.02 1.07 

50 51 

74 78 

.'. 15 

06 07 

08 .. 
17 18 
14 15 
.. 15 

05 .. 



Man Dexter 

Man Humboldt 

Man Little Joe 

Man Jumbo 

Man M Nev 

Man Mon Ex 

Man Oro Fino 

Man Bed Top 

Man Standard 

Man Syndicate 

Mineral Hill 

Mustang Man 

Mustang Anx 

Mustang Ex 15 

Original Man 27 

Pine Nut : 38 

Rocky Hill 16 

Seyler Hmphry 17 

Stray Dog 73 

Thanksgiving 07 

Whale 17 

Yellow Horse '. . 10 



1.021.07 
.. 24 
17 18 
23 24 
12 13 
15 .. 
Other Districts. 



30 
17 
25 
55 



15 
18 
48 
45 
03 
60 
1.20 1.30 

35 

40 

55 

50 



46 
43 
02 
59 



10 



15 



16 



85 



24 



Kawich & B . . 
Kawieh Keyst 
Kawich M Co . 

Lida Bell 

Lynx Creek . . 
Mdwy Johnnie . 
ISev Hills . ... 
Nev Hills Ex . . 
Nev Hills Flor 
Nev Tule Gold 
Nev Sunshine . 
N Star Wondr 

Palmetto 

Palm L Strke . 
Phila Johnnie . 
Pitts Johnnie . 
Pitts S Peak . 

Pyramid 

Ramsey 

Roeco Homestk 
Round Mt . . . 
Round Mt Alp 
Bound Mt Ex . 
Ruby Wonder . 
Sierra M & M 



02 



02 

09 

1.75 

08 



;.40 
25 
28 

70 

11 



'20 
35 
36 
74 
35 

10 
2.20 

63 
1.95 



Alpha 

Alta 

Andes 

Belcher 

Best & Belch . . . . : 1 

Bullion 



Comstocks. 



Julia 

Justice . . . 
Lady Wash 
Mexican . . 
Occidental . 
Ophir 



.00 

21 

12 

12 
06 

07 
L.00 

74 
!.90 



10 
12 
35 



1.05 
2.95 



King Keystone Oil Co. 

Lubricating Oils and Greases 

Marine Engine Oils, Boiler Compound, Distillates 

Linseed Oil, Paraffine Wax, Vegetable Oil 

Asphaltum, Animal Oil, Fish Oil 



22 Clay Street 



San Francisco, Cal. 



SEATTLE BRANCH: 
Cor. Pike St. and R. R. Ave. 

REFINERY: West Berkeley, Cal. 



Wm. Wallace 



B. W. Chariesworth 



WALLACE & CHARLESWORTII 




PLUMBERS, TINNERS and 

Galvanized Tank Builders 

Everything in Plumbing, Tin and 
Sheet Iron Work 

Estimate furnished on all kinds 

of work 

Oil Tanks, Bath Tubs, Sinks, 

Wagon Tanks, Toilets, Pumps, 

Water Barrels, Lavatories, 

Wind Mills 



P&B 

Coalinga, Cal. 



Agent of 
ROOFING PAINTS 



CRESCENT BLUE PRINT CO. 

=MINING MAPS= 



BLUE PRINTS TRACING 

612 O'FarRell St. Tel: Franklin 773 San Francisco 

WRITI NG IN SIGHT 

Just Purchased New 

L. C. SMITH & BROS. 

TYPEWRITERS 

Nathan-Dohrman Co. .6 machines Union Trust Bank.. 5 machines 
Cal. Safe Deposit Bank . 5 " Cal. Wine Ass'n ... 6 

Also City and County Bank, & Nevada Bank 
Catalogue Free 

L. & ffl. ALEXANDER & GO. 

1820 Fillmore Street 

Telephone West 62SS 

Branches: — Los Angeles, Portland, Seattle, Spokane, 

Tacoma. 




Ionia I ■ nan IS 1 1 

30 -i is 19 

22,Sai ige l.ln 1.15 

ion 10 12 



PACIFIC MINIM, & OIL REPORTER 



21 



rial 

int . 
Eureka . 

. . . 

<ir. . 

.\ Nore . 

Ki'Dturk 



Bel.lier II II 

1.15 1.2i i 

■_•". 268Uver Hill 

Standard Con 

65 st Louis 

26 Union Con 62 63 

ns 09 

1 1 fellow Jacket B9 90 



,..-„i 



95 



THE OIL MARKET 
American Position 
Following are the latest quotatio mineral "ils al San 

cts. 
n 
12% 



Water White Coal oil. in bulk 10 
al Coal oil 

Pearl Oil, in casi s 

Astral 

Star 

Kxtra star 

Blaine 

ne 

Stove Gasoline, in bulk 

ioline, in cases 

Motor Gasoline, in bulk 






Motor Gasoline, in cases . . . 

No. 1 Engine Distillate, irou 

1 7 barrels or drams 08 

17 No. - Engine Distillate, iron 

17 j oi drums 06% 

ases, 6% more. 

Benzine, in bulk 12>/ 2 

I lenzine, in eases 19 

17% 86-degree Gasoline, in bulk 30 

24 I 86-degree Gasoline, in cases 36 

17%] 



Russian Position 

Daring tiit- past fortnight the quotations on flic Baku market for Crude 
Petroleum and its products have fluctuated considerably. The quotation for 
Petroleum, after having fallen to ^1 copecks per pood, now stands at 
22% copecks per pood; but at present there is no quotation for forward deliv- 
ery. For Residuals the quotation has consistently declined, and has fallen 
during the fortnight 3 copecks per pood to 22% copecks. There is no quota- 
Por forward delivery. The quotation for Kerosene, after falling to 26^ 
Its per pood, has slightly improved, and now stands at 27 copecks per 
pood, for prompt delivery, free on rail Baku. There arc no sellers for forward 
delivery, however. For delivery free on board vessel on the Caspian Sea the 
quotation, after falling to 2G 1 ;. copecks, has been raised to 27 copecks per pood. 
The figures of the production of the Baku Fields for the first fortnight of 
ober, old style, amounted to 20,076,000 poods, and if these are maintained 
the production for the month should show an increase over that for the month 
of September. 

Work is proceeding without interruption on the Fields, and the production, 
as will be seen from the above figures, shows a satisfactory increase; but an- 
other strike may occur at any time, as although the workmen are at present 
quiet there is a good deal of unrest in Baku. 



Indian Market Report 

During the last fortnight there has been a considerable change in the quo- 
tations for Lamp Oils on the Indian markets. In Bombay the price for Bumah 
Oil advanced 4 annas to Rps. 2. 8. 6., whilst in Karachi the price for Bumah 
Oil also advanced 4 annas and the price for Borneo, Sumatra and American 
Oil all advanced 1 anna. In the Calcutta market, however, there was a fall 
in the price of Russian Case Oil, (of which the stock is small, and which has 
been in store for some considerable time) of 3 1 /; annas to Rps. 4. 1. 0., whilst 
there was an increase of 1 anna in the price for Burmah and Borneo Oils. 

The volume of business has considerably increased, and the market re- 
mains firm with a good demand. 

The quotations were as follows: 
Bombay: 

American Case Oil 4. 

Russian Case Oil 4. 

' ' Elephant ' ' Oil in tins 3. 

Sumatra ' ' Rising Sun ' ' in tins 3. 10. 

Borneo Oil in bulk 2. 

Burmah Oil in bulk 2. 

Karachi 

American Case Oil 3. 

Burmah Oil in tins 3. 

Borneo Oil in tins 2. 

Sumatra Oil in bulk 2. 

American Oil in bulk -. 2. 

Calcutta 

American Case Oil 4. 

Russian Case Oil 4. 

Burmah Oil in bulk 2. 

Borneo Oil in bulk 2. 

Sumatra Oil in bulk 3. 

American Oil in bulk 3. 2. 



8. 


Kupees 
0. 


4. 


0. 


10. 


0. 


10. 


0. 


8. 


6. 


8 


6 


14. 


Rupees 
0. 


3. 


0. 


14. 


0. 


14. 


0. 


14. 


0. 


6. 


Rupees 
6. 


1. 


0. 


12. 


6. 


13. 


0. 


o 


0. 


2. 


0. 



English Market Report 

During the past fortnight there has been very little change in the quot- 
ations for Russian and American Lamp Oils in the London and Liverpool mar- 
kets. In the London market the price for both oils fell i/id. per gallon, but 
in Liverpool the prices remaiued unchanged. There is an improvement in the 
deliveries, but this is to be expected during the winter months. The market is 
steady. 

The prices were as follows: 
London: 

Russian Oil, 5%d. ex wharf in barrels. 

American Oil, Gd. (<< 6 '/id. ex. wharf in barrels. 
Liverpool : 

Russian Oil. 5%d: (a) 6d. ex wharf in barrels. 

American Oil, 6d. @ 6%d. ex wharf in barrels. 



PRIVATE ROOflS 



JULES WITTMAN 



Jules' Restaurant 

Only First-Chs*, Restaurant in Burned District 
Formerly 315-323 Pine Street 

Regular Dinner, with Wine, 75 cts. 
Sundays and Holidays, $1 00 

OPEN EVENINGS 

326 BUSH STREET, Bet. Montgomery and Kearny. San Francisco 



GAS OR STEAM POWER 

Either available at your well when your pumping engine 
is equipped with a 

D. C. & I. 

Convertible 




Cylinder 

Manufactured by 



— -.Pi 

J Used in every Oil Field 

in 'J \ i : * J 3 1 ; ; . 

Simple, reliable and easy to start. Can be changed from 

gas to steam and vice versa in five minutes. 

Can be attached at the well to any drilling engine. 

Write for prices and particulars to 

E. R. UHLIN, San Pedro, Cal. 

sole jft.c3-E3iTrr 

PACIFIC COAST 



Cable Address " ROMANIC LONDON " 

LANE S MACANDREW 

26 Great St. Helens, 
London, England 

Oil Merchants and Brokers 

Also 

Brokers for Building, Purchasing, Selling and Chartering 

OIL TANK STEAMERS 



Managers o{ the Following Tank Steamers: 

"LE COQ," "ORIFLAMME," "LUCILINE," "LUX," "TEREK," 

"BALAKANI," "CAUCASIAN," " EUPLECTELA," 

"ROCKL1GHT," "TURBO." "PINNA." 



22 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



EASTERN EXPORTS. 



Following are the exports of mineral oils from the Eastern 
United States for the month of September, 1906: 

Quantities. 
Gallons. 

Crude — 

Baltimore 

Boston and Charlestown 

Delaware 

New York 2,701 

Philadelphia 4,746,909 

Galveston 

Total 4,749,610 

Naphthas — 

Baltimore ' 

Boston and Charlestown 

Delaware 

New York 467,781 

Philadelphia 409,000 

Galveston 

Total 876,781 

Illuminating — 

Baltimore 3,282 

Boston and Charlestown 5,158 

Delaware 

New York 45,411,787 

Philadelphia 29,998,656 

Galveston 972,486 

Total 76,391,369 

Lubricating and paraffin — 

Baltimore 475,477 

Boston and Charlestown 15,144 

Delaware 

New York 6,812,735 

Philadelphia '. 5,230,815 

Galveston 673,141 

Total 13,207,312 

Eesiduum — 

Baltimore 

Boston and Charlestown 

Delaware , 

New York 370,037 

Philadelphia : 1,627,247 

Galveston 906,951 

Total 2,904,235 

Total mineral oils — 

Baltimore 478,759 

Boston and Charlestown . . . : 20,302 

Delaware 

New York 53,065,041 

Philadelphia ' 42,012,627 

Galveston 2,552,578 

Total 98,129,307 



ports of the 

"Values. 
Dollars. 



162 

274,427 

274,589 



59,351 
31,854 



91,205 

329 

574 

3,032,215 

1,608,726 

59,565 

4,701,409 

56,167 
2,859 

890,101 

447,098 

94,258 

1,490,483 



20,139 
47,079 
27,208 

94,426 

56,496 
3,433 

4,001,968 

2,409,184 

181,031 

6,652,112 



RECENT PATENTS. 



The following recently granted patents of interest to the oil and gas trade 
are reported expressly for the Pacific Mining & Oil Reporter by J. M. Nesbit, 
Patent Attorney, Park building, Pittsburgh, Pa., from whom printed copies 
may be procured for 15 cents each: 

Well-drilling machine, Frank E. Simpkins, Akron O.; No. 835,368. 

Fishing tool, J. H. Morrow, Chicago; No. 832,920. 

Strainer for oil and water wells, F. I. Getty Jennings, La. (reissue) : No. 
12,537. 

Eope socket, J. K. Putnam, Montpelier, Ind.; No. 833,548. 
Polish rod stiffing box, Bichard Titus, Bowling Green, Ohio; No. 834,337. 

Method of drilling wells, H. B. Decker, Beaumont, Texas; No. 834,367. 

Well tubing clamp, B. G. Biggs, Kinzua, Pa.; No. 834,537. 

Pipe coupling, A. T. Herrick, Bradford, Pa.; No. 834,618. 

Well-drilling machine, L. K. Bobbins, St. Louis, Mo.; No. 834,642. 

Pump rod clamp, D. W. Stirling, Glade Mills, Pa.; No. 834,688. 

Pull rod coupling, J. C. Miller, Oil City, Pa.; No. 834,836. 

Bod coupling, J. M. Lyon, Eldorado, Texas; No. 835,028. 

Bope clamp, J. H. Winters, Bed Fork, Ind. Ter.; No. 835,090. 




Steel Oil Tanks 

Refineries Erected Complete 

If you want 

Promptness 
Economy 
Durability 

and 

Honest 
Workmanship 

WRITE US 



Established 1872 



Oil Tank erected for O. R. & N. in Oregon 



Win. Graver Tank Works 

East Chicago, Ind. 



Contract 

Drilling deep 
wells for 
Oil or 
Water 
Furnish Com- 
plete Plants 
for Drilling § . 
Prices Eeas 
onable 




Box 237 



W. B. YOULE 



wmmm Wanted 

&ood Second- 
hand Rigs 
1 Oil Well Tools 
OH Well Cas- 
ing and Pipe 
| Engines and 
Boilers 
Fishing Tools 

SAN LUIS 
OBISPO, CAL 



FRESNO COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY 

Incorporated under the laws of California, January 21, 1901 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 

FULLY PAID UP 

SEARCHERS OF RECORDS AND 
CONVEYANCE 



Abstracts of Title carefully compiled at reasonable rates 



:ivo. nifS k st. 



Fresno, Otal. 



A. P. CDflY 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

[WHOLESALE AND RETAIL} 

most Reliable and Complete Stoek of eamp 

supplies and oil men's furnishings 

in Coalinga 

"^Tells IF'strgro cSc Corjn.pstn.-y 
COALINCA, CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC MINING ft OIL REPORTER 



Vol. VIII. No. 4 



San Francisco, Cal., December 20, 1906 



Price, 10 Cents 



CALIFORNIA PROMOTION COMMITTEE HOLDS IMPORTANT MEETING 



'Harbors of California," upon which the Oil Industry Largely Depends, 
the Principal Subject of Discussion. 



The California Promotion Committee hold h most importanl meeting at 
the Hotel del Coronado, Ban Diego, on the loth, instant, at which the para- 
mount subject of the oil industry, "Harbors of California," was ably discussed 
i.v representative men from all parts of the state. It is believed that much 
good i" California in general, and to the <>il industry in particular, will result 
from the meeting. Cheap water transportation in tin' oil business is the road 
to adequate profits therefrom. Already our export trade amounts to several 
millions of barrels per year. The oil industry should lend its support to 
the improvement of the state's harbors. 

An address of welcome was extended by Dr. Edward Grove, president of 
the San Diego Chamber of Commerce. He dwelt upon the great work for 
the benefit of the state that was being done by the California Promotion 
Committee in which the people of San Diego, and, in fact, all parts of Califor- 
nia, are deeply interested. He assured the delegates that the people of San 
Diego welcomed them to their midst and he expressed the wish that the 
hospitality extended won hi be of such a nature that the delegates to the 
meeting would carry away with them the warmest feelings for the beautiful 
city of the .South. And, he added, "If anything is left undone towards your 
comfort, well-being and welcome, the fault lies only in our inability to 

i tain your wishes. " 

William W. Harts, Major, Corps of Engineers, U. S. A., gave a brief 
history of water communications and the progress of ancient nations, noting 
the principles on which this progress was made, and the constant western 
movement of this activity. He showed the unsatisfactory condition of 
communication between the interior of the state and the ocean and suggested 
the development of the harbors as the best means of promoting free commun- 
ication. 

O. H. Miller, Secretary of the Sacramento Valley Development Association, 
in speaking of the harbors of the state in their relation to the interior, said 
in part: 

"The harbors of this state belong to the people of California; they 
are the property of all the people, regardless of where they may live. Like- 
wise are those natural agencies which connect them with the interior com- 
munities, mind you, the property of the people, and we can not even attempt 
to separate them, but they must be considered as joint assets of our state 
and our people." 

Judge Linden L. Boone, of San Diego, spoke on "San Diego Harbor, 1 ' 
and in his talk he dwelt upon the necessity of deepening the channel of the 
bar and told some of the features of the work that was proposed and the 
benefits that would accrue therefrom. What was wanted from both the 
national and state governments was set forth in a logical and convincing 
manner, and made the suggestion that the state take entire charge of the 
Waterfront at the expiration of the present franchises. 

George D. Gray, of San Francisco, representing the lumber industry, in 
Speaking on the subject, "The Harbors of California and their relation to 
the Lumber Industry," said in part: 

"While nature has given California these magnificent harbors it requires 
Our energy and our skill to make them ours in the true sense of the word. 
While it it is true that the commonwealth of the nation and the state of 
California has to a considerable degree availed itself of, and developed, these 
natural advantages, there is much yet to.be done, and it may be interesting 
and encouraging to note what has been done has developed one of California's 
most prominent, industries — the lumber trade. 

C. M. Gidney, Secretary of the Santa Barbara Chamber of Commerce, 
spoke on the subject of Santa Barbara Harbor and in showing its needs and 
advantages said: 

"Between the new government harbor at San Pedro and the roadstead 
of Port Harford, a distance of more than two hundred miles, but one place 
Offers shelter from the northwesterly gales — the roadstead of Santa Barbara. 
So admirably sheltered is this roadstead that only an exactly southeast gale, 
Something that rarely occurs, will create any disturbance therein. To remedy 



this one defect, a breakwater would be necessary to intercept the southeast 

swi-ll during a gale from (hat quarter." 

In discussing "The State ami Its Relation to California Harbors," 
Governor George C. Pardee said in part: 

"In responsibility for the control of harbors and water fronts the State 

government stands in loco parentis to all of the municipalities of California. 

But it cannot be claimed that the State has been cither very prompt or 

very efficient in assuming and discharging its parental responsibilities. It 

was not until 1863 that there was legislation providing a si- heme of control 
for the San Francisco water front, and since then real development has been 
slow in coming. A Hoard of Harbor Commissioners tor Eureka was created 
in 1870 and one for San Diego in ISSih But there the progress of legislation 
for control and improvement of harbors has virtually halted, leaving such 
important harbors as those of San Pedro, Monterey, Oakland and Port Costa, 
besides several others, practically without state control. The whole matter 
looks a good deal like one of the state's neglected duties, and right here there 
is a large field of usefulness for the constructive statesman as well as for 
the engineer. " 

In speaking of the bay of San Francisco, Captain William II. Marston 
said in part: 

"The bay of San Francisco is the most important visible asset that San 
Francisco has. It is of prime importance to the entire state of California. 
In its relation to the world-wide commerce that passes in and out of the 
Golden Gate, the bay of San Francisco will, ultimately, be found to be of 
more value to the United States than are individually the ports of New York, 
Philadelphia or Boston. With the increase of the exporting business with 
the Orient, the importing business will naturally increase. # What harbor on 
the Pacific Coast is so well placed to attend to the calls of a growing com- 
merce as the bay of San Francisco?" 

Dr. Clarence B. Edwards, Chief of Publicity of the California Promotion 
Committee, delivered an illustrated lecture on the subject of "California's 
Harbors." In his lecture he brought out the community of interest of all 
parts of the state saying: 

"Every industry in the state is dependent upon the shipping, and there 
is one attribute of California that is common to the entire commonwealth. 
This is the magnificent harbor facilities which give opportunity to every 
industry in the state to reach the markets of the world. California is 
particularly fortunate in its harbors, and were any of them situated anywhere 
along the parallel coast of the Atlantic it would be so fostered and developed 
by the state to which it belonged that it would attract the commerce of 
the worlcl. " 

George Keunon, the noted author, whose articles on darkest Russia 
attracted world-wide attention, also gave a short talk. 

Following the meeting which lasted until after six o'clock, the banquet 
was held in the large dining-room of the hotel, and two hundred and fifty 
guests sat at the tables and enjoyed one of the dinners for which the hotel 
is famous. 

The resolutions were broad and took up no individual interests, but 
covered solely those matters of general state interest. Resolutions relating 
to good roads, following the report of the committee appointed at the meeting 
of the Committee at Napa last June, were adopted, as were resolu t ions 
of thanks to the San Diego Chamber of Commerce, San Diego citizens, to 
the Hotel del Coronado, and to the Press of California for courtesies extended 
and co-operation in making the meeting a success. 

Following were the resolutions as they were adopted, in full: 

WHEREAS, the Counties Committee of The California Promotion Coin 
mittee, representing the commercial intersts of the entire state of California, 
has discussed fully and comprehensively at this meeting, held iu San Diego, 
December 15th, 1906, the needs of the harbors of California, particularly in 
relation to the duties and opportunities, with respect thereto, of both the 
nation and the state, and 

WHEREAS, California stands at the gateway to the vast commi 
the Orient and the islands of the Pacific Ocean and to her ports comes tin 
commerce of the whole world, and 

WHEREAS, it is notorious that the harbors of California, which are 
among the best in the world so far as natural advantages are concerned, 
are deficient in those improvements necessary for the present, and to 




PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



the requirements of such commerce as may be expected to come in the future 
to our shores, and 

WHEREAS, every port in California is in need of attention and all 
these ports are essential elements in the general prosperity of state and 
nation, and 

WHEREAS, not only adequate deepening and widening of channels and 
waterways but also proper and adequate anchorage and dockage facilities; 
a proper regulation of port demands, pilotage charges, towage expense; and 
cost of water supplies together with a ready opportunity for the interchange 
of freight between docks, are essential in carrying on the business of a port 
to the best advantage, be it 

RESOLVED, that the Congress of the United States be requested to 
appoint at as early a date as practicable a commission of federal engineers 
for the purpose of examining into and reporting at as early a date as possible 
upon the needs of all the harbors of California, and recommending such 
improvements of the harbors of California as properly lie within the province 
of the national government; be it further 

RESOLVED, that the Governor, in consultation with the Chambers of 
Commerce of the various ports demanding improvements, be requested to 
appoint a commission which shall examine into the needs of all the harbors 
of California, investigating port charges, wharfage and dockage demands, 
pilotage fees and towage and water supplies expenses, and reporting at as 
early a date as possible to the Governor, with recommendations for such 
necessary improvements of the harbors of the state in matters within the 
province of the state; be it further 

RESOLVED, that the Counties Committee of The California Promotion 
Committee urgently recommends that the Legislature of the state of California, 
pursuant to such report, enact such legislation as will provide for the regular 
and permanent improvement of the harbors of the state, through a period 
of years, at the expense of the whole state, the sums to be expended to be 
raised either by general taxation or by bond issue as may seem to the Legis- 
lature most expedient and desirable; be it further 

RESOLVED, that the Governor of California be requested to instruct 
the Attorney-General to take immediate proceedings to eject from any harbor 
property of the state all persons or corporations now improperly in possession 
of or occupying such properties. Be it further 

RESOLVED, that the Committee on Harbors of The California Promotion 
Committee be and hereby is instructed to take immediately such steps as 
may be necessary to carry out the provisions of these resolutions. 



STANDARD OIL PROFITS. 



In the petition in equity against the Standard Oil Company of New 
Jersey, filed by the government in the circuit court of St. Louis, November 
15th, it is alleged that the trustees' valuation of all the property and stocks 
placed in their hands in 1882 was $55,710,698.24, and that the additional 
property purchased or acquired by the issue of trust certificates was $13,310,- 
100; so that the total value of all property controlled by the Standard Oil 
Company of New Jersey, except such as may have been purchased from earn- 
ings, is $69,020,798.24, according to its own valuation. That upon this capital 
the Standard has from 1882 to 1895, inclusive, paid $512,940,084.50 of dividend 
and has created a large surplus. 

The Standard has not published any statements since 1896, but from 
1882 to 1896 its surplus, according to its own statements, was $79,536,025.14; 
and it is alleged that its property at the present time exceeds the value of 
$200,000,000. That its annual dividends during the last nine years have run 
from 33 to 48 per cent per annum in addition to this large surplus. 



GOLD AND SILVER OUTPUT FOR 1905. 

The bureau of the mint and geological survey, which are co-operating 
in determining the annual production of gold and silver in the United States, 
have agreed upon the following tabulated statement of the output of state's 
and territories for the calendar year 1905: 

Silver, Pine 
State. Gold Value. Ounces. 

Alaska $14,925,600 129,200 

Arizona 2,691,300 2,605,700 

California 19,197,100 1,082,000 

Colorado 25,701,100 12,942,800 

Maho 1,075,600 8,125,600 

Montana 4,889,300 13,454,700 

Nevada 5,359,100 5,863,500 

Oregon 1,244,900 8,900 

South Dakota 6,913,900 179,000 

Utah 5,140,900 10,359,900 

The most important changes in gold productions are shown by Alaska, 
which advanced from $9,160,500 in 1904 to $14,925,600 in 1905. Colorado 
shows an increase from $24,385,800 in 1904 to $25,701,100 in 1905, due to the 



freedom from labor troubles. Nevada shows a gain from $4,307,800 in 1904 
to $5,359,100 in 1905, and a gain in silver from $2,695,100 to $5,863,500 fine 
ounces. ■ . 

The director of the mint says that Nevada will show for 1906 a much 
larger gain in both gold and silver, and that the state will likely make a 
contest for first place as a producer of the. precious metals. The total output 
of silver is about 1,500,000 ounces under that of the previous year, the three 
heaviest producers, Montana, Colorado and Utah showing a decline. 

The director of the mint has also completed a compilation of gold and 
silver in the world for the calendar year 1905, as follows: 

Silver, Pine 
Ounces. 
56,101,600 
54,652,893 
5,974,875 
619,620 
12,561,600 
204,960 



Country . Gold Value. 

United States $ 88,180,700 

Mexico 15,261,200 

Canada 14,486,800 

Africa 113,329,100 

Australia .' 85,926,500 

Russia 22,291,600 

Total for the world $376,289,200 



157,330,362 



INCREASED CAPITALIZATION. 

The rate at which the country is going in a financial sense is somewhat 
reflected by the increased capitalization of incorporations chartered during 
the present year. The total of these charters issued in the east alone for 
this year is $2,051, 989, 000, compared with $1,694, 187, 211 for the whole of 
1905, and $1,003,542,200 in 1904. Last month the grand total of all the new 
incorporations and increases in capital stock was $378,990,000, of which the 
eastern states contributed in big companies $227,950,000, contrasted with 
only $50,000,000 in November, 1905. The November total is the fourth largest 
this year. 

A significant feature of last month 's list is the unusually large number 
of increases in capital made by industrial concerns, including several of the 
very large companies, and it is understood that other increases are contem- 
plated as soon as the money market becomes favorable. The mining boom 
is still a factor, and railroads are well represented. 

Maine, as usual, heads the list in point of nominal capitalization of the 
companies incorporated under its laws. It is especially attractive to concerns 
of large capitalization, 

Eailroads loom up larger than usual in last month's incorporations. 
Among the chief railroad items are the Brazil Railway Company, with $40,000,- 
000 capital; the Indian Central, with $15,000,000; Hoboken & Manhattan, with 
$38,000,000; Pittsburg, Binghamton & Eastern, with $20,000,000; Arkansas. 
Oklahoma & Northwestern, with $4,000,000. Amongst the notable increases in 
capital are $26,000,000 by the Pullman Palace Car Company; $10,000,000 by 
the American Woolen Company; $20,000,000 by the General Electric Company, 
and several by pipe-line companies, understood to be under the control of 
the Standard Oil Company. Copper mining companies are also well repres- 
ented, though the mining industry, taken as a whole, does not play so con- 
spicuous a part as it has played in several recent months. 

— Journal of Commerce. 



ARROYO GRANDE. 



Arroyo Grande, Gal., December 19th. 
Staff Correspondence. 

Tiber Oil Company's No. 2 has been finished and perforated and shows 
up for a 600-barrel well. The oil is 14 gravity. This well is considered to be 
fully as good as was No. 1, completed some time ago. Rig is up for No. 3, 
and drilling will commence at once. 

Perpetual Oil Company's No. 2 well is 1920 feet in 8-inch pipe drilling 
in black shale. 

Oak Park No. 1 is 2,480 feet deep in 6%-inch pipe, with favorable 
prospects. 

La Grande Oil Company has a derrick up for well No. 1 on the Dutra- 
York lease, about one mile northwest of Arroyo Grande. 

McNee Oil Company has a derrick up for No. 1 well on the Duncan- 
McNee lease, just across the line from Tiber No. 2. Drilling will commence 
within a few days. The Tiber wells have proven the property. 

Associated Oil Company's No. 1 well is progressing favorably with good 
indications for a producer. The location is about two miles northwest of 
the Tiber property. 

California Newlove Oil Company is 1,020 feet in 10-inch pipe on the 
Warner lease and going ahead nicely. 

Crystal Oil Company is making good progress on well No. 1 on the 
Olivera lease north of Arroyo Grande. 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORT! k 



mmencod operation* on tli" Hoason 

Qirnnde, Derrick is op for well 

drilling will commence Boon. Two shallow wells wen drilled upon 

tgo but no depth Attained sufficienl t" reach the 

Oil Company is going ahead with well No. 1 on the Andrews 

twenty milea north of town. A great deal of trouble has been 

experienced in drilling this well bnl the operators feel confident of ultimate 

The Arroyo Grande field is taking on an air of permanency and prosperity, 
and the little town is already commencing to benefit therefrom. Several 
and brick buildings an* being erected, the streets and side- 
walks repaired and other improvements made. The sidewalks are being 

made from asphalt which is taken from a natural deposit on B Bide hill just 

above the town. There seems to l very assurance that this oil field will 

take its place among the great producers of the slate. 



staff Correspondence: 



SANTA MARIA. 



Santa Maria. Cal.. Dec. 18. L906. 



Tin- Santa Maria Realty Company is an organization recently incor- 
porated by Santa Maria capitalists for the purpose of supplying that town 
with natural gas. The gas will lie brought into Santa Maria through a 
four im-h pipe from one of tin- Brookshire wells. A "trap" has already 
been h ad the actual work of laying the pipe will commence within 

a few -lays. The gas will be forced through the pipe by compressors and 
will be used mostly for heating and fuel purposes, the town already being 
Supplied with a complete electric light system. 

Brookshire Oil Company is running two strings of tools, one on new work 
and one deepening X,,. 4 to increase the production. This well was finished 
in the top of the formation account of the great gas pressure at the time 
making it impossible to finish it. The company has about 200,000 barrels of 
oil in storage, practically all the storage oil there is in the field. 

Pinal Oil Company has three strings of tools running on new work and 
derricks up for Xos. 15, 16 and 17. 

Dome Oil Company has two wells producing, one well drilling and is 
building rig for well No. 4. 

The Coast Oil Transport * 'ompnny has completed its pipe line from the 

■ioss veils to the refinery of the California Petroleum Refineries, Limited, 
at <>il Port. The line is 34 miles and has been but 70 days in laying. We 
believe, this is one of the best showings ever made in the laying of a pipe 
line. It is thought that about three weeks will be required to test the line, 
complete the wharf at oil port and to make connections, when the C4raciasa 
Oil Company will be in a position to enter the market with its production. 
special article in New Year's Edition.) 

Graeiosa Oil Company has completed its well No. 8. Derricks are up for 
'.' and 10. Lumber is on the ground for Nos. 11, 12 and 13 and has been ordered 
for five more derricks. Ten strings of tools will be running on this property 
within the next few months. 

Rice Ranch Oil Company is running one string of tools on new work and 
is building derrick No. 4. Two wells are producing about 2000 barrels 
daily. 

The Laguna Land Company, which is said to be composed of Union 
Sugar Company stockholders, is drilling a well on the Suey Ranch, north of 
Santa Maria. 

Pennsylvania Petroleum Co. has its No. 1 well nearly completed. It is 
now in oil and promises to be a big producer. 

The Western Union Oil Company has twenty four productive wells and 
is running three strings of tools on new work. While the capacity of this 
lease is probadiy 15,000 barrels daily, only 5500 barrels is being shipped. The 
Associated takes 2500 barrels of heavy oil and the Standard about 3000 
b.-irrels of light oil. 

The Associated Oil Company is surveying a route for an 8 inch pipe line 
from Careaga to Betteravia which will be about 10 miles shorter than the 
present line between these points. 

Newlove Oil Company is drilling four wells and has derricks up for 
Nos, 5 and 6. The locations are juat across the line from the Graeiosa and 
Western Union Companies. 

The Syndicate Oil Company is running one string of tools on new work. 

Carpentaria Oil Company in which several Santa Maria people are inter- 
ested has reached a depth of over 4000 feet. 

Union Oil Companys operations in the Santa Maria field are as follows: 
I'olsoni tease, 1 drilling; Harlwell lease, 1 drilling; S. M. O. & G. Co., 2 drilling, 
1 new lig; Burcon lease 1 drilling; Keiser lease 1 drilling 1 deepening; Eefson 
Lease, 1 drilling; Hill lease, 2 deepening. 

Associated Oil Company is moving its rig from its abandoned well on the 
Ncwhall lease to No. 1 on the Escolle lease to replace the burned derrick 

I here. 

Well No. 1 of the Claremont Oil Company is 3500 feet deep without par- 
ticularly favorable prospects of oil. 



COALINGA. 



Commercial Petroleum Company has its well No. 1 on Section 12-21-15 
down 575 feet in 10-inch line pipe and is making good progress. 

C. W. Hall of the Michigan Oil & Development Company is in town in the 
interests of his company. He is starting several new companies, their names 
being ;is follows: "White Creek Development Company," "White Creek 
nil & Improvement. Company' 3 and "Michigan Coalinga Oil Company." All 
of these companies are to operate in the White Creek District and will prove 
up a vast amount of territory. 



Tli.' Michigan Oil A Development Company has its u.-n \,.. i dov, 
feel in ft-inch casing. 

The Coalinga Petroleum < ompnny has its well No. 3 .|ow q 

7 -\ inch casing. 

The Inca Oil Company is putting up a rig for well X. 5 and will spud 

in about the lirst of the year. 

Th.- fuiou oil Company i- putting in a battery of two 60-horse power 

boilers to furnish power for ;i pumping Station to pump its ml lo ( »ra Stl 

Its well No. .". is being drilled out and a new string of Hindi casing put. in. 

The Coalinga Pacific Oil company is cleaning ou1 its well No. 1 and will 

have it on its old production again soon. 

The Pittsburg Oil Company shut off the water in its well No. 1 a1 2,945 
feet in 6-inch casing and is earring down I he 4% -inch. II is expected thai 
oil will lie struck soon. 

Tin' Avon Oil Company has its well No. 'A down L195 feel in L0-incb casing. 
The Coalinga Peerless Oil Company is redlining well No. 1 and will 

ii;i\ e it producing again soon. 

The Associated National Thirty Company has its No. :; finished. No. 4 

is down 900 feet in 10-inch casing and the lumber is on the ground for the 

derrick for well No. 5. 

The Associated Oil Company has its Station A in line shape and is painting 
it. It is putting in a. new 75-horso power boiler at its Station One and making 
various other repairs. 

The Manchester Oil Company has its well No. I down 550 feet in Ill-inch 
casing. 

Mr. T. A. O 'Donald of the Octave Oil Company spent a few days in the 
field during the past week. 

Mr. Hill of the Union Oil Company came into field Tuesday for a few days. 

Mr. H. H. Hart, President of the Caribou Oil Company, is spending a few 
days on his property. 

The Stockholders Oil Company has well No. 5 down 800 feet and is 
now making good progress. 




View in the Santa Maria Field. 

General conditions on the California & New York Oil Company's property 
remains practically the same. No. 2 well has been cleaned out and re-tubed 
and is making a good production. Its other wells are doing nicely. 

California Monarch Oil Company lias just brought in a gusher on its 
property on Section 26-19-15, which is producing a large amount of oil. The 
well was finished at 2,815 feet in 6%-inch casing. Settling tanks are being 
erected and will be connected by pipe line with the receiving station at 
once. The oil is very light in gravity and will command a good price. Its 
wells on Section 31 are doing their usual good work and are classed among 
the best in the field. 

The California Diamond Oil Company is enlarging its reservoirs on its 
property at Sunset to provide storage for the increased production. At Coalinga 
its well" No. 5 on Section 12-19-15 is down 1.750 feet in its 10 inch casing. Work 
is being resumed on well No. 1 with the prospect that it will be numbered 
among the producers at an early date. 

The California Oilfields Limited has finished its well No. 35 and has a 
good well. Its No. 34 is in the oil sand and will be brought in soon. 

The M. K. & T. Oil Company has its well No. 2 down 1,300 feet in the 
large easing and is making good progress. 

The Shreeves Oil Company has its well No. 1 down 2. inn feet in 6-inch 
casing and is making the best headway of any drilling in the field. 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



THE JOHNNIE MINING DISTRICT. 

The Johnnie Mining District is in the extreme southern part of Nye 
County, Nevada, and comprises 36 square miles of territory. Nye county 
is over 200 miles long from north to south and probably comprises the 
richest mineralized area in the world within the borders of a single county. 
Tonopah, the county seat, is on the extreme western border line. Diamond- 
field and Goldfield are just over the line in Esmeralda county. Manhattan, 
Round Mountain, Belmont, Kawich, Bullfrog and a score or more camps of 
lesser notoriety are within this county. Geographically, Johnnie is located 



which shipping ore is being taken. It lies between the Johnnie Consolidated 
and the Bullfrog Johnnie. The Belmont Johnnie is another very promising 
property lying on the same formation. The other mines in the district being 
worked are the Boston Johnnie, the Congress and the Leadville Johnnie, the 
latter a very promising silver-lead property on which a large body of 50 per 
cent lead ore has been uncovered. 

The town of Johnnie has experienced quite a growth since the railroad 
was completed six months ago. It has the usual complement of stores, hotels 
and saloons to make up a lively mining town. Some very" substantial busi- 
ness buildings are being erected and before many months the town will 
present a very credible appearance. 

W. M. THOMAS. 




SUGAR AT A CENT A POUND. 

Wonderful Opportunities for Sugar Growing in the Philippines. — Chance to 
Twist Tail of Sugar Trust. — Vast Sugar Districts To Be Opened by New 
Philippine Kailways. — President Roosevelt Advocates Free Trade With 
Philippines. 

By Hamilton Wright. 
There are unusual oportunities for enterprising Americans to raise sugar 
in the Philippines. The subject of Philippine sugar is arousing intense interest 
in the Orient at the present time, owing to the building of the Philippine 
railroads. These Hues will tap some of the richest sugar districts in the world. 
Early last June fifty engineers arivcd in Manila to superintend active con- 
struction on the railroads. These engineers are representing just one of the 
construction companies, other railway men will follow. The bonds of the 
new railorads are guaranteed by the government, which provides that lines 
and equipment shall be first class in every respect, and limits the minimum 
time at which the work of construction shall proceed. It is expected that the 
more important lines will be completed within three years. 



A Gushiug Well — Coalinga. 
most favorably. It is directly in line of the great mineral zone which extends 
from the Comstock south through Arizona and into Mexico. The greatest 
gold, silver and copper mines ever discovered are within this zone. 

The Johnnie District is traversed by the Los Vegas and Tonopah railroad. 
The town of Johnnie is 12 miles south from the nearest station. This station 
is locally known as the Johnnie Siding but for some reason not known to the 
writer, the railroad company saw fit to change it to Amargosa. It is from 
this point that Greenwater, the new copper camp in Inyo county, Cal- 
ifornia is reached. For its age, this station can probably show a larger 
volume of business than any other siding in the United States. The railroad 
company employs three men to check out freight as it is unloaded from cars, 
and oftentimes loaded cars of freight are carried by the "set out" at other 
sidings because there is not room at Johnnie Siding to accomodate them. 
I state these facts to show in a way what is going on in this new desert 
country. The development of the mineral resources of this section of Nevada 
and of that part of California lying east of Death Valley, is simply mar- 
vellous. 

While the Johnnie District has' not figured in any spectacular way in 
the great Nevada boom, the development and advancement of the district 
has nevertheless been highly satisfactory to those most interested. That 
Johnnie has not had a boom such as has characterized Goldfield, Bullfrog, 
Manhattan and Greenwater, is due more to the fact that Johnnie has 
been controlled and dominated by a few capitalists whose interests were 
thought to be conserved by quietly acquiring the best properties for a mere 
pittance. There is a far better surface showing of mineral in Johnnie than 
in any of the other camps named. The richest ore the writer has ever 

seen came from some of the workings in the Johnnie district. Were these 
properties owned and controlled by some of the men whose energy, business 
tact and foresight made these other camps, Johnnie would today be holding 
the center of the stage in the drama of mining speculation that is entrancing 
and holding the financial world in its spell. 

But Johnnie will be heard from in the years to come when the memory 
of some of the boom camps will leave a bad taste in the mouth. The mineral 
is there and capital is being found to develop and mine it. The Johnnie 
Consolidated is pushing development work, while a number of leasers are 
taking out some shipping ore and a great deal of high grade milling ore from 
the holdings of the company. The Bullfrog Johnnie is quietly going along 
developing what in the writer's opinion will some day be one 'of the big 
mines of the desert. The ore is free milling and is found in true fissure 
veins of great strength. The Globe Johnnie is another rich property from 




Lake of Oil — S^nta Maria. 

The Americans who engage in sugar raising here will stand to make great 
fortunes for themselves, help the Philippine Islands, twist the tail of the 
' ' sugar trust ' ' and put the price of sugar so that every family in the United 
States may ultimately have the Simon pure article at a reasonable price and 
children may eat their candy unadulterated by glucose. 

What can be done in sugar raising in the Philippines is shown by the fact 
that the islands have already this year sent over eight thousand pounds of 
crude sugar to the Pacific Coast; they usually export as much from here 
to the Atlantic Coast. 

Think of raising sugar by the most primitive methods known; crushing 
the cane in crude sugar mills that lose fifty per cent of the juice; hauling the 
product one third the way around the earth; paying a tariff of a cent and 
two thirds on every pound that is brought in, and underselling the sugar of 
foreign Cuba which is grown by the most modern methods of cultivation and 



PACIFIC MINING & oil. REPORTER 



highly • «(iii|»|.t-.i Hawaii pays no duty, 

but Philippine - i'Ii Hawaiian sugar thai is 

ipped plantations and factories known to tho 
the Philippines, there is no 
eon n try in the world which can prodtn eheap and profitably :i* the 

i«lni 

Sugar growing in the archipelago affords exceptional opportunities because 

mining market in the world. Our 

mption is st. enormous, almoal m\ billion pounds a year, that wi can 

rb all the sugar which Cuba, Hawaii and tho Baal Cndias can pro 

dnce, [>lus the limited product of our own bee! Bugar factories, and siiii have 

room for all the sugar output "i" the Philippines for many years. 

Our demand for sut;;t r is increasing at the tremendous rate <>t* from 150,000 
tons s year. Nol only are we using more Bugar with our increasing 
population and higher standard of living, but the entire world is rapidly ac- 
quiring a "sweet tooth." The Orient, with its nine hundred million peoples, 
is quickly following the footsteps of the more civilized nations of the globe, 
ami China, with four hundred millions of this nine hundred millions, bakes 
more sugar from the Philippines than the archipelago sen. Is to the United 
States. The Dutch in Java ta i ovei sugar raising, but they cannot 

build factories quirk enough nor establish plantations on a vast enough scale 
with the limited land there available for cultivation to keep up with the 
prodigiously increasing demand of the Orient, It would take years, then fore, 
possibly gem-rations, before the Philippines conld raise enough sugar to seri- 
ously reduce the price of the article in this country. Vet the sugar producing 

capacity of the Philippines is almost without limit. There are thousands and 

thousands of acres of as fine sugar land as any in the world which only need 
the stimulating touch of American capital, American machinery and American 
methods, to contribute their (junta to civilization. 

The enormous profits that are made in sugar raising are illustrated from 
the fact that recently half a dozen Hawaiian sugar planters formed ;i small 
so-called trust, operating at Crockett, California, with a capitalization of 
sixty-six million dollars. Not one of those men could sign his check for one 
thousand dollars twenty five years ago. Vet in Hawaii the cost of irrigation 
and fertilization in order to raise sugar is enormous; while in the Philippines, 

rding to sugar planters here, and the testimony before the Senate and 
House committees in Washington last winter, sugar can be produced in the 
archipelago for less than one cent a pound. It can be prought from Manila 
to the Pacific Coast for $3.50 a ton. It can be transported from Manila to 
New York in steam vessels for 27 to 29 cents a hundred pounds or about the 
same rate as that prevailing between Omaha and Chicago, for instance; the 
rate in sailing vessels even less; yet today the United States is paying from 
sixty-one million dollars to ninety-one million dollars a year to foreigners for 
this commodity while we own millions upon millions of better sugar land than 
is owned by these foreigners with sufficient of as cheap or cheaper tabor than 
these tropic foreign countries possess in sight. 

Sugar grows tremendously in the Philippines. Not long ago in the interior 
of the islands I cut down a stalk of cane that seemed almost like a 
young bamboo tree, measuring it on the ground I found it was twenty nine 
feet high. Most of the commercial sugar raised in the Philippines comes from 
the island of Negros, though a splendid cane is also raised in Cebn, in the 
Cotabato valley of Mindanao and Pampanga and Cagayan valleys of Luzon. 
As there are no ports other than Bacolod, on the west side of Negros, all the 
sugar has to be hauled out of the interior on the backs of ponies or in ox 
carts, and sent to Iloilo in small sailing craft that can come up the coast 
with the tides. With the completion of the railroads great things may be 
expected in sugar development in this region. Both the Cotabato valley of 
Mindanao and the Cagayan valley of Luzon afford water transportation for 
sugar. 

Although there are regions especially adapted to the cultivation of sugar, 
yet the raw sugar cane itself constitutes ;i poptilar sweetmeat throughout the 
islands. The cane grows everywhere. On fete days in the Philippines and 
at cockfights, at weddings and funerals, and in market places, you will see 
peddlers selling the children pieces of raw cane at six for half a cent. It is 
quite a treat to chew and suck one of these dirty pieces of cane; it takes 
lli<' place of candy. Before going to a fete the peddler will go out in his 
back yard and cut a dozen or so stalks of cane with his bolo (big knife). He 
cuts the stalks at their joints so that the pieces are each a foot long; then 
be shaves down the pieces at the rough elbows of the joints. This gives the 
cane an especially nice appearance, and is a reason why one should buy of 
a peddler rather than take the trouble of cutting it. himself. On a joyful 
day in the Philippines you will see hundreds of people ambling along the 
highways from the fete, everyone with a great piece of cane stuck in his 
mouth, just like a dude on Picadilly. 

With the coming of the railroads, and under the quickening touch of 
American enterprise, a new era is at hand for the sugar industry of the Phil- 
ippines. Millions of dollars are going into the islands now. and this influx 
of capital, say planters there, will encourage ami stimulate the siio;,r industry 
to a remarkable degree. If the Philippines can, as they did. export 125,000 



PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY 



BARLOW & HILL 

MAP MAKERS 



Bakcrslield, California. 



A. S. COOPER, C. E., M. E. 

GEOLOGIST AND MINERALOGIST 
2621 Hillegras Avenue Berkeley, California 



CRESCENT BLUE PRINT CO. 

MINING MAPS 
Blue Prints and Tracing 

Tel. Franklin 773. 



612 O'Farrell Street 



San Francisco, Calif ornis 



HENRY C. DEMMING 

MINING ENGINEER 
Geologist Mineralogist and Chemist 
71) wells Located without a "duster'' 



1.V17 North Third .Street. 



Harrisburg, Pa. 



CHARLES GREEN 

DRAFTSMAN 

Genera] Drafting and Tracing— BLUE PRINTS— Fine Map Work a 

Specialty. 
Telephone Berkeley 461 

2430 Uhanning Way Berkeley, California 



CHARLES F. HUMPHREY 

Attorney at Law 

Suite 32 St. Mingo Bldg. 
1300 Golrlen gate Avenue San Francisco, California. 



J. M. NESBIT, Attorney 

PATENTS 

United States and Foreign Trade Marks Registered 

021 Park Building Pittsburg, Pennsylvania 



BANK OF SANTA MARIA 

Capital and Surplus $150,000.00 

Chas. Bradley, President 

B. Pezzoni, Vice-President 

Paul O. Tietzcn, Manager and Cashier 

L. P. Scaroni, Assistant Cashier 

The Pioneer Bank of the Oil Regions 

Solicits the Accounts of Oil Men and Investors 
SANTA MARIA, CALIFORNIA 



WM K. L. MEYER 



CHAS. MARTIN 



]V[EYER 8t CO. 

Inspectors of Petroleum and Its Products 

Gaugers, LUeighens and Tank Measurers 

Licensed by New York Produce Exchange 

K No. i PRODUCE EXCHANGE ANNEX, NEW YORK 
968 BROADWAY, OAKLAND, CAL. 

POINT BREEZE, PENNA. PORT ARTHUR, TEXAS 

CABLE ADDRESS : OCREYEM, N. Y. 

Represented toy C. !F*. BRADY 



8 



PACIFIC MINING & OTL REPORTER 



to 260,000 tons yearly in the years from 1880 to 1898, with crude, almost 
primitive plants and disheartened working people, whose wages were not paid 
in coin as they are now; with only a few thousand acres under native culti- 
vation; at a cost of from sixty-two and a half cents to ninety cents a hundred 
pounds, or less than one-half what it costs in Cuba or Hawaii; without agricul- 
tural implements, and with a loss of forty-five per cent of the sugar in ex- 
tracting the juice from the cane, what may we not expect as to quantity and 
cost of sugar production under modern equipment, labor saving implements, 
American capital, American energy and American executive ability? 

The people of the Philippines are very anxious for free trade. They 
claim that inasmuch as the United States took from them free trade with 
Spain, with which they had a ready market for their sugar, we should now 
give them the same trade privileges as they enjoyed while under Spanish rule. 
They are forty years behind the times in their method of raising sugar. They 
have not the money to buy modern agricultural implements, and only the best 
of their plantations ' are enabled to compete with Cuba, Hawaii and Java. It 
was to help the people of the Philippines as a whole that a bill providing 
free trade was urged by Secretary Taft and President Roosevelt at the last 
session of Congress, where it passed the House hy an enormous majority, but 
was killed by the sugar trust in the Senate. The argument has been made 
by the sugar trust that the granting of free trade for Philippine sugar would 
destroy the sugar industry in the United States. Any one who has actually 
been in the sugar districts in the Philippines and sees how primitively sugar 
is raised will understand how it is that even with free trade it would take 
decades for these poor Filipinos to improve their methods to such an extent 
as to seriously affect the price of sugar in the United States. 

It is interesting to know how sugar is grown in the Philippines. The 
method of plowing is to hitch a earabao to a crooked stick; on the end of 
this crooked stick is an iron point about as large as the palm of one 's two 
hands. The earabao moves very slowly. It seems to reflect as to whether it 
will take the next step or not. The iron point roots up the ground to a depth 
el about three inches. The plow has but one handle and wobbles along in 
the hands of the unskilled native. It generally takes five plowings to render 
the ground fit for cultivation. A man and a earabao can usually plow an acre 
of ground in about three or four weeks. 

The average sugar mill is just as primitive as the method of cultivation. 
This is an odd frame building under a roof of thatched palms and supported 
on posts; usually there are no sides to the building. In the middle of this so- 
called mill are set two rollers or hardwood, one above and one below. Only 
one or two sticks of sugar cane can be put' through a set of rollers at any one 
time. Behind the rollers is a pit into which the juice runs. The juice is dipped 
up from this pit and carried in pails to the kettles. The native sugar manu- 
facturer in the Philippines usually has half a dozen of these kettles, which 
are about the size of the American farmer uses in making soft-soap. Thus 
the sugar is gradually boiled down, and when the mess becomes hardened it 
is wrapped up in bundles made of palm leaves and exported to Hongkong. It 
is a dark, dirty looking package, and when it begins to ferment in the hold 
of a ship everyone wishes to jump overboard. The power that runs this mill 
is usually furnished by a earabao, who walks around the post all day long 
at a snail's pace. 

To reduce the price of sugar in the United States the Filipinos would 
have to send us more than one million five hundred thousand pounds which 
we now import over here from foreign countries. Here is what General 



Leonard Wood, who is intimately acquainted with the cultivation of sugar 
in Cuba, the Philippines, Java and Hawaii, said to me in a carefully considered 
and authentic interview: 

"For the sugar grown here in the Philippines we now have the local 
and China market, of course. The United States produces only about one- 
sixth of the sugar it eats — perhaps one fourth, including the sugar of Hawaii, 
the rest comes from Cuba, Java and the best countries of Europe. The con- 
sumption of sugar in the United States is increasing at the rate of about 150;- 
000 or 200,000 tons a year. An enormous amount would have to be grown here 
to even keep up with the increasing annual demand at home. We grow 
very little sugar out here. If we grew 500,000 tons and sent it all to the 
United States it would not amount to much. The object at home is to pro- 
tect the home industry, but the industry is far from meeting the demand 
there as yet. The United States pay duty on four-fifths of their sugar in 
order to protect one-fifth or one-fourth they grow. ' ' 

In other words, the people of the United States pay more in direct 
tariff on the sugar they import than the entire value of the sugar whieh is 
raised in the United States. A leading Filipino sugar merchant said to me: 
"It is not so much that we want to send our sugar to the United States, but 
we want to send it all through the world where there is a tremendous market, 
but how can we do it without modern machinery and without the stimulation 
to onr industries and the pledge of encouragement such as free trade with the 
United States would give us." 

The amount of sugar we import from the Philippines sinks into insignifi- 
cance before the enormous amount we bring from foreign countries. In 1903 
the United States took about thirty-five thousand tons of low-grade sugar 
from the Philippines and imported from foreign countries over two million 
tons of sugar. This importation was exclusively of Hawaii and Porto Sico, 
which are regarded as United States territories and have free trade with 
the United States. Philippine sugar, in other words, made up about one and 
one-half per cent of the value of the whole country's imports, including imports 
from Hawaii and Porto Rico. In 1904 and 1905 the same relative showing is 
made. The United States is increasing steadily and rapidly in its consump- 
tion of sugar. The sugar producers at home are increasing their output, but 
even their rapidly increasing production is not keeping pace with the increasing 
home demand. Our importation of sugar has doubled in the last twenty years, 
while the population has increased fifty per cent. In the last twenty-five 
years Louisiana has multiplied her sugar yield by three, counting that the 
extra yield given by the last exceptionally favorable season will be kept up. 
The beet sugar industry is really less than fifteen years old and in that time 
has attained a production of about a quarter of a million tons of sugar. In 
the meantime Hawaii and Porto Rico have been added to the United States 
with their production of substantially a half a million tons. In spite of all 
this the United States has multiplied her importation in twenty-five years 
by more than two. Her consumption of sugar has multiplied by three in the 
same period of time. Let this increased consumption go on for another quarter 
of a century and the home beet sugar crop may be multiplied by three; the 
cane sugar crop of Louisiana, Hawaii and Porto Rico may be multiplied by 
three; and still there would be room for the Philippine crop to multiply by 
sixty, and all go to the United States. It is true, we need not expect our 
home consumption to increase three fold in the next quarter of a century; but 
it is extremely reasonable to expect it to double, bringing the total require- 
ment to six million tons. Neither will any one acquainted with the Hawaiian 






GO 



I 



* I 



Carry in Stock a Complete Line of 

OIL COUNTRY TUBULAR GOODS 
DRILLING RIGS and OIL WELL SUPPLIES 






I 



Bakersfield 



Los Angeles 



I 



Santa Maria I 



§ 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



mi. In*. I |m r output in tworttv 

i hundred year*. The land nnd water :ir.' not thori 
ither will I loublc her product in twenty-five 

• ■ up about two-thinl^ ..t" the present don 
■apply. If consumption should double and the pn 
doubli throe million t<-i 

ind per rent more than the Philippines now produ 
Filipino planters would readily take to modern methods it" they could 
• !i free t; ■! they might import modern machinery. In the 

[ilnn tut ion owners who would be glad to soil out 
take an interest in an up-to-date concern with modern machinery, modern 
I and modern methods. Already n number of Bugar men are ex- 
. ]y improving their estates in anticipation of the commercial i 
the Philippines, the beginnings of which an* already beneficially felt. Without 
rade there is a vast market in the Orient, Australia and Europe for Phil- 
ippine sugar. While even today toe United States offers a market, since raw 
sugar can be laid down in New York and San Francisco, duty paid, for less 
than 12.35 per hundred pounds, or less than two-thirds what H costs to raise 
it in foreign C'uha. With the economically certain growth of sugar in the 
Philippines there is bound to follow an enormous demand for American 

machinery, shoes, watches, print g Is and a hundred other articles incidenl 

to an increased earning capacity and an increased standard of living anion-; 
the people of the Philippines. 



Have you seen our 



CALIFORNIA DIAMOND OX 

Casing and Drive Pipe? It's the 
thing for deep wells. Made in fol- 
lowing sizes and weights, and 
carried in stock at all our stores 



SHORT SUPPLY OF GASOLINE. 

The wood and eoal famine of two weeks ago fades into nothingness com- 
pared with the gasolini which now prevails in Goldfield. Gasoline 
i- and for a long time will continue ti> be the motive power of the desert. 

Unfortunately this supply has fallen low*. Gasoline is a commodity thai 
is difficult to procure on the desert at present. Telegrams have been seat 
in Reno, to be forwarded by train where the wires are down. They im- 
portune for a supply ut* the precious fluid. It is believed that there is a 
reserve of gasoline in Reno. If it is promptly forwarded, the auto- 
mobiles will run again and there will be a supply sufficient to operate the 
gasoline hoists until such time as the railroad companies are able to forward 
supply to the camp. 

RECENT PATENTS. 

The following patents recently granted of interest to the oil trade are 
reported expressly for The Pacific Mining i!i Oil Reporter by J. M. Nesbit, 
Patent Attorney, Park Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. from whom printed copies 
may be procured for 15 cents each: 

Temper screw clamp, P. H. Mack, Independence, Kas. ; No. 835,545. 

Pipe pulling device, R. G. Coates, Los Angeles, Cal., assignor to The 
Cyclone Drill Co., of Ohio; No. 836.065. 

Miner's cap attachment, W. N. Brown, Lebanon, 111.; No. 836,481. 

Apparatus for the rectification of petroleum, E. A. Barbel, Paris, Prai ; 

No. 836,732. 

Well drilling machine, Mert McCain, Portland, Ind.; No. S.;ii,>is4. 

Mast for well drilling machines, Mert McCain, Portland, 1ml.; No. 836.985. 

Rope clamp, Madison Spearbeck, Pine Grove, W. Va. ; No. 837,142. 

Piston for pumps, T. H. Gallagher, Carnegie, Pa., assignor the Hough 
Pump Co., Franklin, Pa.; No. 837,266. 

Oil well derrick, Wm. Heckert, Bradner, O.; No. 837,402. 
Method of gas well construction, D. M. Swain, Stillwater, Minn.; No. 837,433. 

Process of deodorizing petroleum distillate, James Armstrong, Baltimore, 
Md. ; No. 837,655. 

Pumping device, J. A. Hellstrom, Pittsburgh, assignor to Hough Pump 
Co., Franklin, Pa.; No. 837,831. 



The Goldfield Eastern Star Mining Company has just purchased the 
Eastern Slope Group of three claims adjoining their Gracey claim at Bullfrog 
and now they have a very substantial holding in the field. This property 
is being actively developed as well as the property at Goldfield now being 
opened up as rapidly as possible, under the management of Mr. Elmer J. 
Chute, the official map maker of the district. 

"Booming" is the way Director George E. Robert of the United States 
Mint described conditions of the mining regions of the west. "The rush of 
people to Nevada is astonishing. This year's production of gold in the 
Nevada field will about double that of last year, ami tin 1907 production 
will double that of 1906. In 1905 Nevada produced about $5,500,000 in gold. 

This calendar year the production will run to $10,000,000 or $11,000, The 

1907 production is likely to go far above $20,000,000. ' ' 



OASIIVO 



Size 


Weight 


Size 


Weight 


55/& inches 


20 lbs. 


q5/8 inches 


33 -bs 


6^ inches 


20 lbs. 


n5/6 inches 


40 lbs 


65/^ inches 


20 lbs. 


12^ inches 


40 lbs 


8^4 inches 


28 lbs. 








joieiVE^ 


F»I1PE^ 






Size 


Weight 






4^2 inches 


15 lbs 





THE NATIONAL SUPPLY COMPANY 

117 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

BRANCH STORES 

Coalinga, Cal. Bakersfield, Cal. Orcutt, Cal. 

TUBULAR BOILERS 



Large Dome 
Dry Steam 
Assured 
Full 
Capacity 




Easy access 

to every 

part for 

Cleaning, 

Examination 

and 

Repairs 



Slock of Boilers from 25 h, p, to BO h, p, on hand For immediate delivery 

Made of best Flange Tested Steel. Tubes of best American manufacture and o 
standard gauge; Rivets of best qualit}' ; Fixtures heavy and durable. Every 
boiler complete, including following fixtures and fittings: Half arch front, com- 
plete with fire and ash 'doors 17x17 inches, with draft dampers; anchor bolts 
for front gates and bearers ; rear arch bars ; cleanout door and frame ; wall, 
plates and rollers ; smoke stack and guy wire ; pop safety valve ; steam gauge 
and syphon ; water column of large capacity, complete with water gauge and 
three gauge cocks ; blow-off cock ; feed valve and check valve with nipples. 

Portable outfits and everything required for drilling or boring 
Test wells. Brass Goods, Fittings and Valves of all descriptions. 



Write for prices 



R. H. HER RON CO,, affiliated with the 

OIL WELL SUPPLY CO. 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

212 North Los Angeles St. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Ill Townsend 8t. 



16 



PACIFIC MINING & 6!L RfiPORTF.8. 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 

The Oil and Mining Authority of the Pacific Coast 



Published Semi-Monthly by 
Pacific Oil Reporter Company 

Incorporated 



EDWARD S. EASTMAN 
MARIA R. WINN 
KARL R. EASTMAN 



Managing Editor 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Field Manager 



OFFICE AND EDITORIAL ROOMS 

Suite 37 Saint Mungo Building, 1300 Golden Gate Avenue 

San Francisco, California 

TELEPHONE WEST 6677 



Subscription price, $2.00 per year, in advance, to any part of the United States, Canada 
or Mexico. Add $1.00 for foreign subscriptions. 

Entered as second-class matter Nov. 5th, 1906, at the Post Office at San Francisco, Cal., 
under an Act of Congress of March 3, 1879. 



COALINGA PRODUCERS DISGUSTED. 

Coalinga oil producers are up in arms at the existing low price of oil 
in that field in comparison to the contract price now being paid for oil 
production of the Kern River Field. The price for the Coalinga product as 
posted in the postoffice at that place is 22 1-2 cents per barrel which is an 
insulting difference of 5 cents per barrel below that being paid for an inferior 
quality of oil. 

According to the terms of the Associated-Independent contract Kern 
River producers will receive 27 1-2 cents per barrel for their entire production 
for the next year. The oil averages about fourteen or fifteen gravity. 
Must Coalinga producers sell a product that averages better than 20 degrees 
gravity for 20 per cent less? If they do it will be because they submit to 
an unreasonable manipulation of the market. 

In the first place the existing conditions in the Coalinga field — adequate 
pipe-line transportation facilities fully warrant a price of at least 25 per 
cent more for the production. From the Kern River field practically every 
barrel must be loaded on cars, and transported to market at an average cost 
of .40 cents per barrel for freight. The Coalinga production is readily trans- 
ported to tide-water at a cost of probably less than 10 cents per barrel. 
The difference in cost of transportation alone should make Coalinga oil a1 
all times worth 30 cents per barrel — a price that this journal claims a reason- 
able profit can be derived from — and we believe we can reasonably say that 
Coalinga oil at 40 cents is cheaper to the marketers than is Kern River oil at 
27 1-2 cents. 

And the marketers require the production. The great , wells of Santa 
Maria, with a possible production sufficient to flood the market, are af- 
fording little satisfaction to those who had thought to gobble up the field. 
Standard Oil Company is getting less than 6000 barrels daily — and will soon 
get still less as some of the contracting companies will refuse to renew their 
contracts with the monopoly, .and the great steel tanks of the company, 
shipped at great cost from Bakersfield, and which it expected to fill with 



22 1-2 cent oil, have never had their bottoms wet. The Standard now finds 
itself with an 8 inch pipe line with a capacity of 25,000 barrels daily, a 
tankage capacity of over 300,000 barjels, and an expensive pumping plant — but 
no oil worth mentioning. Santa Maria producers will stand for 50 cent oil for 
all new contracts. 

Coalinga oil producers need have no fear that the production of the 
Santa Maria field entering into competition with them. Coalinga oil will 
always be worth practically as much as the oil from that great field, and can 
be transported almost as cheaply through existing pipe lines to tide water. 
All that is required is a little pluck, a little more hanging on for a fail- 
price. But, as we have before said, don 't over-step the mark. A fair price 
to both producer and consumer will be best in the long run. 



CHAMBER OF MINES. 



The Los Angeles Chamber of Mines has been incorporated, its by-laws 
and rules of procedure adopted, its objects determined. These latter are 
high minded. Some of them are practical — others hardly so. 

This association proposes to investigate mining properties, to give its 
approval to those that have merit and to withhold it from those that have 
not — thereby facilitating flotations or making them difficult. 

Properties are to be examined at owners' expense, each by two engineers. 
To" quote from the rule governing this matter: 

' ( There shall be two staffs of examining mining experts, one staff con- 
sisting of engineers recommended by Boards of Trade or other official organ- 
izations of various mining districts, the second staff selected from competent 
mining experts by this committee. The names of the members of the last staff 
shall be known only to the officers and directors of this Chamber. .Upon an ap- 
plication for examination of any property, the most competent expert for that 
particular property shall be selected from the second staff above named and 
notified to be at a certain railway station at a certain time, at which time a 
messenger from the Chamber will deliver to him sealed orders together with 
sufficient funds for the trip for both of which he shall receipt, and he shall at 
that time be instructed as to where he shall proceed.' 1 The other engineer, the 
local one, is to be notified at about the same time to make Ms separate ex- 
amination." 

It is then provided that: 

"The examination of the experts and their reports shall cover the fol- 
lowing points: First, the topographical features. Second, character of 
mineral deposit with regard to structure and composition. Third, the extent 
of the workings above and underground. Fourth, the known extent of the 
ore bed. Fifth, the probable cost of labor and fuel and the transportation 
facilities. Sixth, the apparent supply of water and timber and the climatic 
conditions. 

"The experts are expressly forbidden in their reports to show the prob- 
able extent of the ore body, the ore values, either from assay or mill tests, 
whether or not the ore be free-milling, any analysis of the composition of the 
ore, the process most suitable for treating the ore, or any matters of a specul- 
ative or hypothetical character except as above required. " 

The plan as outlined will not work. No engineer of any standing would 
consent to make such an examination, or to give an opinion so restricted. If 
the Chamber of Mines wishes to avoid passing on values, and we believe this 
is a wise course, it should not attempt to send out engineers but inspectors 
to establish merely such points as title, location and the truth of statements 
made by owners as to extent of development work and propinquity to well 
known properties. An engineer's report must deal with values; but is should 
be the part of owners or prospective buyers, or both, to employ engineers. 
The Chamber should leave the question of ore and geology utterly alone, for 
these cannot be divorced from the vital question of values. 

Another rule provides: 

' ' Whenever practicable, Bradstreet 's and Dun J s Commercial Agencies 
shall be consulted with reference to the financial or business standing of the 
directorate or other managing officers. Full statements from said directors 



Hammond 
lion Works 

Warren, Pa, 

U. S. A. 

Builders of 

Steel Tanks 

of the 

Highest 

Grade 




Stills 

Condensors 

Agitators 

General 

Oil Refinery 

Work 



SALES AGENTS 

Herman Meter 

29 Broadway 
New York. 

Krumbhaar&Aiken 

201 Defiegre Building 
New Orleans 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTKR 



ii 



titken with 

i ionrv in mining busii 

■ii for which wo ran sec practical use. Lf this association 

will g iable ami intelligent advice as to the standing of com 

ing to inakt* flotations, anil a* tn the abilities of those in charge 

I will tin Ranch - 

i two weeks ago, the Chambei will appoint 

:i romi trained mining men to go through promotion literature, and 

prospect i and advertisements calculated t«> 
literatnre cannot be mistaken, ii will do valuable service 
•o legitimate operators, to investors and to the industry. 



HIGH-GRADE ORE INTERCEPTED AT RENO. 



Tin- Reno Gasette in ;i late edition says that one of the greatest move 9 to 

put s stop t«> "high grading" over attempted in this state was made when 

Wingfield, representing the Qoldfield Mohawk Mining Company, caus tl 

forty-four sacks of gold ore valued :it $20,000 to be taken from tin- Tonopah 

local, train no. 23, and consigned to the custody of Sheriff Perrel. On the 

arrival of the train Deputy Sheriff Maxwell boarded the baggage car, took 

if the train and held it her*' until the entire forty-four sacks had 

removed and carried u> the Nixon National bank. This ore is supposed 

i part ut' that which lias been stolen from the Bayes-Monette and Francis 

Mohawk Leases in the three robberies that have occurred since October 8th. 

It was consigned by Nelson Brothers, nssnyers, of Goldfield, to Vallejo, 

rnia. 

Early one morning Wingfield noticed that there was :i heavy Bhipmcnl 
of ore being loaded on the baggage car at Goldfield and believing it to be 
of the Mohawk mines, at once telegraphed to P. M, Lee, cashier of the Nixon 
hank, to secure the necessary papers to hold it there. 

Wingfield then took the train as far ;is Sparks and from there was rushed 
to Reno in an automobile, signing the papers and having the officers ready 

eel the local on its arrival. lie secured bonds to protect Sheriff Perrel. 

Every detail of the coup was planned with exactness and caution. 
Deputy Maxwell waited ill the lower end of the yards and as the train pulled 
in boarded the baggage car. 

Messenger B. H. Haffrey made some resistance until he saw that the 
deputy was backed by authority of law. 

As soon as the train stopped :it The depot Maxwell was joined by Sheriff 
Perrel and Deputy Branton and they at once began to unload the stolen ore. 
Securing some hand trucks, the deputies began work, Maxwell loading the 
ore and Branton carting it off to the Nixon National bank until every sack 
had been transferred. 

In all probability the Nelson people will make an effort to secure the 
ore but it is understood that Wingfield will fight every move to take it from 
his possession. 

Wingfield has filed a suit of repleven against Wells Fargo & Co. to 
recover the ore. The complaint alleges that forty-four sacks of ore had 
been wrongfully deposited with Wells Fargo & Co. for shipment, that the 
Wells, Fargo Company was wrongfully detaining this ore valued at $15,000 
to $20,000, and asking for judgment and costs of suit. 

"I think this work has been all done by an organized band of high 
graders," said Mr. Wingfield when interviewed. It is very common talk 
on the streets of Goldfield, even among the newsboys, of high grading that 
goes on. 



"The miners openly boast of what "re they get on Heir shifl 
much p« r pound they get for it. 

••The Mohawk Company has four deputy sheriffs underground C< 
men. A short whili ago Beveral dynamite w< 

pile and exploded just as two of the lessees' watchmen came by. There was 
nobody hurt. This was :ill done to the watchmen, I 

rorkmon don't care to have d who is liable to inl 

With any high grading liny might w:ini to do. 

Some nights ago the strong box in the 150-fool level of the Haj 
Moneiie lease was pried open and aboul fiftei 

Undoubted!) Bomobodj higher than the man thai pounds the drill wai n 

the robbery, The very next night they pried the lock off of the same ho 

but the lessees claim that I here wns DO '<re taken. 

"It is a hard thing to prosecute u high grader in Goldfield. In Pact, I 
think it will be almost impossible. The Mohawk mine is the only mine in 
Qoldfield that is producing high-grade ore for the present time, or has been 
producing high-grade ore for the pasl several months. While Borne of the 
other mines, for instance the Bed Top, Jumbo, the Combination, etc., have 

high grade ore in sight, they are making i fforl to extract it. The Mohawk 

ore is different Ld character from anything else in the camp. The other mines 
mentioned have been taken it* by the big merger, except the Combination, 
which will be taken into the merger a little later. In fact, the merger 
company has made payments aggregating two hundred thousand dollars mi 
the same. So it really doesn't matter where the ore came from, il has been 
stolen from some one of the mines thai are in the big merger. But I am 
sure we will have no difficulty in proving that the ore that has been left in 
Reno was taken from the Mohawk property. 

"There are about thirty-nine so -called assay offices in (odd field and 
from evidence that we have there are about four of them that an- doing 
a good straight, legitimate assaying business, while others are simply living 
off the spoils of the miners. After the miner steals this ore and curries it to 
them they pay him from 20 to 40 per cent of the assay value and double 
Cross him out of the balance." 



The Brown Palace group of claims located in the Rosebud district about 
thirty-five miles from Humboldt has passed into the hands of A. L. Parkhnrst 
and Malcolm L. Macdonald, who have purchased the group outright. The 
above information was given out by Mr. Parkhnrst who has just returned 
from a business trip to the coast and in the northern part of the state. The 
deal was consummated the latter part of last month. The showings are of 
silver and gold and the assays gotten from the workings are reported to 
be fabulously rich. The new owners will begin active development work 
and already a large number of men arc working on the ground. Mr. Mac- 
donald is at the present time in the east. 

It is learned from authentic sources that the report that Schwab was 
interested in this group of claims is not true. 



Sensational strikes are being made on the N. E. arm of the "Golden 
Horse Shoe" at Goldfield carrying out the general idea of experts as to the 
mineralized zone. The Daisy, Great Bend, Fredom, and others, have encount- 
ered highly mineralized ore closely resembling that from the famous Mohawk, 
and there now seems to be every assurance that this part of the field will 
develop some very rich mines. 



Manufacturers of 



Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet Iron 
Works 




Oil Well Casing 
Oil Stills 



OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 

Works: Cor. New Main and Date Streets, Baker Block P. O. Box 231, Station C. Telephone Main 196 

Offiee, 334 floPth JWain Street, lios Angeles, Cal. 



12 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



NEVADA. 



Goldfield, Nevada, December 16th, 1906. 
Special Correspondence. 

Goldfield holds the center of the stage of mining interest at the present 
time, but while the many rich strikes are being made, establishing this camp 
as the greatest producer in the world, the smaller towns are grinding away 
to find another Goldfield, and some of them with very good success. 

Among the .more prominent outside mining camps is Wonder, located 
but a short distance from Fairview. Many rich strikes have been made, and 
every one visiting the camp returns with the tidings that Wonder will surely 
make another Goldfield. 

On the Nevada Wonder, the original strike of the camp, ore is being 
taken that will assay better, than $600 per ton in gold clear across a 12-ft. 
vein. On the 150 feet level of the company shaft, ore is being taken that 
assays $10,000 per ton. Shipping ore of enormous value is being sacked as 
fast as men and money can take it from the ground, and no sorting is done. 
On the Mae Wonder property, lying between the Nevada Wonder and Joe 
Wonder, a large vein has been uncovered, returning values better than 
$200 to the ton in gold. This rich deposit was broken into in doing the 
location work on the property, the vein not being exposed on the surface. 

On the Lucky Joe and Arthur E. claims of the Joe Wonder Mining Com- 
pany, three or four veins have been opened, returning values from $50 to 
$200 per ton, and development work is being pushed with great rapidity. 
The rich vein of the Nevada Wonder trends toward and through this property, 
and the management are hard at work opening up its rich veins. The showings 
to date are exceptionally flattering. 

Again, on the Daisy Wonder, rich values have been disclosed, and in 
fact, no less than thirty properties in the district are in shipping ore. The 
ore is strictly free milling, and some of the finest specimens ever seen in the 
state were taken from the workings at Wonder. 

Some very good strikes in the Manhattan district have caused quite a 
stir in the mining circles at that point. The finding of rich ore on the 200 
foot level of the Manhattan Consolidated, coupled with the strikes on the 
Independence, Paymaster, Giant, Original Manhattan and Manhattan Nevada, 
has started all Manhattan stocks on the upward path, and it is predicted 
that a great boom will strike Manhattan before spring. 



The Manhattan Consolidated has 30 feet of ore that will run better 
than $40.00 per ton, while about two and one-half feet will assay over $300. 

At a distance of 270 feet in the tunnel on the Georgey Group of the 
Manhattan Nevada Gold Mines Company, at Central, a true tissue vein has 
been encountered, which is 14 feet between the walls, and returning values 
better than $10.00. This vein is strong, cutting the formation at right angles, 
and carrying every indication of permanency and depth. It is the intention 
of the management to drift along this vein as well as sink a winze to explore 
the ground and look for a high grade ore body, as the character of the ore 
is identical with that of the Consolidated, and the values are even highei 
than those of the Consolidated when ore was first struck. In addition 
this company is running a crosscut from the bottom of an 80-ft. shaft, and 
the face, is all in ore of a high milling grade. 

East Manhattan is quite excited over an offer of a large amount made 
by an eastern syndicate, for the control of the Toquima Copper Company, 
the Bonanza Copper Company, and the Ealston Valley Gold & Copper Company. 
These three copper companies are forging to the front, and have large bodies 
of high-grade copper ore blocked out. 

Present indications point to another Mohawk in the Goldfield district. 
On the Nighthawk claim, adjoining the Laguna on the north, rich ore has 
been found in quantity. The values have increased within the last ten feet 
of sinking at a tremendous rate. Last week the ore struck in the shaft 
only returned $35.00 per ton. Two days later the assay returns showed 
$162.00. In another two days the values increased to $280.00 per ton, and 
at this writing the shaft is in $400.00 ore, and still it grows richer. The 
character of the ore is identical to the rich sulphides being taken from the 
various leases on the Mohawk, and it is believed the Nighthawk are in the 
same rich deposit. If this is a fact it will greatly stimulate interest on the 
eastern slope of Columbia Mountain, and other companies on the strike of this 
rich lead are preparing to sink deep shafts to encounter the ore body. 

A well-defined vein was uncovered a few days ago on the Bonanza 
claim, about three miles west of town, that proved to be six feet wide, and 
the first assays taken gave an average of $25.00 per ton in gold. The trend 
of the vein is north and south. The finding of ore on this property will add 
a stimulus to mining operations in that section of the district. Several new 
companies have recently been incorporated to work properties in the eastern 
section, and this strike comes as very encouraging news to them. 



Fortunes in a Few Days 



Have you good Nevada stocks? Have you reaped your share 
of the fortunes that have been made out of the good Nevada stocks 
in the past two weeks? We have had the greatest market here on 
the San Francisco Stock Exchanges ever known in the history of 
the mining business of this city. More shares have been dealt in 
each day than ever before. Some days a million to a million and 
a quarter shares are bought and sold. Stocks have advanced 5 
cents, 10 cents, 50 cents and in some cases as high as $2 per share 
per day. I have had a few customers who have become rich in the 
past few days. I have one old gray-beard that bought 1,000 shares 
of Mohawk about a year ago at 17 cents per share, or $170. I have 
repeatedly offered him by wire the past few days $15,000 spot cash 
for that 1,000 shares of stock. I just received a cable from Korea 
to sell 5,000 shares of Red Top at $4 per share, the market price. 
I sold this man that stock at a few cents a share about two years 
ago. Silver Pick has jumped from 20 cents to above $1.50. Jumbo, 
in the past few days, has gone to above $4; dozens of others have 
advanced to prices that have made fortunes for their holders, and 
the market has just started. Why these prices ? Because there are 
the most fabulous ore bodies behind these stocks ; the actual bullion 
is coming from the mines and is being converted into gold dollars. 



The boom has just really begun in Goldfield. Bullfrog has never 
had a boom, but the boom lightning is now striking in spots in 
that camp. A few stocks have already advanced 25 cents to 75 
cents a share. 

I know the mines, I know the men who control them, and I 
know the market. I know what to buy and as a result of this 
knowledge I have made for myself and my friends enormous profits 
on good Nevada stocks. 

If you have idle money, put it to work. If you have it in the 
bank, you get about 3 or 4 per cent per year. We always make 
more than that every month, and the past few weeks have made a 
great many times that amount each week. I am a member of two 
Stock Exchanges, and can fill your orders promptly and satisfac- 
torily. During such a market as we have now, don't wait to write 
a letter, for stocks are constantly advancing and the delay oi a 
letter may cause you to pay a high price for your stock. 

As to my reliability, I refer you to the editor of this paper ; also 
the Germania National Bank of this city, also the California Safe 
Deposit and Trust Company ; can give a number of other references 
if desired. 



J. E. KERR, Suite 2, 2597 Sutter Street 



Telephone WEST 6454 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTKK 



i thr Commonweaith, 
llierlv through tl dAeld Somerset proper! 

into the proper! Hading the town of 

■ l>l. 

hipped from the mines ol 
.. :irnl shipment* were greatly hampered by tin* heavy 
In all probability, tins week's shipment will greatly ■ 

an important factor in the upbuilding of Goldfield. 

hard at work in every direction, and working with success in 

The tremendous profits taken from the Mohawk by teasers 

ntimnlated people in all classes Df business to follow their example, and 

is the district is being literally turn wide open by leasing 

companies and individuals in an endeavor to unearth rich ore bodies similar 

tu ill- i It will be the making of Goldfield. The various properties 

will be thoroughly developed, and the ore bodies, if any, will be laid bare 

a when the lease expires, the companies ean go ahead and systematically 

mini' their ground. 

N.'w thai the railroad is into tin- Bullfrog district, several companies 

win" have been piling rich ore On the dumps, an- preparing fur shipments, 
ami several carloads of rich ere will he taken to the Sail Lake City smelters 
within a few weeks. Generally, Bullfrog is a milling camp, ami several knee 
mills are new being contemplated. Nearly every one in that district is watching 
with eager interest tor the SO-Stamp mill on the Kenne Wonder, in the South 
Bullfrog district, to begin operations. This mill will he the first to crush 
ore in that vicinity, all equipment having I a already shipped. The foun- 
dations are now being laid at the mine, ami the mill will be rushed to com- 
pletion. As this mill will demonstrate the possibilities *of cheaply handling 
the ore of the Bullfrog district, it is natural that others should hold off to 
see the results. However, the Keane Wonder people, before ordering their 
mill, had three or four enrdoads of ore thoroughly tested so as to make no 
mistake in the kind of mill to he installed, and arc satisfied that the company 
will h> grinding out dividends for its stockholders shortly after March 1st. 



Goldfield the record, hut local ambition 

at on 

"The ore on hand in the sale deposit vaults," so says the Trili; 
worth more than - \i the rati ore is taken out it is apparent 

when the lease expires there will he mi ..nil of IIm 

in the safe deposit vaults awaiting shipment. 

"The quantity now on hand is al si\i and llie o 

ge abOOt $18,000 a ton. There will doubtless he more than one cai 
to transport this great fortune, and it is sale to say that Hie train will he 
under a heavy guard. While tins ore was almost ready to ship, it was slated 
definitely that it would not go I" : 1 1 1 \ Denver smelter. Who will handle the 

hie lot is yet a matter of conjecture. 

"When it was staled a short lime hack thai a million dollars' worth of 
me was to he shipped at one lime away from this camp, | pie refused to 

believe it. That that amount would leave iii a single lot seemed utterly 
incredible, but now the news that more than twice that amount will he Bent 

oil' comes as a matter of course.'' 



A strike has been made on the Bed I. ion mine, which lies to Hie east and 

north of Portland. The shall is down only Id:: feet, and from this level there 
has been run two drifts, one toward the Portland and the other in the opposite 

direction. On one of these drifts the strike was made, ore being taken out 
which returned values from sn eents to $111117. The assays ran $6.40, $16.50, 
$48.80, $104.40, $83, $164, tk 1 7.s. a,„l $1207.76. 

Tl vornge for four feet and a half was $48.80. This is a remarkable 

good showing, ami the beauty of it is that the ore is identical with that of 

the Frances-Mohawk lease on the world-famous Mohawk. Tl wners have 

ordered an eighteen horsepower hoist, which I hey export to have installed 
before the first of the year. 



According to a recent report the JIayes-Monnette lease on the Mohawk 
will soon ship a Irainloa.l of ore worth +2,1100,000, instead of $1,000,000, as 
originally planned. The shipment of $1,000,000 in one car would give 



An important strike has been made on the Madonna, situated some two 

miles east of town, and in a locality where up to dale n v has been found 

that would pay to ship. The surface indications are good, and al a depth of 
seventj- two feet the entire bottom of the shaft is in quartz that assays from 
$20 to as high as $32. This ore was broken into after Hie shaft had been 
sunk through rock that would hardly assay a trace. Those In charge of the 
property say that the pay values were found in what is known as the second 




anhattan, Nevada 

The World's Wonder Gold Camp 



The Manhattan Nevada Gold Mines Co. owns and operates extensive and valuable 
properties that seern destined to make Manhattan's greatest mines. 

A limited amount of treasury stock in this company is now offered at 

THIRTY CENTS PER SHARE 

Every share of stock is fully protected by our $3,000,000 Trust or Guaranty Fund. 

Under the same management as the Murchie Gold Mines Con., the Empire 
Gold Mines Ltd., the California and New York Oil Co., the California Monarch 
Oil Co., and other famous dividend payers. 

As an absolutely safe and wonderfully profitable investment this stock is unrivaled. 

Write at once for illustrated prospectus and six month's free subscription to the Invest- 
ment Herald. 



A. L. WISNER & CO 

Bankers Fiscal Agents 

80 Wall Street, New York 



i4 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER. 



flow, and if that is a fact all the surrounding territory is liable to turn out 
to be productive, and all that is required is to go through the capping to 
get into pay values. The property is owned by the Goldfield Madonna Com- 
pany. 



CALIFORNIA 

Superintendent Jerry Curtis was in San Francisco from the Empire 
Gold Mines, Ltd., at Goid Valley last week to have some rush repairs made 
on some electrical fittings for the power house. Mr. Curtis states that the 
Empire plant has never been in such a thoroughly efficient condition as at 
the present time. The work of reconstructing the mill has been completed 
and it is in excellent shape for a continued big output. The weight and 
capacity of the twenty-five stamps has been added to materially, its present 
capacity being about 100 tons per day. New floors, new timbers, etc., all 
lend a neat, substantial appearance to the buildings which are now in snug 
condition for a long run. 

During the temporary shut-down for repairs several thousand tons of ore 
has been mined. With a very small force of men the mill can now be kept 
running continuously for many years. 

The uplift from the upper tunnel has been extended a distance of about 
45 feet, and exceptionally good ore carrying much free gold has been en- 
countered. Work at this point will be extended vigorously. The Empire has 
about 800 feet of backs above the mill to the crest of the hill, all of which 
promises to yield rich values. The vein which is from three to six feet at 
the outcrop, and carries much free gold, can be traced clear across the com- 
pany's holdings, a distance of nearly 800 feet. The outlook for the Empire 
is exceptionally promising. 

For the two weeks ended December 15th, the shaft of the Murchie Gold 
Mines Consolidated was continued a distance of 14 feet, or to a total depth 
of 93 feet, through to the 800-feet and the station put at that level. The 
shaft is now completed and the cage running. The work of extracting the 
rich ore from this depth has commenced. The work of continuing the shaft 
downward will be pushed vigorously. There is every reason to believe that 
by mid-summer it will have reached the 1,200-foot level. For the two weeks 
ended as above 479 tons of ore was mined at the Murchie, 407 tons of which 
was milled with the usual good results. 

Twenty-six feet of work was accomplished in the west 600-foot drift, 
carrying the same to a total of 731 feet from the shaft. This drift is continu- 
ing to show exceptionally good values. 

H. C. Hibbard, the secretary of the California Gold and Copper Company, 
has returned from a five days' visit to the mines of the company, located near 
Vontrigger station on the Barnwell branch of the Santa Fe Railway. 

He reports everything in fine condition at the mine. The main shaft 
is now down two hundred and twenty feet and in a high grade of sulphide 
ore. At the one hundred-foot level there are over two hundred feet of drift 
and cross cut, and at the two hundred-foot level two hundred and thirty feet 
of drift. There are two other shafts, one of one hundred, and one of one 
hundred and fifty feet in depth, besides numerous cuts on the several claims, 
and all these shaft drifts and cuts are in good ore throughout their entire 
length and depth. 

The company has nine claims upon every one of which good ore has been 
found. A mill site of five acres has been located and a well is being dug 
thereon to get water to operate a plant for the reduction of the ore. 

A survey of the property has been made by a United States ' surveyor, 
and a patent will be obtained for the property very soon. 

A gasoline engine, hoist, air compressor and drills driven by compressed 
air have been installed at the main shaft and are in operation day and night. 

From sixteen to twenty men are employed by the company and from 
six to twelve tons of rich ore are being piled on the dump each day. 

There are several thousand tons of ore on the dump and shipments of 
paying ore can be made at any time when it is deemed best. 

NEW COMPANY IN GREENWATER. 

Goldfield, Nev., Dec. 16, 1906. 

Right on top of the story of the descent of Tom Lawson, the famous 
copper king, into the Greenwater comes another very interesting bit of news. 
Lawson bought the Saratoga and Red Boy mines in the famous district, and 
when Lawson buys copper territory, he is credited with knowing what he is 
doing. Presumably he has selected some choice property in Greenwater, but 
now comes a number of capitalists, principally out of the west, with eleven 
claims which lie between the Saratoga and the Red Boy. 

The syndicate that bought these claims is headed by C. F. Humphrey and 
H. J. Ralston of San Francisco, and they have money enough with them and 
behind them to work their properties without selling out to the Boston mil- 
lionaire. As a matter of fact they have already commenced the work of 
development and are going ahead with it as fast as the weather and other 
conditions will permit. 

The property has been incorporated under the name of the Greenwater 
Bonanza Company, with the following strong directorate: 

President, H. J. Ralston, President of the Ralston Iron Works, the big 
steel construction firm of San Francisco, and- who is also heavily interested 
in some good paying California copper mines. 

Vice-President, E. II. Mead of the well known Caracia Consolidated Cop- 
per Company of Utah. 

Treasurer, T. F. Bonneau, who recently consolidated his Black Jack cop- 
per claims at Greenwater with the Schwab interests. 

Secretary, George H. Bush, Attorney for C. W. Clark, manager of the 
United Verdi mines of Arizona. 

Directors: John J. Meyers and C. F. Humphrey, owners of the Marchie 
and Empire mines near Nevada City, Cal. 

The Bonanza group adjoins the Pay Copper, lying about half a mile from 
the town of Greenwater, and is in the same mineral belt as the Schwab, 
MacDonald, Brock and Gillies properties. 

The coming year promises to see lively times in Greenwater for the Schwab 
interests have declared that they will concentrate all their forces in Death 
Valley and rush the work of development and will get to working the ore as 
fast as possible. They are now figuring on putting in a smelter p.|i soon as 
possible, both Gillies and Macdonald being in New York with Schwab at the 
present time. 



GOLDFIELD 



BULLFROG 



$100 for ^lO. 

We own, absolutely free of indebtedness, six claims in the great 
BULLFROG district and three full claims in the rich GOLDFIELD 
district. Properties in both sections being developed with all possible 
speed, under the direction of high-class mining engineers. The cross- 
cut at the 50-foot level on the Bullfrog property, is now in 65 feet and 
and the showing is excellent. This property in the trend of the great 
Shoshone Mine. The shaft on the Mae claim at Goldfield is down 60 
feet and will be run down as rapidly as conditions will permit. Every 
assay shows rich in gold. 

We offer for a few days all or any part of 50,000 shares of our 
Treasury stock, at TEN CENTS per share, in blocks of not less than 
100 shares. The price of stock is far too low, considering the oppor- 
tunities for a rich strike and rapid advance. 

Highest Bullfrog, Goldfield and Eastern references furnished if 
desired. Send in your subscription at once. Write for prospectus, 
maps, etc. [We reserve the right to withdraw the stock without 
notice.] 

GOLDFIELD EASTERN STAR MINING COMPANY 



' ANACOSTIA' 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Are You On Tlxis Map? 



Under the direction of our field corps we have prepared 
a correct and up-to-date map of Nevada and the California 
border, showing the location of all the latest mining dis- 
coveries, and the only map to show Greenwater, Wonder, 
Fairview, Ramsey, Comstock, Ely, Yerington and dozens 
of other recently discovered mining districts which are to- 
day making history and records in the production of the 
precious metals, and are destined to rival the great Com- 
stock. 

No one interested in Southern Nevada or the mining 
industry can afford to be without this map, and as an 
introduction we have decided to distribute 35,000 free on 
request. Only one copy will be mailed to each person; 
additional copies, |i each, and after our supply set aside 
for free distribution is exhausted, the price will be $1, and 
will be on sale at all news stands. 

Write for the map today. Address, 

ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT, 

D. MACKENZIE & CO., Inc. 

Holders of the world's record for rapid mine-making 
and dividend-paying, Goldfield, Nevada. 



HAVE YOU SEEN OUR 

NEW MAP 

OF 

Santa Maria and Arroyo Grande 
Oil Fields? 

It is the only reliable map of these districts ever pub- 
lished. Shows the Ocean Front from Gaviota to Port 
Harford, Refinery Sites, Piers, Pipe Lines, Location 
of Wells, Etc., Etc. ::::::: 

Printed on Cloth, Size 44x80 inches, Roller-mounted 

Sent to any address, prepaid, upon receipt of $10.00 

PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



1300 Golden Gate Ave. 



San Francisco, U. S. A. 






PACIFIC MINING & oil REPORTER 



15 



Before In- lefl for the Bast, Donald Gillies said in an interview, t hat ho 

had never in all hia expert* such a surface showing of copper, and 

• ougfa ore piled up on the damps of the Qreenwater and Death 

Valley m tin alone 1 1 . warrant putting up a nnelter. It would be onlv b 

natter of a short time, I, that a smelter of sunn- deaeript !"ii 

I up in Qreenwater, and that a railroad would be run to a poinl in 

[iroximity with all three railroads passing through the southern country. 

There are lively times ahead for Qreenwater with the carrying out of these 

plans, and from the character of the men behind them there is no doubl 

that they will be put into swift execution, 

ARIZONA. 

Arizona Short of Fuel 

Many Arisona mini's and smelters an' bold up and have been all through 
November because of a shortage of oil for fuel. This shortage is the resull 
of tin- seizure by certain carrier railroads of oil cars en-route which they have 
a right to do under the law in times "t emergency. The company seizing 
tin- oil must, of course, pay tor it. and the shipper is out nothing, but it works 
great hardship on tin- consignee mining company which depends on the oil 
for furl. 

Bisbee 

The most important news is the finding of an entire now body of high- 
grade sulphide ore, in the P. & 1». ground. The strike was made in a drift 
which is being run from the 1,100 tout level of the bake Superior and Pittsburg 
shaft. 

This strike in the Junction mine runs westerly toward the Gardner and 
Sacramento ground of the Copper Queen company. It is one of the best 

strikes yet made in the .lunetion. 

Work is well under way 011 the big smelter which the Imperial Copper 
company will erect just outside of Silver Hell, ami which company is under 
the same management as the Tombstone Consolidated. The smelter will 
have a capacity of 350 tons per day. It will be taxed almost to its capacity 
in smelting the ores of the Imperial, as the daily shipments are now between 
five and ten carloads per day. 

Sinking is being continued at the mines, and the main shaft is down to 
a depth of nearly 1,000 feet. Recently another large body of ore was un- 
covered on the 700 foot level. 

A n important mineral strike was made recently in the Humbug district, 
where a body of ore, from three and one-half to four feet in thickness, of an 
average value of $7."> to the ton, was encountered in the 200 foot level of the 
shaft being sunk on the Olympia mine. The claim is one of a group of five 
locations, covering a large porphyry dyke, about 150 feet in width on the 
surface the strike being made at a point where three mineral bearing veins 
converge, the ore shoot being expected to reach the surface. 

Superior 

The claim on which the Queen company is operating was worked and 
abandoned about 25 years ago. The company now operating there cleaned 
out the old shaft and have been striking a high grade ore. There has been 
considerable controversy over the rights on the lands, which is patented, be- 
tween Wm. Winsor and A. C. Sieboth. Winsor, it is claimed, selected the 



Section Six Oil Co. 



If This Company is composed of practical oil men, and is most 
favorably located on eighty acres of proven land on the now 
famous Section Six, one and a half miles west of Coalinga. The 
land immediately joins the Shreeve Oil Co. and lies directly 
between the Lucile [700 barrels per day] and the K. O. and T. 
Co's well, which is good for from 1,000 to 1,500 barrels per day. 
% The capitalization of the Company is 600,000 shares, 100,000 
of which will be sold for 30c per share for development purposes. 



section six: oil 00. 

530 CITIZENS NATIONAL BANK BUILDING 
r^OS ANGELES, CAL. 



SELLING OUT 

Our entire supply of 

Oil Well Supplies 



BELOW COST 



WRITE FOR PRICES. 



W. T. McFIE SUPPLY CO. 

Bakersfield California 



Stocks and Bon.k lelephona WEST 0155 

High-grade Securities — 1\ 

Mines and Mining Cobll — "Borlini" 

Alfred A. Borlini & Co., Inc. 

Capital, $100,000 

OUR SPECIALTIES 

High-class Investments in Tonopah, Goldfield, 
Bullfrog, Manhattan, and Adjacent Districts 

We handle None But the Best 
OUR AIM 

PROFITS FOR CLIENTS 

NOW OFFERING 

Shares in the Bullfrog Fortuna Mining Company at 
25 cents per share. 

Allotment being rapidly subscribed. 

Write at once for our Booklet "Money Talks." DO NOT 
DELAY. THIS MEANS Y00. 

A. A. BORLINI & CO., Inc. 

Suite 33 Saint Mungo Building, I300 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco 



Sixty men are at present 



land for a mill site and was contested by Sieboth. 
working the mines and dwellings are being put up. 

Prescott 

An important deal was consummated when I*. A. Simon, the Bradshaw 
Mountain mining man, secured a bond on the Hull whacker mine from R. It. 
Burmister. 

It is among the oldest quartz locations in the district having produced 
in the early 80 's a $13,000 gold bar from one run tit" ore taken from its grass 
roots workings, and besides has been a producer of note at intervals ever since. 
It follows a dyke associated with a slate and porphyry contact, running in a 
northwesterly and southeasterly direction, ami is opened by a shaft 200 
feet deep, from which several hundred feet of drifts have been run, showing 
the paystreak to be from four to fourteen inches in thickness, of high grade 
gold ore. 

What appears to be one of the most important strikes made for some 
time in the Big Rug district was reported recently on the properties of the 
Redman Mining company. 

The property is located about two miles west of the Humboldt smelter 
and about two and one-half miles east of the properties of the Jessie Mines 
company, the Dividend and the Lelan mines, all proven properties of merit. 

The vein upon which the working shaft is being sunk is the center erne 
of three parallel veins which follow a porphyry dyke 135 feet in width, in ;i 
northeasterly and southwesterly direction, the footwall of which is s<- li ist 
and the hanging wall diorite. The footwall ledge has been opened by a 
shaft 75 feet in depth showing a paystreak about two and one half feet in 
thickness, sampling $24.65 to the ton. 



CALIFORNIA STOCK & OIL EXCHANGE. 

Following are the latest quotations for stocks of oil companies listed 
on the California Stock & Oil Exchange: 

Bi.l. Asked. 

Oil City I'd Is 

Oyama' 

Peerless 3.25 

Piedmont 1" 

Pittsburg .05 

Sovereign . .30 

Sterling 1.5 

Superior . 

Twenty-Eight 4.00 7. .in 

Wabash . 

West Shore 1.90 

Wolverine 







Bid 


Askee 


Associated Oil Stk. Tr. 


Cer. .50 


.54 








111. 0(1 


Chicago Crude 


(old). 






Chicago Crude 


(new) 


OS 


.10 








.00 


Fortv 




40 








30 

.11 






. . . .Ilii 






. . . in. on 








10 








10 




McKittrick . . . 




05 




Monarch of Arizona . 


08 


.10 



i6 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



SAN FRANCISCO STOCK EXCHANGE 

Following are the latest quotations of mining stocks listed 
Francisco Stock & Exchange Board: 

Alaska 
Bid. Asked. j 

Wild lioose 1.751 

California 

Argonaut 

Bos. Gwtr. Cop 

Brunswick 75 

Bunker Hill 1.70 

Central Eureka 75 

Excel Mt. Cop 1.00 



the San 



Bid. Ask. 



5.00 
.20 
.80 



Belmont 

Belmont Extension 

Boston Tonopah 

Brugker 's J. B. Extension 

1 'alifornia 

Cashboy 

Esperanza 

Golden Anchor 

Golden Crown 

Golden Gate 



.19 



Gold Mountain 08 

Gold Mountain Consolidated .02 

Great Western 05 

Home 15 

Iudiaua Tonopah 02 

Jim Butler 1.35 

Jim Butler Extension 10 

Little Tonopah 

McNamara 70 



Midway 



Greenwater Pay Cop 

Greenwatcr Black Jack . . . .60 

Lightner Mining Co 1.25 

New Hercules 63 

Bed Boy 

S. Eureka M. Co 

Nevada. 
Tonopah, District. 

. . 5.75 Midway Extension 

.19 Mizpah Extension 

.20 Montana 3.S7 

. . Montana Midway Ex 20 

.20 Montana Pittsburg Ex 14 

.16 New York Tonopah Con 25 

.03 North Star 43 

.48 Ohio Tonopah 21 

.19 Ohio Tonopah Extension 

. . Paymaster 02 

.10 Red Rock .extension 03 

.03 Rescue Consolidated 22 

.06 Tonopah Extension 5.75 

.18 Tonopah Home Con 

.03 Tonopah Lode 15 

1.40 Tonopah Silver & G 03 

. . Tonopah of Nevada 

3.0U West End 1.90 

.72 West Tonopah 

2.50 



.19 
.14 
.02 
.46 
.IS 
.10 



.2.42 
Goldfield District. 



Adams 

Aloha 

Atlanta 

Ban, 

Black Ants 

B. B. Bonanza 

Black Butte Extension 
Black Bock 



.59 



.09 
.10 
.12 
.09 

Blue Beil ' 18 

Blue Bull 33 

Blue Quartz 30 

Brook.yn 05 

Butte Goldfield 09 

Booth 88 

C. O. D ■. 75 

Columbia 

Columbia Mountain 98 

Columbia Mountain Ex 06 

Combination Fraction 4.00 

Commonwealth 31 

Conqueror 20 

Cracker Jack 10 

Daisy 2.30 

Daisy Annex 25 

Daisy Extension 11 

Diamoudfield B. B. Con 46 

Dixie 12 

Umpire 10 

Esmeralda 

Federal 

Florence 

Florence Extension 24 

Frances-Mohawk 

Gobi Dust 05 

Goldneld Belmont 

G. Con Mines 7.00 

Goldfield Fairview 

Goldfield Fissure 07 

Goldfield G. Bar Extension.. .28 

Goldfield M. of Nevada 1.27 

ijoldfield Meda. 

Goldfield N. Star 

Goldfield Portland 33 

Gold Flat 

Goldfield L. Strike 17 

Goldfield Kewanas 1.40 

Goldfield Rand .04 

G. 3rd Chance 28 

Grandma 



.06 
.11 

.90 

.95 

1.00 

1.00 

.07 

4.15 

.38 

.21 



2.40 



Co. 



May Queen 
McMahon . 
Milltown M. 

Mohawk 

Mohawk Junior . . 
Mohawk Extension 

. . evada Boy 

Nevada Goldfield . 
Nevada Western . . 
12 Oro 



.47 
.13 
.12 
.27 
.18 
3.50 
.25 
.95 

.50 

.10 
.08 
.29 
1.30 
.11 
.18 
.35 
.37 

1.45 

.30 



Palace Goldfield 

Panyau 

Pennsylvania 05 

Potlat'eh 40 

Red Hills 

Red Lion 

Red Top 3.40 

Red Top Extension 27 

Sandstorm 

Sandstorm Extension 09 

Silver Pick 1.20 

Silver Pick Extension 30 

Simmcrone 

Spearhead Gold 55 

Spearhead Fraction 



St. Ives . 
Sun Dog . 
Sunnyside 
Treasure . 

V erde . . 



.10j Yellow Tiger 



.30 
.62 



.38 
.10 



.40 
.40 
3.90 
.21 
.16 

.45 
.23 
.12 
.04 
.04 
.25 
5.87 
.03 



10.75 

1.95 

.35 



King Keystone Oil Co. 

Lubricating Oils and Creases 

Marine Engine Oils, Boiler Compound, Distillates 

Linseed Oil, Paraffine Wax, Vegetable Oil 

Asphaltum, Animal Oil, Fish Oil 



22 Clay Street 



San Francisco, Cal. 



SEATTLE BRANCH: 
Cor. Pike St. and R. R. Ave. 

REFINERY: West Berkeley, Cal. 



Win. Wallace 



B. W. Charlesworth 



.20 Great Bend -. 93 

.15 G reat Bend Annex 17 

.60 Great Bend Extension ..... .23 

.50 .. jemia 

.Hi Highland 

.11 I umbo 3.35 

.13 Jumbo Extension 1.27 

.10 Kendall 

.19 .^endall Extension 06 

.34, Kewana Extension 24 

Laguna 1.40 

Lone Star 27 

Lou Dillon 35 

Lucky Boys . . 

Mayne 15 



WALLACE & CHARLESWORTD 




.04 



.16 
.03 



Vernal 18 

Wonder 06 

Yellow Eose 09 



.27 
.15 

3.50 
.28 
.70 
.11 

1.25 
.31 
.43 

.30 
.88 
.05 
.16 
.17 

.20 

.07 



.10 



Alliance 

Amargosa Gold Mine 06 

Amctliyst 55 .57 

Big Bullfrog 05 .06 

Black Spar IS 

Bonnie Clare 33 

Bullfrog Annex 04 

Bullfrog Banner 90 

Bullfrog Combination 08 

Bullfrog Consolidated 04 

Bullfrog Daisy 44 

bullfrog Extension 15 

Bullfrog Gold King 41 

Bullfrog Midas 



Bullfrog District. 
.. .15 



Homcstake Extensiou 21 

Lige Harris 05 .06 

Little Bullfrog 05 

Mayflower Annex 25 

Mayflower Consolidated . . . .63 .64 

.35 Maryland 02 .10 

.05 Midnight 20 

Montana Bullfrog 13 .14 

10 Mt. Hill Mines 14 

Montgomery Mt 44 .45 

,4GJMontana-Shoshone Ex 18 .20 

..Nugget 15 .16 

.43| North Shoshone 18 

.80|Ohio Bullfrog 25 



PLUMBERS, TINNERS and 

Galvanized Tank Builders 

Everything in Plumbing, Tin and 
Sheet Iron Work 

Estimate furnished on all kinds 

of work 

Oil Tanks, Bath Tubs, Sinks, 

Wagon Tanks, Toilets, Pumps, 

Water Barrels, Lavatories, 

Wind Mills . , 



P&B 

Coalinga, Cal. 



Agent of 
ROOFING PAINTS 



B&R PAPERS for Sheathing Dwelling 

Are Unequalled. 

Write for samples and prices. 

BONESTELL, RICHARDSON & CO. 

California's Leading Paper House 
473 to 485 SIXTH STREET . 



SAN FRANCISCO 




WRITI NG IN SIGHT 

Just Purchased New 

L. C. SMITH & BROS. 

_ TYPEWRITERS 

Nattaan-Dohrman Co. . 6 machines Union Trust Bank . . 5 machines 
Cal. Safe Deposit Bank .5 " Cal. Wine Ass'n .... 6 

Also City and County Bank, & Nevada Bank 
Catalogue Free 

L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

1820 Fillmore Street 

Telephone "West 6288 

Branches:— Los Angeles, Portland, Seattle, Spokane, 

Taeoma. 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 






Bull: 

Bull- . .11 

Bull' 16 

Bolln 





Denver Bnurrog Annex 25 

1 Bullfrog in 

1.10 

Bar 1.20 1 



lar Extension 

Gold Bar So. Ex 

- rn 69 

Mountain Qoldfleld 09 .11 

Happy Hooligan 10 .13 

stk. Consolidated 1.20 l.25|Yankoe Qirl 

Manhattan District. 



Original Bullfrog 

r El 

| lvania Bullfrog 

Piute 

ito Twnst 07 



.-_'l Shoshone 

.28!Sho8hono-BulIfrog Gold us 

i. National Bank 

cum Bullfrog is 

Steinway 

Tramp Consolidated 1.70 

Vall.v View 

\ rivet 

Ventura 

Wolverine 03 

Yankee Bov 14 

14 



.14 

.16 



..jiril Pool Extension 04 

Atlantic and Pacific 06 

Bull Doc 

Cornel 03 

Gold Wedge in 

Granny ti. M 

Indian Camp 1.1" 

.lumping Jack 60 

Little Grey 60 

Manhattan Atlas 

Manhattan Belmont 06 

Man.iattan Belle 

Manhattan Big Four 09 

Manhattan Broncho 1.3 

Manhattan Buffalo 09 

Manhattan * larson 

Manhattan < Vntrn! 

Manhattan Consolidated . .. .84 

Manhattan < on. Ex 20 

Manhattan Combination . .. .11 
Manhattan Crescent 14 



.05 Manhattan Humboldt . . 

.07 Manhattan Little Joe . 

,os Manhattan Jumbo 

.04 Manhattan M. Co. Nov. 

.20 Manhattan Mammoth . 

,29 Manhattan Mohawk . . . 
1.15 Manhattan 

.5] Manhattan 



.65 
.15 

.07 



Manhattan 
Manuattan 

Manhattan 



Mondy Ex. 
* Iriental . . 
Bed Top . . 

Russ 

Standard . 



.08 

.05 
.04 
.17 
.18 



.15 

.06 



.05 



.09 Manhattan Verde 05 

.10 Manhattan Wolftone 15 

.16|Mustang Manhattan 

,12Mustang Annex 02 



.12 
,15 

.16 
.76 

.28 



Manhattan Cowboy 14 

Manhattan Dexter 74 

Manhattan Frisco 26 

Manhattan (i. Gate 20 

Other Districts. 
Won 



Mustang Extension 

Original Manhattan 31 

Pine Nut 28 

Rocky Hill 16 

Seyler Humphrey 11 

Stray Dog 72 

Thanksgiving 09 

Whale 10 

Yellow Horse 10 



Aliee of 

I ongress 20 

Diamondfield Triumph 34 

Eagle 's Nest 38 

Fail view Silver King 59 

Pairview Eagle 

Faiiview 1M. Mt 

A lor Leasing 40 

Golden Terra 

Goldyke Reef 13 

Ida ..^mes 05 

lack Pot 



.21 
.35 
.39 
.60 
1,00 
.35 

.08 
.15 

1.60 



Johnnie Consolidated 

Lida Bell 

Nevada Hills 3.00 

N. H. Florence 

New Sunshine 

North Star Wonder 

Pittsburg S. Peak 1.85 

Bound Mt 1.00 

nound Mt. Alpine 08 

Round Mt. Extension 19 

Ruby Wonder 28 

S. Pk. Mavflower 31 



.11 
.10 
.20 

.os 

.08 

.10 

.Hi 
.37 

1.72 
.20 
.1 I 
.12 

.16 
,15 

.10 
.07 
.05 

.is 

.15 
.15 

.07 
.10 
.06 



.13 

.04 
.19 
.35 
.29 

.13 

.73 
.10 
.11 
.11 



.19 

.07 

.20 

.45 

.32 

1.90 

.10 
.20 
.30 



THE OIL MARKET 
American Position 

Following are the latest quotations (wholesale) for mineral oils 
Francisco: 

Cts. 



Water White Coal Oil, in bulklO 11 

Bpeeial Coal Oil 12% 

Pearl Oil, in cases 17 

Astral 17 

Star 17 

Extra Star 20 

Elaine 26 

Eocene 19 

Stove Gasoline, in bulk 17% 

Stove Gasoline, in eases 24 

Motor Gasoline, in bulk 17'^ 



Motor Gasoline, in cases 

No. 1 Engine Distillate, iron 

barrels or drums 

No. 2 Engine Distillate, iron 

barrels or drums 

Oases, 6% more. 

Benzine, in bulk 

Benzine, in cas-es 

86-degree Gasoline, in bulk. . . . 
86-degree Gasoline, iu cases . . 



THE OIL MARKET. 



PRIVATE ROOHS 



JULES WITTMAN 



at San 

Cts. 
21 

08 

06% 

12% 
19 
30 
36 



Russian Position. 

At Baku there has been no change in the situation, everything lias re- 
mained quiet and work is being pushed forward rapidly. During the past 
fortnight there has been very little ekauge in the quotations for crude 
petroleum and its products, but the -market has been firmer and the prices 
for kerosene and residuals have advanced. Crude petroleum for prompt 
delivery has remained firm at 22% copecks per pood and there are now sellers 
for forward delivery at 23Vi copecks per pood. The price for residuals, how- 
ever, has advanced one copeck per pood for prompt delivery. 

The quotation for kerosene, F. O. B. Baku for prompt delivery has ad- 
vanced *j copeck to 27% eopecks per pood, but there are still no sellers 
of large quantities for forward delivery. For delivery F. O. B. vessel on 
the Caspian Sea, the quotation for kerosene lias advanced to 27H copecks 
per pood. 

The output from the Baku oil fields for the month of October O. S. shows 
a considerable advance over that for the previous month, and has exceeded 
40 million poods. So long as existing conditions prevail, it seems quite prob- 
ablo that tin; production will in the course of the next mouth be raised to 
4a million poods. 

Indian Market Report. 

The quotations for lamp oils on the Indian markets during the past 
fortnight remained firm and practically unchanged; the only alteration being 



Jules' Restaurant 

Only Hirst-Class Restaurant in Burned District 
Formerly 315-323 Pine Street 

Regular Dinner, with Wine, 75 cts. 
Sundays and Holidays, $1 00 

OPEN EVENIN6S 

326 BUSH STREET, Bet. Montgomery and Kearny. San Francisco 



GAS OR STEAM POWER 

Either available at your well when your pumping engine 
is equipped with a 




D. C. & U. 

Convertible 
Cylinder 

Manufactured by 



Used in every Oil Field 
in J i[;l 5: i ::. 



Simple, reliable and easy to start. Can "be changed from 
gas to steam and vice versa in five minutes. 
Can be attached at the well to any drilling engine. 
Write for prices and particulars to 

E. R. UHLIN, San Pedro, Cal. 

SOXjIE AGEN T" 
PACIFIC COAST 

Cable Address " ROMANIC LONDON " 

LANE & MACANDREW 

26 Great St. Helens, 
London, England 

Oil Merchants and Brokers 

Also 
Brokers for Building, Purchasing, Selling and Chartering 

OIL TANK STEAMERS 



Managers of the Following Tank Steamers: 

'LE COQ," "ORIFLAMME," "LUCILINE." "LUX," "TEREK,' 

"BALAKANI," "CAUCASIAN." " EUPLECTELA," 

" ROCKLIGHT." " TURBO," " PINNA." 



i8 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



an advance of 3 annas in the quotation for Russian case oil, and of one 
anna in tbe quotation for Burmah oil in the Calcutta market. 

The deliveries during the fortnight have somewhat increased, and the 
market has a somewhat firmer tendency, but the increased demand will prob- 
ably not be maintained to its full limit much longer. 

The quotations were as follows: 
Bombay— Rupees 

American case oil 4. 

Eussian case oil 4- 

' ' Elephant " oil in tins 3. 



3. 



4. 

10. 
10. 

8. 

8. 



3. 



Sumatra ' ' Rising Sun ' ' in tins 

Borneo oil in bulk 

Burmah oil in bulk 

Karachi — 

American case oil 

Burmah oil in tins 3. 

Borneo oil in tins 2. 

Sumatra oil in bulk 2. 

American oil in bulk 2. 

Calcutta — 

American case oil 4. 

Eussian case oil 4. 

Burmah oil in bulk 2. 

Borneo oil in bulk 2. 

Sumatra oil in bulk 3. 

American oil in bulk 3. 

English Market Eeport. 
During the last fortnight the quotations on the London and Liverpool 
markets for American and Eussian lamp oils have remained unchanged. The 
deliveries continue to show slight improvement, but it is only natural at 
this time of the year the deliveries should increase. The market ■ is firm, 
and the quotations are as follows: 

London — 
Eussian oil, 5%d. ex wharf in barrels. 
American oil, (3d. @ 6%d. ex wharf in barrels. 

Liverpool — 
Eussian oil, 5%d. @ 6d. ex wharf in barrels. 
American oil, 6d. @ 6'V^d. ex wharf in barrels. 



14. 
3. 
14. 
14. 
14. 

6. 

4. 
13. 
13. 

2. 




EASTERN EXPORTS. 



Following are the exports of mineral oils from the Eastern ports of the 
United States for the month of September, 1906: 

Quantities. Values. 

Crude — Gallons Dollars. 

Baltimore 

Boston and Charlestown 

Delaware 

New York 1,483 89 

Philadelphia 7,877,454 475,810 

Galveston 4,338,757 198,334 



Total 

Naphthas — 

Baltimore 

Boston and Charlestown 

Delaware 

New York 

Philadelphia 

Galveston 



12,217,694 



3,120 



762,134 
963,930 



Total 

Illuminating — 

Baltimore 

Boston and Charlestown 

Delaware 

New York 

Philadelphia 

Galveston 



1,729,184 



.24,780 



Total 



Lubricating and paraffin- 
Baltimore 

Boston and Charlestown 

Delaware 

New York 

Philadelphia 

Galveston 



41,074,168 

31,55S,416 

2,506,602 

75,163,966 

213,811 
22,655 



7,887,900 

3,740,771 

613,769 

12,478,906 



260,000 

4,027 

3,172,127 

903,756 

Total 4,339,910 

Total mineral oils — 

Baltimore 213,811 

Boston and Charlestown 310,555 

Delaware 

New York . 49,729,712 

Philadelphia 47,312,69S 

Galveston 8,362,884 



• Total 

Residuum — 

Baltimore 

Boston and Charlestown 

Delaware 

New York 

Philadelphia 

Galveston 



Total 105,929,660 



674,239 



415 

111,305 
82,337 



194,057 



2,826 

2,904,963 

1,699,215 

153,529 

4,760,533 

29,055 
4,417 

1,009,615 

353,553 

85,927 

1,482,567 



13,000 

450 

102,755 

27,113 

143,318 

29,055 
20,658 

4,026,422 

2,713,676 

464,903 

7,254,714 



Steel Oil Tanks 

Refineries Erected Complete 

II you want 

Promptness 
Economy . 
Durability 

and 

Honest 
Workmanship 

WRITE US 



Established 1872 



Oil Tank erected for O. R. & N. in Oregon 



Win. Graver Tank Works 

East Chicago, Ind. 



Contract 

Drilling deep 
wells for 
Oil or 
Water 
Furnish Com- 
plete Plants 
for Drilling 
Prices Seas- 
onable 




Box 237 



W. E. YOULE 



Wanted 

Good Second- 
hand Rigs 

Oil Well Tools 

Oil Well Cas- 
ing and Pipe 

Engines and 
Boilers 

Fishing Tools 

SAN LUIS 
OBISPO, CAL. 



FRESNO COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY 

Incorporated under the laws of California, January 21, 1901 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 

IMTIylyY PAID CP 

SEARCHERS OF RECORDS AND 
CONVEYANCE 



Abstracts of Title carefully compiled at reasonable rates 



IVo. lllfS K St. 



Fresno, Cal. 



A. P. (DAY 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

[WHOLESALE AND RETAIL] 

fiflost Reliable and Complete Stoek of eamp 

supplies and oil men's furnishings 

in Coalinga 

"T77"ells Z^a^rgro <£z Company 
COALINGA, CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC MINIM; £ oil. Iv'KI'OKTKK. 



BULL'S HEAD OIL WORKS 



San Francisco, California 




Works at Bull's Head Point ^' fl^^^^B 0ffice < » Front Street 
Near Martinez ,sS^~ .#^^^^t^%lP«' San Francisco 



Refiners of 

California Crude Oil 

from which we make the finest qualities of Gasolines, Benzines, Engine 
Distillates, Naphthas, Kerosene Oils and Lubricating Oils, including Cylinder 
Oils, Marine Engine Oils, Red Engine Oils, Neutral Oils, Spindle Oils and 
Dynamo Machine Oils; also Castor Machine Oils and Cup Greases, Skid 
Grease, Skid Oil, Axle Grease, Belt Dressing, Black Varnish Paint, Terrene 
Turpentine, Terrene Linseed Oil, Soap Stock, Fertilizing Material, and all 
grades of Asphalt; also Road Oil and Fuel Oil :::::: 



The Largest and Most Complete Oil Works, with one 
exception, on the Pacific Coast of America 



Entire cargoes of Kerosene Oil in cases, or mixed cargoes, loaded at our own 
deep water wharf and pier at Bull's Head Point on the Bay of San Francisco, for 
shipnient to any part of the world. 

Correspondence Invited Orders Solicited 




PACIFIC MINING & OIL EEPORTER. 



THE NEW STAR IN NEVADA'S FIRMAMENT 

The Wonder Silver Star 



They wonder at nothing in the new camp of Wonder except 
the richness of their ore, and so many rich strikes have been 
made in a short space of time that they are now regarded as 
ordinary every-day occurrences. 

Although this far-famed mining district is now only a little 
more than six months old, yet ore of shipping value has already 
been opened up in nearly two score different places in the 
district. All authorities concur in the opinion that Wonder 
will rival Goldfield for richness and wealth-producing capabil- 
ities. The ore is there in immense quantities. 

THE SILVER STAR'S PROPERTY. 

In the central portion of the district, about midway between 
Nevada Wonder (for which the Tonopah Mining Company 
paid $300,000) and Ruby Wonder, whose shares are selling 
at 35 cents, lie the two claims of Wonder Silver Star (known 
as Silver Star and Silver Star No. 1) which endline and are 
traversed for almost their entire length of 3,000 feet by an 
enormous outcropping ledge. At the north of Silver Star 
No. 1 claim, a highly mineralized cross vein intersects the main 
ledge, and mining experts agree that at the intersection of these 
two veins will be found a deposit of fabulous richness. 

Surface assays on this property of $80 per ton, gold and 
silver, are readily obtainable, and it is confidently believed 
that a resonable amount of development work will reveal ore 
bodies of astonishing extent and values. 

In relative position these claims lie with reference to the 
main property at Wonder as the Tonopah Extension does to 
the Mizpah at Tonopah, or the Red Top does to the Jumbo 
at Goldfield, with the strongest and best defined ledge on 
Wonder. 

ENGINEER'S REPORT. 

We invite careful perusal of the following report on 
the property of the Wonder Silver Star by one of the most 
capable and well known mining engineers in Nevada: 

Goldfield, Nev., November 3, 1906. 
Wonder Silver Star Mining Company, 

Goldfield, Nevada. 
Gentlemen: Concerning your inquiry relative to the Silver 
Star and Silver Star No. 1 mining claims in the Wonder 
district ; the ground is favorably located in the central portion 
of this rich district; in fact, these locations were made prior 
to the bonanza discoveries. They contain immense dikes, 
conspicuously outcropping and identical with those on which 
bonanza ore has been developed. 

I personally examined the ground in preference to the sur- 
rounding country at the time of the first excitement, on June 
1st, as the outcropping was far more conspicuous than others 
which have since developed into shippers. .Their surface in- 
dications are equal to the Red Top mine, in Goldfield.. 

Respectfully yours, 

CHAS. R. MURDOCH. 



ABLE MANAGEMENT. 

The company is officered and managed by some of Gold- 
field's most successful and enterprising mining operators, 
whose names alone are a guarantee of honest, progressive and 
capable management. 

The President, Mr. A. D. Myers, is a pioneer Nevada pros- 
pector and is, without a doubt, as keen a judge of a mining 
property as can be found in that commonwealth. He was one 
of the locators of the famous Combination mine of Goldfield, 
which has paid upwards of $800,000 in dividends during the 
past two years. Mr. Myers was also one of the principal hold- 
ers of Mohawk stock and only recently parted with his inter- 
est in that company for nearly half a million dollars. He is 
also responsible for the triumphant success of the Combination 
Fraction Mining Company of Goldfield, whose shares have 
recently sold as high as $8.00, having advanced to that figure 
from approximately as many cents in less than a year. 

Mr. Myers considers WONDER SILVER STAR to possess 
every qualification of a world-beater and he is extremely 
sanguine of its ultimate tremendous success. 

The Vice-President of the company is Mr. P. E. Carney of 
the very successful law firm of Detch & Carney, Goldfield. 

Treasurer — Mr. Herbert T. Cook of the banking house of 
John S. Cook & Company, the wealthiest financial institution 
in Nevada. 

Secretary — Mr. W. E. Kinney, member of the Goldfield 
Mining Exchange and a gentleman of the highest integrity. 

The foregoing, with Mr. H. C. Morris, Mine Owner and 
Superintendent of Nixon & Wingfi eld's Blue Bull property, 
constitute the directorate. 

Mr. Morris will act as Superintendent of the WONDER 
SILVER STAR, and a campaign of active development is to 
be inaugurated immediately. 

A property must have exceeding merit or men of the above 
stamp will not identify themselves with it. 

The company is capitalized for 1,000,000 shares, par value 
$1.00, stock full paid and non-assessable ; treasury allotment, 
400,000 shares. 

We now offer for subscription a limited amount of stock at 
25 cents a share, the proceeds to go into the treasury for the 
purpose of opening \ip the property and making a paying mine 
in the quickest time possible. This is a rare opportunity for 
an investment either to hold for dividends or for a speculation 
for quick returns. Only enough stock will be sold to fully 
develop the property and. place the company on a self-support- 
ing basis. As a select money-maker, certain to command a 
greatly enhanced value in the right near future, we recommend 
it just as strongly and conscientiously as words can define. 

We invite you to call on us or correspond with us in con- 
nection with the splendid profit-making opportunities offered 
by judicious selection at this time of Southern Nevada mining 
securities. Our long and successful experience, our knowledge, 
and our facilities are at your service. 

Send for our FREE WEEKLY MARKET LETTER. Let 
it be your guide in the present active market. 



W. C. COX & COMPANY, Inc. 

Members San Francisco and Tonopah Mining Exchange 

Suite 243-244 Monadnock Building San Francisco, California 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



Vol. VIII. No. 5 



San Francisco, Cal., January 5, 1907 



Price, 25 Cents 



RETROSPECT AND PROSPECT 

The year's work in the California oil n. Ms has resulted in many changes 
principally for the upbuilding of the oil Industry and the general welfare of 
the producers. Tin- close of the year 1906 is coincident with the end of low 

prices for the production of the state. The beginning of another year sees the 
dominant forces for better prices well in hand of the situation and there 
ry reason to believe thai the future of the oil producers in California 
is particularly brilliant, that the vicissitudes of the past arc practically ever, 
and that all will now enjoy the fruits of their labors. 
THE YEAR'S PRODUCTION. 
The year's production shows a material tailing off from that of 1905. But 
this is wholly on account of a well organized movement and a general feeling 
of sympathy instituted at the beginning of the year just ended. By that 
time producers saw the cause of low prices and set about the only possible 
i — the curtailment of produetion until the consumption of oil should 
equal the capacity of the wills. Therefore, development has been wholly 
along the line of extending the proven areas than to increase the produetion. 
In many instances where new production was secured, the wells were immedi- 
ately capped. Over one hundred good producing wells have been shut down, 
the greater part of the year. This alone has been the cause of the decline, 
Which it is believed, amounts to over eight millions of barrels. 

CURTAILMENT. 

From the first of the year there was a strong tendency to curtailment of 
produetion. In some instances the movement was the result of agitation and 
combinations, in others it was purely individual. But in all instances the 
result was telling. The daily production fell off rapidly. Storage oil was 
called upon to fill the shortage from some of the fields and then prices 
Commenced to strengthen gradually but firmly. Producers thoroughly dis- 
couraged by long waiting again took heart, cast their lot with the more coura- 
geous, the move became contageous, and all now enjoy a more stable basis 
in the oil business than ever before. Even the marketing companies antici- 
pate and welcome an advance in price, the only one left to mourn being the 
consumer, particularly the railroad companies. 

ADVANCE IN PRICES. 

The price for oil at the wells has materially advanced during the year 
and there is a strong prospect of a still greater advance during 1907. While 
one district has been tied up at a price of 27^ cents its production is not 
great enough to greatly influence the price in other fields where a greater 
price is sought. While we earnestly believe that the productive capacity of 
wells already drilled in the state is fully adequate to all demands, the amount 
of oil available is not sufficient to meet the contracts now existing and on 
which delivery will soon be commenced. A greater demand for oil means an 
immediate advance in price for that part of the commodity not already con- 
tracted at a lesser price. 

DEVELOPMENT. 
Notwithstanding the low price prevailing for oil the development of sev- 
eral of the fields of the state has continued uninterruptedly. Not a develop- 
ment to increase production but to extend and prove large areas of land and 
to provide for future requirements when the price of oil should be suffi- 
ciently high to warrant development for the production. The best of results 
have been secured. In the Coalinga field several square miles has been 
added to its proven territory, making it the largest in area of any oil district 
in the state. In the Santa Maria field, properties have been proven up by 
extensive drilling and one extension of five miles has been made to the main 
field by the recent bringing in of a good well on the east. Kern River's 
productive area was long ago determined and only such wells as was required 
to keep up the production have been drilled. Yet the Southern Pacific 
Railroad Company, in assembling material for the drilling of seventy-five 
wells in this district has shown its faith in its productivity, which we believe 
cannot be questioned. Sunset Midway and the McKittrick fields have not 
been attractive fields for wild-catting on account of their inadequate trans- 
portation facilities, but we believe they may be materially extended by 
careful development. A very few wells have been drilled in these dis- 

tricts during the year. The various southern fields have each been more or 
less developed with favorable results. The Pullerton field, in particular, 

has presented some surprises in the way of new production. The Amalgamated 
or Salt Lake field, has been greatly extended and is holding up in production. 
Altogether the development for the year shows the possibility of extension 
and development under favorable conditions. 

NEW FIELDS. 

No new oil fields have been developed during the year. In the Arroyo 
Grande district, where one well had been developed at the close of 1905, one more 
producing well lias been completed on the same property. These successes have 
been the incentive for extensive wildcat ting in the surrounding territory. The 
formation is favorable to development and the field is considered a promising 
one. The oil so far developed is heavy, about 14 degrees, but is particularly 
valuable on account of the close proximity to tide water and a good port — 
Port Harford and Oil Tort — where gravity pipe lines would readily convey 
the production. The status of the field is given on another page. 



PERMANENCY OF THE WELLS. 

The great permanency of I he oil wells of < 'alifornia is QOW an estab- 
lished fact. Wells that have produced constantly for a period of Prom ten to 
fifteen years are yet paying propositions. The greal thickness of s;inds, 
ranging from 100 to 1 KHI feel and probably averaging more than t00 feet; 
the great saturation or oil-content of the sand, and the usual absence of water 
in the oil stratum, all tend to long life and permanency of the wells. We give 
"California's Reserve Supplv" on another page of this issue. 
GREAT PRODUCING CAPACITY OF FIELDS. 

All we know absolutely of, the productive capacity of California oil fields 
is what they have already produced. But from this we can readily ascertain 
their probable production. And it is by no means small. Fifty millions of 
barrels per year for many years is a most conservative estimate if juice and 
other conditions were favorable. Thousands of acres of practically proven 
territory lies yet undrilled, while the already developed territory holds up 
almost to its original output. Coalinga dveloped territory is considered to be 
less than one tenth of its proven area. Its present production, with one-third 
of its wells shut down is six millions of barrels per year. What then is its 
possible production? One well in Santa Maria has averaged 1800 barrels a 
day for 18 months, a total of nearly a million barrels. Another well, the 
Hartnell gusher of the Union Oil Company, produced a million and a half bar- 
rels of oil in a little over a year. Several other wells of this district have al- 
most as good a record. Its wells are nearly all shut in just now on accounl 
of low prices, but its probable output is enormous. In all of the districts 
of the state, wells hold up phenominally well, many producing well after Imi 
and twelve years constant production. 

ADDITIONAL EQUIPMENT. 

New equipment for the year consists mostly of two new pipe lines in the 
Santa Maria field and several additional tank steamers. A refinery and wharf 
is being erected at Oil Port, near Port Harford. Several new pipe Hues are 
now projected, one of which, that of the Associated between Santa Maria and 
Gaviota, is now an assured fact, inasmuch as the pipe is being shipped for the 
purpose. The Union Oil Company has the pipe on hand for an eight inch line 
between Santa Maria and Port Harford and work on the same should com- 
mence at once. The Southern Pacific Railway completed an eight inch rifled 
line between Kern River and Delano, which is said to be a success. It is 
known that this line has been surveyed through to San Francisco and that 
branch lines to McKittrick and Midway have also been surveyed to -connect 
with it at Delano. The Standard Oil Company has a pipe line surveyed 
between Midway and Port Harford and has already secured some of -the 
rights of way. The building of this line depends on the ability of the mono- 
poly to tie up the output of the Midway field. The car shortage continues and 
there seems to be no effort made to alleviate the evil. Legislation should be 
enacted to provide a remedy and enforce it, for with adequate shipping at hand, 
every producer could enjoy the fruits of his labors independently. 
A GROWING MARKET. 

In direct contrast to the curtailment of the production of the state has 
been the greatly increased usage of oil in this country and its introduction 
into foreign countries. Several recently made contracts with Japan will 
nearly double the exportation of crude oil from California. Delivery on these 
contracts will commence within a few months and will create an immediate 
demand for a greater amount of oil than is now being produced in the state. 
This condition will immediately swell the price little short of that now being 
sought by the Independents. The first run of California oil through the Isth- 
mian pipe line will commence sometime during this month. A shipment having 
left San Francisco late in December in the tank steamer "Argyle'' for that 
destination. It is said that enough oil has been contracted in the eastern 

markets to keep several vessels constantly in service. The aggregate amount 
of business by this service will, it is claimed, amount to several millions 
of barrels per year. A table printed on another page, gives the exports of oil 
from the Pacific ports for the first ten months of 190b". Local consumption 
of oil is constantly increasing, especially on the railways by cause of their 
greatly increased business. The Western Pacific, now building, will call for 
a great amount of oil in a comparatively short time. By the close of the 
present year the consumption of California oil should amount to at least 
3,500,000 barrels a month, an amount the state's oil fields can readily pro- 
duce and maintain. 

PROSPECTS FOR BETTER PRICES. 

An extended market, more adequate facilities and more, perhaps than all 
else, the general advancement in knowledge of existing conditions in the 
oil business, gives the most conclusive assurance of better prices. The general 
tendency of consolidation of interests into several strong companies is par- 
ticularly encouraging, inasmuch as it will practically eliminate the possibility 
of manipulation of the market. A greater competition will strengthen the 
market and give a greater confidence and permanency than would be possible 
under monopoly control. 

IN RE OURSELVES. 

Notwithstanding our great losses in the San Francisco holocaust the 
Pacific Mining & Oil Reporter has enjoyed a most prosperous year and we 
enter the New Year with a greater confidence and determination than over 
before. We take this opportunity of thanking our many patrons for their 
most liberal financial and moral support, and, wishing all a most pros] 
New Year, we herewith submit the result of our feeble efforts. 

THE EDITOR. 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER. 



RETROSPECTIVE NEVADA 

Special Correspondence: 

Goldfield, Nevada, December, 31. — "With the Yuletide season comes leisure 
among the busy brokers and miners of Nevada to sit back and think. The 
natural tendency among men who deal in stocks is to look forward to the days 
of advance or possible decline in shares, but the past week in Goldfield has 
brought forth a deal of retrospection. 

The men who have made the camps of the battle-born state remember that 
on New Year's day four years ago the present site of Goldfield was a track- 
less waste. Only a little more than three years ago a half dozen campers 
made up the population of the present thriving cit} r of 15,000 souls. Where 
burros once bore the outfits they now come by steam and their owners in 
pullmans. On arrival here they speed to neighboring camps in automobiles. 
Isolated tents of three years since are supplanted by skyscrapers of stone, 
the windlasses of those days by the electric hoists of these. The mines of 
Goldfield have made the town of Goldfield a city which ranks at the head 
of the Pacific Coast column in its volume of commerce, business of its banks 
and its railroads, its express and its post office, its production of gold and 
its transfer of stocks, and then the old timers go back to the old times. 

Goldfield 's first location was the Sandstorm claim of Harry Stimler and 
William March, who journeyed hither from Tonopah in February of 1903. They 
reported to friends at Tonopah the discovery of rich ore on the north slope 
of Columbia Mountain, which is about two miles north of the heart of the 
now Goldfield and a stampede resulted. 

Purely accidental is the exact site of the town. Al. Myers and T. D. 
Murphy were among the earliest pioneers and staked the Combination Frac- 
tion and other claims worth many million of dollars. They pitched their 
tents at Rabbit Springs, some two miles southwest of the diggings, but in 
travelling from the camp to claim, they discovered signs of water and dug 
a well where is now the corner of Main and Myers streets, Goldfield. Subse- 
quent incomers camped at the spot and from that nucleus grew the city. 

Next among the earliest arrivals was Elmer J. Chute, a surveyor. He 
with Murphy and Myers, joined by Ole Elliott, Harry and Tom Ramsy, H. 0. 
Hall, Con Crooks, J. H. Foreman, George Winkler and L. L. Patrick, located 
the Goldfield Placer and later organized the town site, which took over the 
Placer's holdings. This was in October, 1903. That same month there was 



For twenty years Tom Lockhart felt the pangs of poverty in his 
tireless search for a mine that would make him independent. He found 
it in the Florence. 

Fresh from successful ventures in Tonopah, young George Wingfield 
plunged into the Goldfield camp and made his first winning from a block 
of ground where there is now sinking the main working shaft of the Florence. 
From that start he builded his colossal fortune from the mineral wealth of the 
Sandstorm, Kendall, Mohawk and other well known properties, achieving his 
crowning success in the purchase and merger of six of the most illustrious 
producers in the district. 

Mohawk, best known now of all Nevada bonanzas, first showed signs of ore 
on April 16th, 1906. On that day stock went begging at 56 cents. Within 
seven months afterwards it had scored an advance of nearly 350,000 per 
cent. James F. Mitchell, who was Nevada's Republican candidate for 
Governor last November, had a lease on the Mohawk and abandoned it as 
a bad job. Some of his successors were within but a few feet of the treasure 
vault and had almost decided to quit the camp, when they determined to 
spend another week and broke into the ore that is making a shipment of a 
million dollars to the car. Mohawk has produced more gold in less time 
from the smallest acreage of any mine in the history of the world. This is a. 
fact, not a theory. The figures to back the asertion are $10,000,000 in 
eight months from less than three acres and from a depth not exceeding 100 
feet. As indisputable evidence there lie sacked in the vaults of the Gold- 
field banks today $2,000,000 worth of Mohawk ore that is worth from 
$10 to $50 per pound. 

Goldfield district, according to a safe conservative estimate, is producing 
now at the rate of $25,000,000 per annum, the mines contributing to the total 
being the Mohawk, Red Top, Jumbo, Combination, St. Ives, Gold Bar, Daisy, 
Com. Fraction, Great Bend, Black Butte, Florence, Kendall, Sandstorm, Belmont, 
and Goldfield Mining. There are other intermittent producers which bid 
fair to eventually enter the regular class. It is not a wild venture to 
forecast for Nevada, arrival at first place among all the gold producing 
states of the Union in the year 1907. Not included in the figures quoted, 
are the millions of tons of milling ore, cast upon the dumps, pierced by the 
tunnels, uncovered by the drifts and blocked out in the stopes. 

Four reduction works are in active operation in Goldfield district. 
The fifth is building by the Florence. The Goldfield Consolidated Mines 




o! (he Mohawk Mines, Goldtold 



organized the mining district of Goldfield, and Claude M. Smith, the present 
incumbent, was elected recorder. 

In November of 1903, Main street was laid off by the grubbing away 
of its sage brush and many of the ehoisest lots of the present were given 
free to any who would occupy them. Those free lots now run into the 
thousands of dollars. Where stands the $S0,000 Nixon block was a shack 
that sold for a song. Twenty-five feet of frontage which is occupied by the 
Northern Saloon, the largest drinking and gambling house in the city, was 
first sold for $25, sold again for $350 and then lost on a single hand in a game 
of poker. Fifty dollars bought the site upon which was erected the magnificent 
home of the Montezuma Club. 

The government recognized Goldfield as an entity in its establishment of 
a post office in January of 1904, and the district recorder, Claude Smith, 
was honored with the appointment of postmaster and started business in a 
tent. Goldfield 's post office today does a business of $150,000 per annum, 
employs from twelve to twenty clerks, meets a pay roll of $20,000 a year 
and sells stamps at the rate of one dollar per capita population each month. 

L. L. Patrick bought from Al. Myers and T. D. Smith the Combination 
mine in the fall of 1903, paying $5,000 on the purchase price of $75,000 on 
October 26th. Three months thereafter he had netted enough to settle thp 
balance of the account. Since then Combination has paid nearly $1,000,000 
in dividends and was recently sold for $5,000,000. 

Charlie and Harry Taylor were working on a pipe line near Tonopah 
when the news of the Sandstorm strike reached town. They dropped their 
tools and hurried to Goldfield and acquired the Red Top, Jumbo, Florence and 
Atlanta. There were thirteen claims in the group and they gave Dick 
Colburn half interest in his choice of them as compensation for the survey 
of the group. Colburn took the Red Top, which has shipped and milled more 
than $300,000 worth of ore. A. A. Bussey happened to see a shooting scrape 
in Tonopah and was summoned as a witness to Belmont. He lacked the 
money to defer the expenses of the trip and made a fruitless effort to hy- 
pothecate his one-third interest in the Daisy mine at Diamondfield for $40. 
That same one-third interest is today worth a cold million. 



Company will soon begin the construction of a plant able to care for 500 
tons per day. The Nevada Copper Mining and Smelting Company, a Maine 
corporation with a capital of $10,000,000 to carry out its plans, will before the 
end of the year 1907, have placed in commission a smelter with a capacity of 
1000 tons daily. 

Electricity is the motive power of Goldfield. It is conveyed to the towns 
and factories and mills and smelters and lighting plants of Goldfield, Tono- 
pah, Silver Peak, Manhattan and Bullfrog from Bishop Creek in California, 
which is eighty-three miles westward from Goldfield. 

As the year 1906 neared its dying hours some conception of the value 
of time was possible from an observation of the movements of the leasers, 
the majority of whose terms expired with the old year. In two instances 
there were made bulky and weighty shipments of machinery from Denver, 
which flew to the Goldfield mines on special trains and mile-a-minute 
schedules, traveling in sections of the Overland Limited. Hurrying to make 
the best of the hours left them, leasers paid miners a dollar an hour for 
six-hour shifts. Normally there are nearly 3000 miners at work in Goldfield 
district and the camp pays wages and salaries aggregating a half million dol- 
lars per month. 

In every walk sf life the closing months and weeks and days of the 
outgoing year were strenuous in the extreme. If stock sales may be taken as 
a measure of public interest, the sage brush state held the center of the 
stage and Goldfield was her star performer. November was the banner 
month. The profits for her thirty days ran to fully $50,000,000. The offi- 
cial statements of the exchange, for the four weeks of November, show the 
month's sales of Nevada shares to have been valued at $4,370,211.90. The 
best week was that which ended November 10th with a record of $1,294,547.50. 
In a study of those figures there should not be lost sight of the fact that 
every week there was an enormous curb trade and a vast vending of unlisted 
securities, which figures are impossible to obtain or even to estimate and 
which do not go to swell the total of those quoted. 

Two stock exchanges will be doing business in Goldfield from New 
Year's day henceforth. The Goldfield Mining Stock Exchange was organized 

(Continued to Page 15) 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER. 



CALIFORNIA'S RESERVE SUPPLY 

it Liberty to dii 
at tli< vera! months tn the oil fields of 

let* rmioing, as possibU*, 

ill*- said oil fields. The report 
blication in its entirety- in fact, it is t.... volumi 

columns, bnl the hove courteously 

or the Pacific Mining A <nl Reporter which 
particularly interesting, and which draws some very plausible 
ird to the available oil supply in the 
In tin* compual report only the actually proven areas have beoii 

o allowance being made for any ^r.:i t extei 
articularly in the Coalings Field, is extremely possible. 
In order to make the estimates extremely safe and conservative, only one 
half of the average thickness of the oil Bands has been reckoned. Of the 
■ is one-half has been considered as being permani 
the sand, only the remaining half has been considered - 
from this remaining half another division has been made, on 
■ it' thereof being considered as readily extractable. In other words, onl; 
t the actual oil content has been taken as being readily exti 
[( is, therefore, from this most conservative estimate of area, thirkn-. - 
■ < one-eighth oil content that the following table lias been comprint, 
which, in If explanatory: 

Proven Average Barrels of 

Productive Thickness of Original Oil 

Oil D Ana. Acres Sand, in feet Extractabl i 

u.ern River 6,000 L5€ 590,000,'j"0 

Midway 2,840 50 7l.niHi.iriM 

McKittrick 480 150 t5,000, I 

inga, East Side 4,180 75 197,000,00'J 

Coalings, West Side 11,140 50 351,000,000 

Total 1,254,000,000 

Amount of oil already extracted 112,000,000 

Amount of oil remaining in ground 1,142,000,000 



forced into the dome by the water below. That 
ago, and all agreed thai the contents of this particular 
ascertained by the simple reckoning oi 

saturation thereof. And as :ii>.»\- d thai there was a 

barrels of oil to be taken from the Kern River field. 

Now, where lias all of this great quantity of • » i I goncf h certainly has 
■ l thi> laws of nature and 
neither has it evaporated. Nor baa there been a tenth pari of M pum] 

. i . ■ ■ ■ 

water in the Kern field and pronounced it dying, d< buried. 

As a mattei ol Cacl the Kern River field will doubtless be 
producer of oil after the present generation have gone to their <■ 
Hut water must also be pumped. Recenl tests have shown that well 
stantly pumped do not make very much water while others thai havi b 

down for some time make much more. Where the water comes Prom i ■■ ■ 

can accurately tell. Doubtless Bome of il comes from the underlying strata, 
into which BeveraJ wells have been drilled and nol plugged, while more i 
from an upper water stratum, following the casing of certain wells -low. 
ii il Band, the hydrostatic pressure forcing it into the oil sand with the oil. 

But the oil is yel there and will stay there until it is taken out thrOUgl 

wells put down for that purpose. Cl water must be pumped with the oil in 
order to get the latter, that is a drawback and a misfortune, inasmuch as it 
will increase the cost of production. Whoever says the Kern River field is a 
thing of the past is either a "knocker" or is not sufficiently intelligent to 
grasp the situation. 



SANTA MARIA FIELD 



Its Retrospective and Prospective Position. 

Santa Maria oil field has, perhaps, made, greater strides in many respects 
than any other district in the state. While the actual field development 
has progressed slowly, only a comparatively small number of wells having 
been finished, the completion of two pipe lines in addition to two others 
existing the first of the year, and still two more about to be constructed, puts 
this most important oil field immediately in possession of adequate trans- 
portation for its entire product without having to call upon the railways 




General View of ihe Ken Riv 



Field 



It will be noted that the figures in the above table call for a productive 
capacity of about 52,000 barrels per acre. The old Chanslor-Canfield territory 
in the Coalinga field (not included in the present estimate) with its com- 
paratively shallow thickness of sand, has produced considerably over 100,01)0 
barrels to the acre in the past ten years, and is yet a valuable producing 
property. The old Los Angeles City field, with a lesser sand thickness than 
the average herein considered, has yielded above 65,000 barrels to the acre 
in fourteen years and is yet producing some oil. 

The present combined runs irom the San Joaquin Valley fields, which 
form the subject of the present estimate, is about 60,000 barrels daily, or 
22,000,000 barrels per annum. At this rate of output the fields should have 
a life of at least fifty years. 

No account of the Coast or Southern fields has, as yet, been taken, bur., 
with their largo known areas, great thickness of sands (especially in the Santa 
Maria field) and large oil content, there is little doubt, but that they will have 
equally as long a life and probably a greater comparative output. There is 
every reason to believe that the output of oil from the known California fields 
could readily be maintained at 50,000,000 barrels a year for at least fifty years. 
The above report is particularly interesting wherein it relates to the future 
production of the Kern River field. Many have been led to believe that its 
life as a producer of oil would be of very brief duration. The fact that mai y 
of the wells in this field pump a great deal of water has led some to suppose 
that there is nothing left in the field but water, but a little reflection should 
dispel such a theory. When the Kern River field was developed, many 
geologists of note made very careful estimates of the probable production of 
the field. The most conservative placed it at over a billion of barrels. They 
pointed out that the productive area is a dome — an inverted bowl, as it 
were — sloping on all sides. The limits of the field were early determined by 
drilling. Operators soon knew that within a certain oval shaped area there 
was oil — beyond its limits in the same formation was water. Between the tun, 
also in the same formation was both water and oil — in other words, certain 
wells drilled near the limits of the fields produced part oil and part water. 
It took no philosopher to see that the oil (always at the top of the wa1 r) 



The great refinery at Oil Port, the increased number of tank steamers, and 
the assurance of a steady demand for the entire production of the field to 
fill recent contracts made with Japanese companies, with the Nitrate com- 
panies in Chili, and for the Eastern market through the Panama pipe line, 
put Santa Maria in first importance of all of the oil fields of the state. 

A year ago saw the Santa Maria field in a somewhat unenviable position. 
While it had been fully proven to be one of the most remarkable producing 
territories it lacked that one thing necessary to successful development, i. e., 
transportation, and the Standard Oil Company, with its usual cupidity, had 
evidently already fully planned to gobble up the cream of the production. 
With its S-inch pipe line just completed, with practically no railroad facilities 
for shipping, and with no independent outlet, it seemed to have the situation 
well within its grasp. It had never before been thwarted — this spoiler of 
the oil fields — and as surreptuously as the thief in the night it laid its plans 
to tie up the output of the field. This was just the chance it had been looking 
for; was just the oil it wanted for refining. It could be cheaply transported 
by pipe line and tank steamers to its refineries. It was a snap of the first 
magnitude. 

The first step, after supplying itself with transportation facilities, was 
to convince the producers that the production was worthless and that it. 
the Monopoly, was really acting as a beuefaetor in entering the field at 
all. It built 320,000 barrels of tankage capacity and gave out the word that 
it supposed it would have to fill this, and much more, with 22|^> c. oil. Then 
it cut the price to 22V_> c. on daily runs, made two or three small 
at a slightly better figure, and set down to await the flocking of the other 
producers to offer their production at any price. And it is still waiting. 
The bottoms of its storage tanks have never been wet with oil, and it has 
never been enabled to secure enough oil to tax its 8-ineh pipe [in 
than a fifth of its capacity. And it will soon get much U-ss. We know 
of two or three contracting companies that positively will not renew their 
nearly expired contracts with the Standard under the nefarious terms 
of its usual contracts — -which forbid the selling of any part of tie 
duction to any other company — leaving price aside altogether. A barbed 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL EBPOETER. 



wire fence may mark the boundary lines of a lease, but it will not determine 
the boundary lines of the oil stratum. When your neighbor sticks a well 
down just across the line and pumps it for all it is worth, draining yours 
as well as his own lease; when the Standard Oil Company has tied you up 
to a contract that only takes a part of your production and forbids you 
selling to others, and you cannot pump your wells because you have no dis- 
position for the product, it is then that your eyes open with knowledge of 
a trickery that has built up one of the greatest existing monopolies at the 
cost of thousands of prosperous oil companies scattered over the entire country. 

The early history of the Santa Maria field has been told in the columns of 
this publication on a previous occasion. We will not repeat it more than to 
state that A. W. McKay was the pioneer, and that the Western Union and 
Pinal were the pioneer oil companies. We do this to dispel several erroneous 
reports to the contrary. Th Graciosa was not the pioneer in the field, but 
it was the pioneer for independence. To this company and to its courageous 
shareholders belongs great credit for a movement that has set the pace, as 
it were, for many a compan}"- that might, otherwise, continue to be dominated 
by the Rockefeller millions. 

The Graciosa Oil Company completed its first well nearly three years 
ago at a cost of little less than $50,000. Several of the larger stockholders 
had put practically every dollar they had into the enterprise. When they 
got a 400-barrel well and were offered 75c a barrel for the same, the contract 
calling for 100,000 barrels. In the meantime the company commenced the 
drilling of more wells. By the time the 100,000-barrel contract had expired 
the company was in a position to deliver a much greater quantity of oil. 
The Standard wanted to make a new contract calling for only a specified 
quantity, the Graciosa to agree to sell to no other company. The negotiations 
never got as far as price, for the Monopoly was candidly told that it could 
not do business on any such lines. Tne Graciosa wells were capped and the 
company set about the formulation of an independent enterprise which has 
had a signal success from its very inception. 

"It took nerve," said a Graciosa director, "to refuse a contract that 
meant $1,000 a day to the company, but we knew the value of our product, 
the producing capacity of our wells and the enormous possible 
earning capacity of our lease. We did not feel like 'picking hen's 
eyes, when we could just as well have the whole hen'." 

Local and English capital was immediately interested in the Graciosa 
Oil Company, and a gigantic project carried through which resulted in the 
incorporation of the ' ' California Petroleum Refineries Limited" and the 
"Coast Oil Transport Company," which affiliated companies, together with 
the Graciosa Oil Company, provide for the producing, transportation and 
refining of the output of one of the richest properties in this, or any other 
country. 




AGei 



al Vic 



of iheG; 



and Western Union Oil Companies' Properties, Santa Maria 



Graciosa Oil Company. 

The Graciosa property consists of 7,539 acres known as the Harris 
Ranch. To date eight wells have been completed with a large production. 
Two more wells are drilling, lumber is on the ground for three new rigs, 
and lumber ordered for still five more. Within a very short time ten wells 
will be drilling on this property which, when completed, will doubtless 
bring the production of the Graciosa to an amount greater than that of any 
other single property in this country. 

An average of 1,100 feet of oil producing stratum is encountered on 
this property assuring an unusual permanency to the wells. The first well 
drilled, as we have said before, produced 400 barrels daily from the start. 
It was producing full 400 barrels daily at the end of nearly a year's time 
after filling the 100,000 barrel contract. With this great body of oil stratum, a 
light gravity of oil, and an assured market, a more attractive oil proposition 
would be hard to conceive. 

Coast Oil Transport Company. 

The eight-inch pipe line of the Coast Oil Transport Company has just 
been completed and should be running oil within the .next few days. It 
has a capacity of 25,000 barrels daily, runs entirely by gravity from the 
wells to the refinery or on board vessels at the wharf, not a pump being 
required for any purpose. As all of the wells of the company flow naturally, 
the pipe line may be said to connect the great reservoirs in old mother 
earth with the outlet at tide-water. A record in pipe lying was accomplished 
by this company. Prom the wells of the Graciosa Company to the refinery 
at Oil Port it is 34 miles. The work of trenching, screwing and laying the 
pipe, and covering same, has occupied 70 days. As soon as the tests are made 
the line is now ready to commence the transportation of oil. It is believed 
that the first runs will have been made by the time this article is published. 
The tank steamer "Catania," recently purchased by the company, has already 
rounded the Horn on its way from the Atlantic, and will soon be ready to 
take on oil at the wharf which is nearing completion. Other boats will be 
added to the fleet in the near future and the work of supplying the contracts 
with Japan will commence. 

Californian Petroleum Refineries Limited. 

Work is progressing rapidly on the refinery of the Californian Petroleum 
Refineries Limited, at Oil Port. Foundations for the greater part of the 
buildings have been laid, and much of the masonry is well under way. Tanks, 
stills, and other paraphenalia is being installed, the continuous dm of the 



air-hammers being almost deafening. It is thought that the refinery will 
be ready for the first run about mid-summer next. It will have an initiary 
capacity of 7,000 barrels daily. 

Dr. Gregourez is in charge of the construction work, and has ably laid 
the foundation for the second refinery in the west in size and the first in 
equipment and efficiency. The only larger refinery on the Pacific Coast is 
the Standard's great plant at Point Richmond, which, however, is said to be 
inferior to this new plant. In the first place the refinery site at Oil Port 
is one of the ideallest to be found. If it had been created to order it could 
not have been better suited for this purpose. It has a gradual slope to the 
water front which will permit the oil to gravitate from the tanks through the 
various plants and thence on board ships at the end of a 3,600-foot pier 
which is now being constructed. A trolley line will also connect the refinery 
with the wharf. The entire plant will be electric lighted and will possess 
every convenience for the carrying on of the work. About 100 men will 
be employed in the various departments. The initiary capacity will be 
7,000 barrels daily, but the plant is so laid out that its capacity can be readily 
doubled at will by simply adding more stills. All of the usual products will 
be refined at this plant which will be placed in the competitive market on 
merit alone. 

Santa Maria Oil and Transportation Company. 

Recenting the tactics of the Standard Oil Company, and looking for a 
chance to get a reasonable profit from the oil business, a number of Santa 
Maria producing oil companies have recently organized the "Santa Maria 
Oil & Transportation Company," which will, it is said, shortly commence 
the construction of a pipe line to a wharf site near Pismo. It is the inten- 
tion of the company to construct a wharf some 1,500 feet long and to purchase 
tank steamers to transport the crude, entering the competitive market with 
its production. 

The companies interested in the new project are said to have a daily 
production of about 20,000 barrels, and embrace practically the entire output 
of the field with the exception of the Graciosa, Union, and Western Union 
companies. 

The project, if carried through, will result in a practical boycot of all 
marketing companies in that field. The producers claim, and justly so, that 
they cannot afford to submit to the unfavorable conditions of the contracts 
they are asked to enter into and prefer to engage their own capital in an 
enterprise in which they have unbounded faith. "Standard Oil cannot buy 
Gods sea or sky," said a producer recently. "We will pipe-line our produc- 
tion to tide-water, purchase a couple tank steamers, and proceed to sell our 
production. We have sounded the market and find that we can sell all 
of our oil at a good price if we ean guarantee delivery — in fact, the majority 
of consumers prefer to patronize an independent company. ' ' 

There is an unlimited field in the oil business. The companies that have 
their own production and provide themselves with facilities for marketing it 
will predominate in the future of this, one of the stato 's greatest industries. 
Brookshire Oil Company. 

Brookshire Oil Company owns in fee 393 acres of land adjoining the Pinal 
and other producing properties. To date five wells have been drilled, one 
of which is a good water well, the other four being numbered among the 
field's largest producers. One well is now drilling. The company has 200,000 
barrels of oil stored in reservoirs which flowed from its gusher before it 
could be brought under control. 

Dome Oil Company. 

The Dome Oil Company is another Santa Maria corporation that is making 
good progress in this field. It owns in fee 73 acres of land which has been 
absolutely proven by the wells of Pinal, Union, and Rice Ranch on three 
sides. To date two wells are producing, one drilling, and one new derrick up. 
The company has 10,000 barrels of oil in storage tanks. 




A General View of the Sanla Maria Field from Mount Pinal 

Pinal Oil Company. 

The Pinal Oil Company owns in fee 432 acres of land in the heart of the 
Santa Maria oil field. To date 13 wells have been drilled, three are drilling, 
and there are three new derricks up. The gravity of the oil is about 26 
degrees. The company owns jointly with the Brookshire about ten miles of 
pipe line. There is about 20,000 barrels of oil in storage on the property. 
The stock of this company is mostly held by Santa Maria capitalists, J. P. 
Goodwin, who is superintendent of this as well as the Dome and Brookshire 
properties, being one of the larger stockholders in the three companies. 

The Pinal company ~as one of the two most complete oil field camps to 
be found in California. It is ideally situated and has been constructed with 
a view of comfort and economy. It has spacious buildings for various pur- 
poses, running water, and even a garage for the accommodation of the several 
automobiles owned by the various officers of the company, in one of which 
the writer was recently conveyed through the field, the guest of Mr. Goodwin. 

Steam for power is generated by gas fuel on the three affiliated properties. 
Water for all their operations is produced from one well on the property of 
the Brookshire company. The companies are at present delivering some oil 
to the Standard Oil Company but will, it is understood, provide for their 
own transportation and sale of oil at no distant date. 



PACIFIC MINING & oil. REPORTER. 



9 



Western Union Oil Company. 

ga K It on which 

n drilled, twenty three 

been abandoned on account of 

time only 5.5(H) barrels is being produced, 

equally by the Associated and Standard the light 

■ the latter and the heavy oil. the »- r» t i r«. production of heai 

nn ii. ■ The heavy oil is produced from Bevcral 

■hallow wells which were tin- first ones drilled by the company before it was 




Refinery .nd Wh.rt o( Olilornion O.I Refineries. Limiied. »i Oil Porl 

known that there was a deep light-oil formation. Three wells are drilling 
on this property, and tin-re are about 50,000 barrels of oil in storage. Mr. 
A. tele is the superintendent having had almost continuous charge of the 
since tin- incorporation of the company. 

Bice Ranch Oil Company. 

Bice Kaneh Oil Company is operating on a 40 acre tract of land adjoining 

tome, Union and Xew Pennsylvania. The property is owned in fee simple. 

Two good producing wells have been developed, and No. 3 is drilling. It is 

said that tlie production is about 2,000 barrels daily. The gravity of the oil 

is L's degrees. Derrick is up for No. 4. 

Pennsylvania Petroleum Company. 

The Pennsylvania Petroleum Company is operating on a 60-acre lease 
just east of the Rice Ranch Oil Company. One well has been drilled to a 
depth of U . 7 ' h ' feet and is in oil, with every indication that a good producer 
will soon be brought in. 

Anglo-California Oil Syndicate, Limited. 

This company is just commencing operations on the Packard Anticline 
which is a portion of the Packard Estate, from which it was purchased. Der- 
rick is up for well No. 1 and it will spud in soon. 
Claremont Oil Company. 

The Claremont Oil Company is drilling a well on a lease west of the proven 
Santa Maria field. Although it has reached a depth of 3,500 feet no favorable 
formation has been encountered. 

Newlove Oil Company. 

The Newlove Oil Company was recently incorporated to acquire and 
develop the famous Newlove ranch in the heart of the Santa Maria field. 
This property composes 2,945 acres of absolutely proven territory and is 
the largest single piece of oil land known to be productive. It is practically 
surrounded by the producers. At the present time five wells are drilling 
mii the Newlove and one new derrick up. All possible speed will be exercised 
in the development of this property. Inasmuch as the controlling interest 
of this stock is in the hands of the Union Oil Company, a ready market is 
assured. It will take years to develop the Newlove property. 
Union Oil Company. 

The Union Oil Company of California owns nearly 75,000 acres of land in 
the Santa Maria field, a great part of which is known to be productive. This 
company is the largest individual producer of oil in this country; marketing 
and shipping its own product in a competitive market. While it owns a 
large acreage in all of the oil fields of the state, its 75,000 acres in Santa 
Maria comprises its largest, holdings, and, beyond a doubt, its most valuable. 

In tin Santa Maria field the Union Oil Company has about 40 producing 
wells with tin average production of several hundred barrels daily. About 
\- wells are drilling, including those of the Newlove oil Company which is 
controlled by the Union. The development of its property will continue 
vigorously during the coming year. 

The Union Oil Company owns a 0-inch pipe line from its wells in the 
Santa Maria field to the wharf of the Pacific Coast S. S. Company where its 
fleet of tank steamers take on their cargos. A second line, S-ineh pipe, will 
soon be commenced and will doubtless be completed by mid-summer. Rights 
of way have been secured and the pipe has already been discharged at. Port 
Harford. 

Coblentz Oil Company. 

This lease is operated by Frank Hall of the Hall & Hall Company. The 
property is located on the Pinal anticline. The first well is now 1,600 feet 
drilling in shallow formation. A series of accidents has delayed operations 
but there is reason to believe that work will now progress satisfactorily. 

Hall & Hall. 

This firm is operating on a fifty-acre tract of land on the Pinal anticline 
and adjoins the Keiser lease of the Union Oil Company. One well has been 
completed and a second is drilling. The production of this lease which 
amounts to about 500 barrels daily is being taken by the Standard Oil Com- 
pany on daily runs. 

Santa Barbara Oil Company. 

The Santa Barbara (California) Oil Company, composed of English and 
California capitalists, have commenced building a derrick three miles west 



of Lot OUvaS. The) are located on the summit of a dome which shows 
numerous indications of oil where tin- same is eut by Canyoi 

Laguna Land Company. 

Tins company was r it t \ ii rporated bj several • I ,. Union 

Sugar C pan] which has a refin. r\ at I'.ett.ravia and is particularly 

anxious to secure a supplj of fuel ml i. i- operating on al ... \v. 

Stowe, seven miles north of Santa Maria, on Suey Crci It. This is in virgin 
territory and a wild cat proposition. The first well is now about 

.ml drilling in blue clay having passed through nearly that thickness 
..f wat.r formation ami wash. Surface indications an- fair! 

the outcome of the venture is looked forward to with .on. i.. crest. 

A Mr. Talbot is superintendent . 

Palmer Oil Company. 

This company is operating about five miles .asi of Hi.. Mount Pinal 

hi., on what is known as the Blochmnn farm. It is compos, ..I of eastern 

Capital, being an. let- the direct supervision of E. I'!. Henderson. tin,. V erv 

,1 reducing well has recently been brought in. The formation .losel'v 

resembles that of the Pinal anticline, but the oil is somewhat heavier being 

.ii.. mi is degrees gravity, it is conservatively estimated thai the well will 
flow from 7HO to 900 barrels daily, 

This strike in new territory has created no little interest and many leases 
have been secured on adjoining property for several miles around. Several 
wells will lie drilled ill the near vicinity at once. To the I'almer eoinpnnv 
goes the credit of opening up a great extension of the Santa Maria field. 

Anglo-California Oil Syndicate. 
This company is operating on a 1500-acre lease from the Packard estate 
on the Packard anticline. It is an English corporation. Preparations are 
being made to commence the first well, derrick already being erected. The 
property has been very favorably reported upon and good results are antic- 
ipated. 

Recruit Oil Company. 
The Recruit Oil Company has been an extensive wild-catter in the Santa 
Maria field with varying success. At the present time it has one well down 
about 3,000 feet on the Escolle lease and has encountered a good body of 
oil sand that gives promise of making a producer. The company has one 
half of the production of the California Coast property, the other half going 
to the Union Oil Company. 

California Coast. 

Controlled jointly by the Union and Associated oil companies, each 
getting a half of the production. At the present time three wells are pro- 
ducing and one drilling. 

Los Alamos Oil & Development Company. 

Has one producing well on the Lompoc anticline. Sells its production 
to the Union Oil Company. 

Following is the present status of operations in the Santa Maria field: 

Producing Drilling New rigs. 

Anglo California Oil Syndicate 1 

Brookshire 4 I 

California Coast (Associated & Union) 3 1 

Claremont \ 

Coblentz i 

Dome 2 1 1 

Graciosa ,8 2 3 




eti and Union Oil Compen.ei 



Hall Sz Hall 1 

Los Alamos O. & D. Co 1 

Laguna Land Company 

Newlove 

Pennsylvania Petroleum Co 

Palmer 1 

Pinal 13 

Recruit 

Rice Ranch 2 

Southern Pacific 1 

Santa Barbara Oil Co 

Western T'uion 23 



, S ,t . M.i 
1 



10 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER. 



Union — . 

Keiser lease 3 

Escolle lease 3 

Fox lease 5 

Eefson lease 3 

Hobbs lease 9 

Hill lease 3 

Folsom lease 7 

Burton lease 1 

S. M. 0. & G. Co 5 

Purissima 8 

Hartnell 2 

Total Union Oil Company 49 

Total of field 157 



1 
1 
1 
1 


1 


1 




(5 


] 


5 


13 




[ (he Brookshire Oil Company, Sanlo Moria 



THE COALINCA FIELD 



Back in the early eighties, long before the discovery of oil in the Coalinga 
oil field, a man by the name of Labrange came out from Virginia, where he 
had spent several years drilling -with rather indifferent success. Soon after 
he arrived a man came to him with a mining scheme which he thought would 
pay well if he only had a way to get the saids from a certain creed bed rn 
Merced county. Mr. LaGrange agreed to obtain the sands for him and worked 
on the prospect more or less of the time for several months. While there he 
went to his trunk one day and in taking out some things accidentally broke 
a bottle of the oil that he had brought from the eastern fields. A workman 
who was standing nearby asked what it was and when told that it was petro- 
leum oil seemed very much interested. That night ae called upon Mr. LaGrange 
and told him that he knew where there was indications of a large amount of 
the same kind of oil and that if he would go with him he would show him 
where it was. 

About two years later they started from Huron with provisions for a trip 
of several days. They camped the first night near where the Home Oil Com- 
pany later put down its wells. They found the prospects so favorable that, 
after getting back to Huron, they tried to organize a company to drill a 
well, but few seemed willing to take chances on a scheme that seemed to great 
a speculation and the project was finally abandoned. 

Eight years later Mr. C. A. Canfieiu started his first well in that part of 
the Coalinga field known as "Oil City," which was greeted as a foolish un- 
dertaking and very little money could be raised to cover the expense of 
drilling. It is stated as an actual fact that Mr. Canfield was often compelled 
to gather sage brush with which to fire his boiler. But in the face of all these 
obstacles the well progressed, and in a comparatively short time was brought 
in, insuring success to Mr. Canfield and the other promoters. 

Stock that had been selling for a pittance rose to fabulous prices. It is 
understood that Mr. Canfield at one time sold 30,000 shares of his stock in 
the Company for no less than $150,000 or $5.00 a share on a par value ">f 
$1.00. Fortunes were made in a few days and people flocked in from nil 
sides locating land for miles around. The stock of any company organised 
to operate in the Coalinga field was always salable at a good price. At that 
time the oil brought $1.75 per barrel at the wells and was often hauled away in 
tank wagons and considered a cheap fuel even at that high figure. 

From this time on the development of the field has been comparatively 
rapid. At first the "Oil City" pool was developed, operations branching out 
from here gradually, following, for the most part, near the outcroppings of 
well defined oil formations. By the year 1902 the output of the field had 
reached the modest amount of 500,000 barrels and unlimited capital was at 
hand for the further development of what promised to be the greatest oil 
producing field in this country. 

Then came the Standard under the mask of ''Pacific Coast Oil Company" 
and the price of oil commenced to decline rapidly finally reaching the "low 
water" mark of 18 cents per barrel for contract oil and even less for daily 
runs. This was about two years ago and will probably go on record as being 
the lowest price ever paid for California oil. 

But the majority of the producers were familiar with Standard Oil tactics. 
Many of them had operated in the Eastern fields where the Monopoly had 
held full sway and they knew that they could expect no mercy in its hands. 



With the first law of nature in mind they commenced the only effective rem- 
edy, curtailment, by shutting down their wells and ceasing drilling. As Coal- 
inga had been no exception in low prices it was aided by a similar movement 
in the other fields of the state with the result that drilling was discontinued 
almost altogether and the productive wells of the state shut down to the 
extent of at least 25 per cent of their capacity. Several combinations of com- 
panies was made and a general movement for independence was inaugurated. 

The result has been telling. It has practically driven the Standard from 
the fuel business of the state and it is stated on good authority that it is 
experiencing the greatest difficulty in securing sufficient light oil to keep its 
refinery at Point Richmond in operation. The Associated by contract and by 
purchase of land has protected itself for its present requirements but is in the 
market for more oil at constantly increasing prices. 

The present status of the Coalinga field shows a remarkably prosperous 
condition. The few wells drilled during the past two years extended the limits 
of the oil field beyond the greatest expectation of the most sagnine. To tho 
east more than a mile in width and a strip over six miles in length has been 
added to the proven territory. While to the south practically a township, or 
over 23,000 acres has been added to the probable productive field. 

The company to which credit is due for this latter addition is the Lucile. 
It was started with a small capital by local oil men, and is, beyond doubt, 
the record for cheap drilling. Many of the drilling crew took their pay in 
stock in the company. The officers devoted their time without compensation, 
and many of the bills for supplies were paid for in stock. Very few of the 
shares were sold to the general public. Three hundred feet of very prolific 
oil sand was encountered at 2,800 feet which proves conclusively that tho 
productive area in the locality is very extensive. This well came in a gusher 
and has produced 700 barrels daily since it was completed, some four months 
ago. The credit for the extension of this territory goes to R. W. Dallas, S. It. 
Bowen, and other local oil men of Coalinga. 

Notwithstanding the already enormous area of the Coalinga field, which, 
together with the average thickness of the oil sands makes it the greatest 
oil field in the San Joaquin Valley, there is every reason to believe that its 
productive area has hardly been determined. In the north, south and east 
lies almost positive oil sand, while to the west sand after sand outcrops in 
uniform regularity until the Coast is reached. With higher prices for nil 
extensive wild-catting will again be in vogue which will, beyond a doubt, 
open up extensions to the field now thought to be as barren as was Section 
Seven when Bob Smith started his first well there and which later yielded 
him 45,000 barrels monthly for several years. 

PRESENT STATUS OF COMPANIES. 

The present status of the oil companies operating in the Coaling field 
is as follows: 




Gusher of ihc California Monarch Oil Co., in lhe Coalinga Field 

ALL IN TOWNSHIP 19, RANGE 15. 

Aetna Petroleum Company, 500 acre,s in Section 30-19-15. Mr. A. J. 
Graham, Superintendent. One producing well. 

Arline Oil Company — 320 acres in Section 26-19-15. T. A. Turner, Super- 
intendent. Two producing wells. 

Avon Oil Company — 320 acres in Section 14-19-15. Daniel Finn, Super- 
intendent. Two producing wells, one drilling-down 1200 feet in 10-inch casing. 

Call Oil Company — 40 acres in Section 32-19-15. J. W. Livermore, Super- 
intendent. One well drilled in and shut down. 

California Diamond Oil Company — 60 acres in Section 31-19-15. A. B. 
Canfield, Superintendent. One producing well and one drilling well. 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER. 



11 



California Diamond Oil Company—; - tion 1S-1S-1S. \. U 

■ I drilling, down 1900 feel in 10-ineh easing. 
California Oilfields Limited— i. - - i Sections 13-19-1 1 and 9.15.19 81. 

rintendent. Forty-three producing wells, 
well drilling to tie icrrieks up. 

Caribou Oil Mining Company— Inn acrea in Beetlou 29-19 IS. Paul Hunaeh, 
■ nt. Ten producing wells, one well deepened and perforated casing 
irell .hist spudded In. 
California Monarch Oil Company. — ISO acre* in Section 31 19 18 A. B. 

wells prodneing. 
California Monarch Oil Company— 160 acres in Section 26-19 15. \. B. 
Id, Superintendent. One well jusi brought in. This well is doing by 
actual i barrels daily and will probably In- a 1,000-barrel well as 

taelf from sand. This opens up ■ vast territory to the 
of the proven Seld and the company is deserving of much credit in iis per 

see in putting down its well in the fare of many obstacles. 

Coalinga Oil Company— H'.n aeres in Section 20-19-15. J. II. Miller, Super 
intendent. Thirteen prodneing wells. 

Coalinga Peerless Oil Company— lfin aeres in Section 22-19-15. E. T 
Williams. Superintendent Eleven producing wells. 

Confidence Oil Company —160 aeres in Section 31-19-15. Frank Cleary, 
Superintendent. Thirteen wells producing. 

Commercial Petroleum Company — 60 aeres in Section 31-19-15. C. Prieden- 
berg, Superintendent Bight producing wells. 

Forty Oil Company — 10 acres in Section 34-19-15. Two wells producing, 
on., derrick up. 

Hanford Oil Company— IGn acres in Section 28-19-15. W. Thrall. 
intenuVnt. Seven wells prodneing. 

Home Oil Company — sn aeres in Section 20-19-15. W. A. Gray, 
intendent. Seven wells producing. 

Independence Oil Company — 40 aeres in Section 28-19-15. T. J. 
Superintendent Nine, wells prodneing. 

Kaweah Oil Company — 320 acres in Section 14-lil-lo. T. .1. Turner, Super- 
intendent. Two wells producing, 

Kern Trading & Oil Company — 200 aeres in Section 31-19-15. H. G. Bender, 
Superintendent. Three wells producing. 

McCreary Oil Company — 4o aeres in Section 34-19-15. W. P. Kerr, Super- 
intendent. One well drilling. 



Super 
Super- 
Turner, 



ALL IN TOWNSHIP 20. RANGE 15. 

Coalinga Pacific Oil Company- 10 seres in Section 7 20 15. B. 
Superintendent Poui producing wells. 

Esperanza Oil & Gas Company 160 acres in Section 6-20-15. II. 0. 
Anderson. Superintendent. Seven wells producing, one derrick up. 

Inca Oil Company —160 acres in Section 24-20-14. R. C. Baker. Super- 
intendent. Foul producing wells, one drilling. 

Mercantile Crude Oil Company — (0 acres in Section 6 20 15. W. s. Pi 

Superintendent. Four producing w . I I 

M. K. & T. Oil Company— ion acres in Section 8-20 15. D. M. DuLong, 
Superintendent One well producing, o Irilling. The drilling ■-■ 

linislied as intended, will lie the targesl in the state. ll is D.OW ab 
feet in special 18-inch easing which is being used for the tirst string This 
will lie carried down to alioul 2,000 feet when a l.'i-incli casing will lie used 
through the oil sands. The handling of the big casing, which weighs 
pounds to the joint, is particularly- interesting. 

New San Francisco Crude Oil Company 40 acres in Section 6-20-15. 
P. Cleary. Superintendent, four wells producing and one well drilled in ami 
si aniling. 

Porter & Scribner — 120 acres in Section 7-20-15. B. i '. Baker, Super 
intendent. One producing well. 

S. W. & B. Oil Company — 10 acres in Section 6-20-15. B. .1. King, Super- 
intendent. Two wadls producing. 

W. K. Oil Company— ISO acres in Section 2-20-15, T. .1. Turner, Super- 
intendent. One well partially drilled. 

York Coalinga Oil Company — 40 acres in Section 6-20-15. II. Henshaw 
Superintendent. Two wells producing. 

ALL IN TOWNSHIP 21, RANGE 14. 
Commercial Petroleum Company — 160 acres in Section 12-21-14. r. 

I'm denberg, Superintendent. One well drilling, down 600 feet in 10-inch 
easing. 

Mt. Hamilton Land & Oil Company — 120 acres in Section 14-21-14. W. H. 
Kerr, Superintendent. One well drilling. 

West Coalinga Oil Company — 57 acres in Section 12-21-14. Z. L. Phelps, 
Superintendent. One well drilling, down about 60 feet. 

ALL IN TOWNSHIP 21, RANGE 15. 
Aladin Oil Company — 20 aeres in Section 6-21-15. Will commence drilling 




A Pari of Ihc Coolinea Field 



Missouri Coalinga Oil Company — 20 acres in Section 34-19-15. W. P. 
Kerr, Superintendent. One well producing. 

Montana Oil Company — 80 acres in Section 24-19-15. H. A. Kerns, Super- 
intendent. One well partially drilled and left standing. 

National Thirty (Associated) — 30 acres in Section 22-19-15. F. Marsh, 
Superintendent. Three wells producing, one well drilling and one derrick up. 

Northeastern Oil Company — 80 aces in Sec. 26-19-15. S. J. Kielly, Super- 
intendent. One well partially drilled and abandoned. 

Octave Oil Company — 160 acres in Section 22-19-15. M. P. Krotzer, Super- 
intendent. One well producing, one well drilled in and left standing. 

Oil City Petroleum Company — 280 acres in Section 28-19-15. S. J. Rielly, 
Superintendent. Eleven wells producing. 

Pittsburg Coalinga Oil Company — 10 acres in Section 34-19-15. W. P. Kerr, 
Superintendent. Two producing wells. 

Pittsburg Oil Company — 80 acres in Section 24-19-15. H. A. Kerns, Super- 
intendent. One well drilling, down 2,950 feet in 6-inch casing. 

Record Oil Company — 40 aeres in Section 22-19-15. P. Hunsch, Super- 
intendent. One producing well, one drilling well. 

Sauer Dough Oil Company — 30 acres in Section 22-19-15. Clarence Sperry, 
Superintendent. Seven wells producing. 

Stockholders Oil Company — 20 acres in Section 28-19-15. G. D. Roberts, 
Superintendent. Four producing wells, one drilling well, down 800 feet. 

Twenty-eight Oil Company — 120 acres in Section 28-19-15. S. J. Rielly, 
Superintendent. Fifteen wells producing. 

Twenty-two Oil Company — 40 acres in Section 22-19-15. R. Patterson, 
Superintendent. One well drilling, down 1,200 feet and work suspended. 

Westmoreland Coalinga Oil Company — 40 acres in Section 34-19-15. W. P. 
Kerr, Superintendent. Three wells producing. 

Wilcox, C. J. — Operating on the west 320 acres of Section 2-19-15. Three 
derricks up, will commence drilling at once. 



Esperanza Land & Oil Company — 700 acres in Section 30-21-15. W. H. Kerr, 
Superintendent. One well drilling. 

Lucile Oil Company — 40 acres in Section G-21-15. S. R. Adams, Super- 
intendent. One well producing. 

Manchester Oil Company — 285 aeres in Section 18-21-15. W. P. Kerr, 
Superintendent. One well drilling. 

Section Six Oil Company — 160 acres in Section 6-21-15. H. Henshaw, 
.Superintendent. Work will begin about the first of the year. 

Shreeves Oil Company — 37 acres in Section 6-21-15. J. P. Shreeves, Super- 
intendent. One drilling well, down 2,100 feet in 6-inch casing. 
ALL IN TOWNSHIP 19, RANGE 14. 

Thirty-six Oil Company (formerly Philadelphia-San Francisco and Red- 
ding) — Three wells abandoned on account of light production. 
ALL IN TOWNSHIP 20, RANGE 14. 

Blue Diamond Oil Company — 400 acres in Section 22-20-14 and 20 acres 
in Section 26-20-14. One well temporarily abandoned. 

Bunting & Brix Oil Company — 40 acres in Section 12-20-14. H. II. 
Superintendent. One producing well and one well [tartly finished, 
suspended. 

California & New York Oil Company — 10 acres in Section 12-20-14. 
Salisbury, Superintendent. Four producing wells, derrick up for No. 5. 

Caledonian Crude Oil Company — 20 acres in Section 26-20-14. R. \V. Dallas. 
Superintendent, Two wells being repaired. 

Cawdor Oil Company — 80 aeres in Section 26-20-14. R. W. Dallas, Super- 
intendent. One well producing. 

Coalinga Western Oil Company — 40 acres in Section 23-20-14. R. C. Baker, 
Superintendent. Five producing wells. 

Coalinga Petroleum Company — 80 acres in Section 14-20-14. R. C. Baker, 
Superintendent. Two wells producing, one well drilling. 

Cyprus Oil Company — 40 acres in Section 1-20-14. S. R. Bowen, Super- 
intendent. Two wells producing, will put down more wells the first of the year. 



Brix-, 
Work 



G. H. 



12 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER. 



Fresno-San Francisco Oil Company — 40 acres in Section 1-20-14. J. • W. 
Livermore, Superintendent. Four producing wells. 

Kern Trading & Oil Company has taken over the whole of Section 25-20-1 1 
and repaired up the old Cory and Canfleld wells, and two of as good wells 
as there is in the field have been brought in. Its property on Section 31 has 
been improved and a better production is being taken out than ever before. 

Penn Coalinga Petroleum Company — 40 acres in Section 1-20-14. H. Heu- 
shaw, Superintendent. Pour wells producing. 

Section Seven Oil Company — 20 acres in Section 12-20-14 and 40 acres in 
Section 7-20-15. H. Henshaw, Superintendent. Four producing wells, one 
derrick up. 

Shawmut Oil Company — 140 acres in Section 12-20-14. H. G. Anderson, 
Superintendent. Four producing wells. 

St. Paul-Fresno Oil Company — 120 acres in Section 23-20-14. Mr. Jackson, 
Superintendent. Two wells producing. 




Manhattan Consolidated and Manhattan Consolidated Annex Mines. Mnnhnth 



H, 



S. Davis, Super- 
T. J. Turner, Super- 



Union Oil Company — 160 acres in Section 13-20-14. 
intendent. Eight wells producing. 

Wabash Oil Company — 80 acres in Section 24-20-14. 
intendent. Seven wells producing. 

Zier Oil Company — SO acres in Section 1-20-14. Andrew Ferguson, Super- 
intendent. Six wells producing. Will probably drill two more wells before 
the first of June. These wells are shallow costong, very little to drill and 
produce a good amount of oil. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Michigan Oil & Development Company — Over 1,000 acres in the White 
Creek district. H. E. Crozier, Superintendent. One well drilling. 



KERN COUNTY OIL FIELDS 

Bakersfield, Cal., January 1st, 1907. 
Special Correspondence. 

For five years the oil industry in Kern County has not looked as bright 
as it does at the beginning of the year 1907. For the past four years the oil 
producers of Kern County have been producing oil, and all the profits of the 
industry has gone to the consumer of fuel oil, while the producer who has 
put his good hard cash and the best business methods possible into the business, 
has had a constant struggle to keep from losing all the money he has put 
into the business, and has had to use the greatest economy possible to keep 
from being thrown into bankruptcy on account of the low price that has 
prevailed. In the majority of instances the oil has been sold for actually less 
than the real cost of production. 

When the present price of 27% cents for a production of 7,000 barrels 
daily for 1907 was made with the Independent producers and 22 cents net for 
all the 900,000 barrels of last year 's production in storage, it showed conclusive- 
ly that the oil of Kern County is in demand and at a price more than that of 
actual cost of production. With three big marketing concerns in the field for the 
Independents oil with bids of 27%, 25 and 2iy 2 cents, all were satisfied that 
an era of better times had come. 

One of the marketing companies which failed to secure oil, made the 
statement to the Independents that before they would have let the oil get 
away from them they would have been willing to pay 35 cents for the 
storage oil and also that figure for the year's contract. This concern evidently 
thought the Independents would be satisfied with a slight advance over the 
last year's contract and did not for a moment think the men having charge 
of the sales department of the Independent Agency would have the nerve to 
hold out for what the oil was actually worth, and hoped bv bidding a slight 
advanced over last year's contract to secure control of this 1,140,000 barrels 
of fuel oil sold. 

The low price prevailing during the last year has not encouraged anv 
great amount of development work. Items of interest to the public interested 
in the oil business will be given in as full manner as possible. 

Early in the year of 1906, the Southern Pacific 's rifled pipe line between 
the Kern Elver field and Delano was finished and tested. In the month of 
February, the line was completed and the first batch of oil run through. 
All reports indicate that the line is a success in the fullest sense of the word, 
and that, whereas, the Standard Oil Co. through its line of S-inch plain pipe, 
with stations every 14 miles, has only been able to put through about 8000 
barrels daily under the most favorable conditions, this rifled line, with one 
station pumping 32 miles with the help of the water forced into it is enabled 
to put through 16,000 barrels in each day of 24 hours. 

For some reason unknown this line has been working but a portion of 
the time. Numerous breakdowns of pumps and equipment has kept the line 



idle the greater part of the time. It is safe to say that not one day out of 
ten has it been working. Whether on account of the line not being a full 
success, a scarcity of oil, or the line having proved a success and only intended 
as an experiment to test the capacity of a greater system of lines reaching 
to the bay, and idle until the time is ripe to carry out the greater schemes, no 
one outside of the Southern Pacific officials know. 
Development During 1906. 

On the extreme eastern edge of the Kern Eiver field, the Imperial and 
thirty-three oil companies have drilled between 20 and 25 new wells during 
the past year. These additional wells have only served to keep the production 
of the two companies up to their regular output of approximately 6500 barrels 
per day. The future intentions of these two companies are not known to 
the public. Whether they will endeavor to drill up some of their undeveloped 
territory and increase their production, or only develop in such manner as to 
keep their production up to its present standard is not known. 

The Water Supply Company, supplying water for the greater portion of 
the east and northern central part of the field, has recently enlarged its 
plant and installed new machinery so that the many costly shutdowns, that 
have been common during the past year will not occur during 1807. 

During the summer and fall of 1906, the Southern Pacific railway has 
assembled pipe, rigs, engines and all kinds of material necessary to drill 
over 75 new wells on its property, operated under the name of the Kern 
Trading and Oil Company. When it is taken into consideration that this many 
new wells represents almost 10 per cent of the total number of wells pump- 
ing oil in the Kern Eiver field, counting all that have been drilled during 
the last five years, it will be seen at once the magnitude of this new work and 
the faith the great Southern Pacific railroad has in the capacity of the Kern 
Eiver field to produce oil for some time to come. The material alone for 
this great work amounts to over 200 car loads or several trains loaded with 
nothing but material to drill new wells. All of this gigantic development 
work is at this writing shut down on account of the impossibility of securing 
lumber enough to finish the derricks. 

The Petroleum Development Company, supplying oil to the Santa Fe 
railroad, has drilled but a limited number of wells during the last year, 
not more than sufficient to keep its production up to the normal figure. 

The Union Oil Company of California 

The great competitor of the Standard Oil Company on the Pacific Coast, 
the Union Oil Company, of California, has at last entered the Kern Eiver 
field. The Union Oil Company made a bid both for the stored oil of the 
Independents and also for its production for the year 1907. It failed to 
secure this on account of the Associated making the highest bid. Nothing 
daunted, this Native Son of California Oil Company, which controls the 
major portion of the production of Southern California, at once made a con- 
tract with the West Shore Oil Company for 1,000,000 barrels of oil delivered 
during the next three years, (at least that is the amount given, and it is known 
they have bought some West Shore Oil), and proceeded to lay a pipe line from 
its reservoir to the West Shore property, passing through the property of the 
Black Jack, Alma, Alma Junior, and Kern Eiver Oil Companies and skirting 
that of the junction, California Kern, Four and Apollo and other companies 
along the route and making provision with connections so that any of these 
companies can at any time pump oil into the Union Oil Company's pipe 
with no more expense than putting their pumps to work 'on the Union's line. 

This certainly looks as if the Union Oil Company is in the Kern Eiver 
field with the intention of staying. Both the Four and Apollo Oil Companies 
have done no more work than necessary to keep up their production, both 
these companies, together with the Kern Eiver Oil Company, of Bakersfield, 
have contracts that do not allow any opportunity to do new development work 




: Gold Mines. Consolidated. Nevada County. Cal 



except at a loss. The West Shore Oil Company evidently in view of supplying 
the oil called for by the Union have commenced to develop at a great rate 
Four new wells are being drilled along the west line next to the Associated Oil 
Company and it is reported the company has intentions of developing its 
territory to the extent of 12 or 15 more new wells. 

Alma, Alma Junior, Black Jack and Knob Hill have done no new work 
during the year. The low price for oil has kept these conservative companies 
from drilling territory they might under better prices. 

California Kern has done no work with the exception of enlarging its 
refinery plant to accomodate the increased demand for refined products. 



PACIFIC MINING £ oil. REPORTER. 



13 



rcdri)Hng old wells to 
it.-r, which 
itod than in any 
part of ■ 

r.i roach the deep <>il sands supposed to underlay 

11 and his parinar, Fairbanks, have at last 

their laal well drilled to r depth of I s "" feel on the property 

■ ■ Oil Company leaae, and have sold all the material 

and machinery on the property. This is :i great blow to thus.- who have 

• I with admiration the splendid nerve of these people in the face of 

ntlv insurmountable obstacles in their endeavor to prove that a richer 

with lighter oil underlaid the heavy fuel oil of Kern River. 

100 they have drilled five wells in an 
attempt to reach the deep sand and have finally abandoned the 



GOLD 




!."- 




MonKannn-Ncvada Gold Mines, Mnnhatlsn. Nevada 

territory and will develop more promising oil lands in the vicinity of the Full- 
erton field, of Southern California. They take with them the best wishes 
of every operator in the Kern River field. 

The Peerless Oil Company lias drilled about 10 wells on its property during 
fhe past year. This company will drill a few more wells and then the necessity 
for new work will be over. It has kept its production up the regular rate of about 
4000 barrels daily and from now on the great Peerless property, which has 
produced more oil than any other property in the field, with the exception of 
the Imperial, may be expected to remain at practically a standstill. 

Sterling Oil Company's property has not been developed during the past 
year. The company has about forty acres of land that has never been 
drilled and should prove some of the best in the entrie field. The officers 
of- the Sterling have not seen how they could produce oil and develop new 
territory at a price of 20 cents or less. If they are assured 30 cents or more 
for their oil, there is no doubt but that the Sterling would drill up its present 
Undeveloped land. 

Soverign Oil Company, which leases from the Sterling, has all of its 
territory drilled up and during the past year has done nothing further than to 
operate the wells now drilled. 

Claremont and Illinois Crude Oil Companies also have all their territory 
drilled and have nothing to look forward to except an increase in price 
which will allow them to pay dividends. 

The Great Associated Oil Company has done no development work in the 
Kern field during the past year. Whether this is on account of being enabled 
to buy oil cheaper than they can produce it, or whether they prefer to save 
their great amount of undeveloped laud from drilling until such time as the 
other properties have been exhausted and get the cream of the business at 
the best price, or for some other reason, is not known. Sufficient to say, they 
have done no new work and show no signs of commencing even at the present 
market price of 27y 2 cents. 

The Sacramento Oil Company has drilled three new wells during 1906. 
Early in the year this company made a contract for 1.3,000 barrels per month 
at a price of 17 1 /^ cents and found it necessary to drill three wells in order 
to secure this production. aether the advance in the price will induce them 

to drill up more of their territory of which they have 40 acres, 20 of which 
has not been drilled, or whether they will follow the lead of the Associated 
and wait until the price reaches a higher figure before they drill, is not 
known. No activity is manifested on the Sacramento lease at the present 
time. 

The Linda Vista and Piedmont Oil Companies have both drilled one new 
well during the past year, but have not expressed themselves as to whether 
-7 ' ._. will induce them to drill during the coming year. 

Columbian Oil Company, tied up with a long time contract for 30 eta. has 
done mi more drilling than absolutely necessary to keep the production up to 
the amount- called for in the contract. 

Federal Oil Company composed of the Vesta, Lackawanna, Globe, En- 
terprise, .May. Aladin and others, under the management of A. H. Liscomb, 
has done no new work during the past year. When the prospects looked 
bright for the buyer of low priced oil, this company associated itself with 
the Producers Refining Company, controlling several refineries in the field, 
and protected itself against a slump in the market by agreeing to furnish the 
refineries with a certain amount of oil at a price that would allow them a 
profit over production. It is not. known if the present advance will induce 
this company, controlling a large acreage in the Kern River fie.d, to develop 
a greater amount of oil. The officers of the company say that they prefer 
to wait until the market is in a more settled condition and they know they 
will be able to move any oil sold before they go to the expense of new work. 
Refining Industry. 

Of all the improvement in the business allied with the production of oil, 
none is so noticeable as that of the refining business. Asphalt that six 



months :>_'<> was going begging at $6.00 per ton is now in demand at 
and contracts offered for an entire years production at the latter figure s«» 
far none of the refineries have tied themselves up, knowing 'ha? their asp hall 
is the DOS I in the world and that only a limited amount can possibly In manu 

trod. Knowing Hie market will DO ;> i to wait a few 

months especially as they are always able t" dispose <>t' thoii asphall a 
as manufactured at $12.00 or more per ton. 

The great increasi in the demand for engine and stove distillate, coupled 

witli the sacceaa during the last tun years in extracting lubrh - and 

initiating oils from the Kem River oil, has enabled the refineri 

a profit, a produet that formerly went hi wast.' ..i was Bold I" 1 he Standard 

panj to mix with the heavy <>ii for 15 cents :i barrel 

Standard Agrees to Enter Midway and McKittrick. 
The great standard nil Company lias made ;i bona fide offer to the pre 

(hirers of Midway and McKittriek for 5,000,000 barrels of "il at 25 Cent! 
barrel. The monopoly will put a pipe line into these fields l«» trs 
Oil. This proposition has been under consideration by the producers of these 
fields for the past 30 days, but at the present writing no definite conclusion 
has been reached. "Colonel Tim Spellacy, who holds a controlling interesl in 
the Mascot Oil Company, one of the best properties in the Midway field, with 
lour wells already drilled capable of producing 1000 barrels per day, and 
the Cresoeus oil Company, with one well, good, so report says for 200 to 500 
barrels per day, says that he will furnish 3,000,00 barrels nut of these proper 
ties and other undeveloped properties he controls if the other producers will 
agree to furnish the balance. 

Colonel Spellacy says he realizes that 25 cents a barrel is less than the 
oil is worth, but insomuch as they have been locked in for the past five years, 
and the railroads are not able to move the oil, as is evidenced by the thousands 
of barrels of Sunset oil that has been in the sump holes for the past year, all 
sold and only waiting transportation, he is willing to give the additional 
profit of his properties to secure transportation that will not be dependent on 
the whim or inability of the railroad in furnishing cars. 

Some of the producers of these fields are holding out for a better price 
and say that no matter what the transportation facilities are, the oil will be 
worth 3-3 cents in less than a year and they will not agree to sell a barrel 
unless they are guaranteed the latter price. What the outcome of the offer 
will be is hard to say. The mere fact of the Standard being willing to give 
25 cents shows the oil industry, while not on a boom, is in much better condi- 
tion than it has been at any time during the past five years. 

The producers of Midway and McKittrick can produce oil and make 
money at 25 cents a barrel. But they are satisfied that the oil will be worth 
more during the next year and some of them refuse to enter into any 25 
cent contract. 

Great Demand for Road Oil. 

Every barrel of the heavy road oil from 9 to 12 degrees gravity now 
stored in the sump holes at Sunset could be sold, and is sold at prices from 25 
to 35 cents per barrel, if the railroads would only furnish ears to move it. 
Any producer .n the Sunset field could, without any trouble get 50 cts. a barrel 
for his oil if he could agree to deliver it, but the same difficulty has been 
experienced for the past six months. The customers are willing to pay any 
price for the oil and the producers have the oil to sell, but the transportation 
companies either will not or cannot furnish the cars to move it. 

The close of 1906 sees over half a million barrels of road oil stored in 
the Sunset field all of whicu is sold and awaiting movement. 

No new work of magnitude has been done in the Sunset field. A few 
wells have been drilled. The Adiline Oil Company has brought in two good 
flowing wells, the Maricopa Oil Company two, the New Center one, the Snook 
company one. Numerous other companies would do development work in 
this field if the oil could be moved. 




Birds Eye View Empire Gold Mines. Lid.. Sierra County. Cal. 

The Midway Field. 

In this field no work has been going on during the last year with the 
exception of the Chanslor-Canfield Midway Oil Company, which was recently 
bought by the Santa Fe Railroad Company. Several test wells have been 
drilled during the last year, but no great amount of new work has been done. 
With one or two exceptions, all the wells drilled last year by this company 
have proven good ones. 

It is evuiently the intention of the Santa •■ e to provide itself with a 
supply of fuel oil for some years to come, but as long as they can buy Kern 
River Oil for 30 or 35 cents per barrel they will not develop the Midway 
property other than to determine that they will be able to secure a great 
amount of fine fuel oil when prices in other portions of the state have risen 
above the four bit mark, 



14 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER. 



McKittrick Still Idle. 

McKittrick has a great deal of good territory in its limits but the eternal 
car shortage has curtailed its production during the past year to a great ex- 
tent. Not a single new well has been drilled, with the exception of the Fear- 
less, which has a test well down 1900 feet without oil. Less than half of <iir. 
production sold the Associated Oil Company by the Kern Elver Oil Company, 
has been taken, while the Keller and Berry property and that of the San 
Francisco and McKittrick have been shut down. 

It is not known if the producers of the McKittrick field will agree to give 
the Standard their pro rata of the 5,000,000 barrels asked for at 25 cents. It 
will, no doubt, depend on what developments are seen within the next few 
weeks in the oil business. 

The Vishnu Oil Company drilling west of Sunset is still testing the terri- 
tory, not having found any indications of oil in paj'ing quantities up to the 
depth of 1600 feet. They are sti.. at work and general manager Sperry 
hopes to get the gusher he strikes periodically (according to the newspapers) 
some time before the earth has been passed through. 
Storage in the Field. 

The amount of oil stored in the Kern Eiver field is well known to ho 
about 15,000,000 barrels. This is all the fuel oil there is in sight and if every 
well was put to work within the next six months and every stick of timber and 
joint of pipe available during that time was used, the state could not add one 
single barrel to the amount of oil stored and at the same time supply the de- 
mand for fuel and refining oil. This 15,000,000 barrels is in the hands of the 
Standard Oil Company and every barrel of it cost them from 30 to 35 cents. 
It is not supposed that the monopoly is going to sell oil for less than cost. 
The oil business is not on a boom and the producers who have put their 
money into the business do not have any desire to see a repetition of the 
days of 1900, but the business is in a more healthy condition than it has 
been for the last five years and the time is in sight when the producer will 
be able to get cost and a fair profit on the money invested in the oil business. 
The prices now ruling are not high enough to justify the many wild cat 
schemes that take the investors money and give him nothing in return 
for it, but are good enough so that the men who have wells drilled may 
pump them at a profit and if their production falls off as it always does, may 
drill another well or two without going in debt with the prospect of never 
getting out. 

NEW OIL FIELITAT ARROYO GRANDE 

The newest oil field to be opened up in California is the Arroyo Grande 
district, located in San Luis Obispo County, about 25 miles north of Santa 
Maria. While only two producers have been developed, yet conservative oper- 
ators are putting their money into the devlopment of the district with un- 
bounded faith in its future. 

The successful company thus far is the Tiber, which, together with the 
Perpetual operating near by, is controlled by the larger stockholders in the 
Oil City Petroleum and Twenty-eight companies in the Coalinga field. These 
companies commenced operations in the Arroyo Grande field a little over a 
year ago — in fact the first well of the Tiber company was finished just about 
a year ago, and is considered a very good producer. No. 2 has just recently 
been finished and is said to be at least a 600 barrel producer. No. 3 has 
spudded in and work is progressing nicely. The company will continue to drill 
until it has a production sufficiently large to warrant a pipe line to tide- 
water at Oil Port, where it has a tract of land upon which it can readily 
erreet tanks, and, if necessary, arrange for its own shipping. 

Just south of the Tiber on the Dunean-McNee ranch the McNee Oil Com- 
pany has just spudded in well No. 1. As the well is only about 200 feet from 
Tiber No. 2 the same good results are assured. 

Associated Oil Company is drilling on its 2200 acre tract west of the 
Tiber company at a depth of over 2000 feet. A good showing of oil has been 
encountered and the present outlook for a good well is encouraging. 

A new company has recently been incorporated to acquire and develop 
190 acres of land on which is located the old Becket well near Arroyo Grande. 
It is known as the Crown Oil Company and the holdings are considered to have 
much merit. 

Santa Lucia Oil Company is going ahead with its well No. 1 on the 
Andrews lease about 10 miles north of Arroyo Grande. Several accidents have 
caused much delay on this well but the outlook is now encouraging. 

Work is progressing favorably on well No. 2 of the Perpetual Oil Com- 
pany on the Branch lease. No. 1 well was abandoned on the Steele ranch 
after going into the serpentine •formation. 

A new derrick is being errected on the site of Logan No. 1 which was 
destroyed by fire some time ago. The outlook at the time of the accident 
was very incouraging. 

New Huasna Oil Company has commenced operations on the Huasna ranch 
east of Arroyo Grande. No. 1 well is progressing favorably. 

La Grande Oil Company is drilling No. 1 well on the Dutra-York lease 
west of town. This company also holds a lease on a large portion of the 
Huasna ranch. 

Crystal Oil Company is drilling a well on the D. Olivera lease. 

Oak Park Oil Company's well No. 1, on the "Vetter lease, is progressing 
favorably. 

Well No. 1 of the California-New Love Oil Company is going ahead nicely 
on the Warner lease. 

Present operations in the Arroyo Grande field are as follows: 
Company Producing Drilling New Rigs 

Tiber 2 1 

Perpetual 1 

Oak Park 1 

La Grande 1 

McNee 1 

Associated 1 

California-New Love 1 

Crystal 1 

New Huasna 1 

Santa Lucia 1 

Crown i 

Total 2 10 1 



THE SANTA MARIA OIL FIELDS 

In this review of the Santa Maria oil field very much can be said of its 
development if considered from an annual point of view, but as each issue 
of the Pacific Mining & Oil Reporter contains an up-to-date report of 
operations the facts to many are not new. A general resume of the field, 
however, is, nevertheless, valuable for relative comparison. 
No Storing of Oil. 
Perhaps the first point of comparison is the increased delivery of oil 
during the year. Production has naturally increased with added wells, but 
shipments have also increased to such an extent as to practically exhaust the 
storage. In fact the amount of oil in storage was never less in the history 
of the oil field. The absolute policy of every oil company, is to shut down 
the wells if there is no immediate demand for the oil. No mutual agreement 
or understanding in this matter has been entered into between any of the 
companies. But from the depressing effect of prices of oil, experienced by 
interior oil producers, often occasioned by having a large oil surplus in the 
field, every one is naturally avoiding any storage beyond the small amounts 
in receiving tanks. Recently a gusher in one of the Union Oil Company's 
wells affords a very small storage, but not enough to be worthy of note. 

There is, therefore, quite a contrast between the amount of field stocks 
of a year ago to day. Owing to the Union Oil Company's great gusher and 
to an uncontrollable gusher of the Brookshire Company, there was something 
like 750,000 barrels of oil in storage at the close of last year. Today there 
is scarcely 200,000 barrels of storage oil in the field, including that in the 
receiving tanks of pipe-line companies. 

A tendency to look to Port Harford as the dependable delivery point with 
pipe lines laid from the field, has developed. Within the year the Union Oil 
Company has discarded some of its own tankage cars to the Port. Not- 
withstanding the increased production, little oil is being shipped to the broad 
gauge — to the Southern Pacific Casmalia station — except the small amount 
under the direct contract to the Associated Oil Company. Gaviota on the 
Santa Barbara channel gets only a pittance of oil. 

Three pipe lines reach from the field to Port Harford. They are: The 
Standard Oil Company, eight-inch line; The Union with a six inch line; and re- 
cently the Graeiosa has completed an eight inch line to Oilport on San Luis 
Bay. The last line under the name of "Coast Oil Transport Co.," is to be 
public carrier. Its line commences at the Graeiosa Company's wells and 

passes near Orcutt for any further connection with Independent Companies. 
The Union Oil Company will soon be laying still another eight inch pipe 
line. 

The Extension of the Field. 

Next to consider, in a general way, is the extension of the proven oil 
field. No headway has been made west of the proven field of a year j _ 
The Union Oil Company and the Recruit have spent some money experimenting 
west of the narrow guage track. Out of eight test wells of these and other 
companies, one well of the Recruit, near Divide Station, may be a producer. 
In this field, unless several hundred feet of oil bearing formation is passed 
through it is not considered a paying well. To bore from 3000 to 4000 feet 
without penetrating a good body of oil sand is found profitless. 

A remarkable tilt in the formation occurs near the Divide. The Recruit 
or Associated has bored nearly 3S00 feet close to the Divide and practically 
abandoned the well. Then the company experimented a little over one-half mile 
west on top of the hill and have at 3000 feet a very good show,ing. 

The Graeiosa Oil Company in the Los Alamos anticline has evidently not 
ventured very far westerly in its own field, nor have they experimented south 
of the territory proven a year ago. The Western Union, however, after 
finding that its formation to the east dips rapidly, is putting down its last 
well, No. 31, a half mile south of proven territory. It is now about 2200 
feet and the formation will be interestingly watched after it passes the 3000 
foot mark. 

The Los Alamos slope of the Lompoc anticline has in a general way 
proven unsatisfactory. To the north of the proven field no further extension 
of territory has been made through the entrie year. 

Eastward, alone — five to six miles east — the Palmer Oil Company has 
struck oil within the usual depths of the proven oil field's wells, finishing 
up No. 1 at 3200 feet. The oil here is somewhat heavier, but is an ideal fuel. 
The well is a fine producer. The easterly extension is, therefore, to be looked 
to as the only probable expansion of the field. 

The Year's Development. 

Within the limits of the proven area during the year a great many more] 
wells have been bored. The Union Oil Company leads in number. The] 
Western Union, Pinal and Graeiosa follow next in order. 

Three pronounced gushers have added to the history of the field during* 
the year. Brookshire No. 4 early in the year diverted part of the gas flow 
of the famous Union Oil Company's Hartnell gusher, but gradually subsided. 
One of the wells of the Graeiosa Oil Company within a month changed from a 
steady good behaved flowing well to a boisterous gusher. It spouted thousands 
of barrels daily for nearly a week before it could be controlled. One of the 
Union Oil Company's wells, on the Santa Maria Oil and Gas Company's lease, 
burst its bounds quite recently and gushed likewise. This was also a finished 
well. Perhaps there is some intermittent flow of gas underground which 
occasionally breaks through some crevice near the wells and forces up the 
otherwise slow moving column of oil. Many lesser gushers are met with in 
the field, but they are usually controlled by flushing the wells. 
Permanency of the Wells. 

How has the volume of oil in the wells held out in general during the yearl 
is another question to answer. Surprisingly well, under the cir- 

cumstances, we reply. While it is to be expected that a well decreases in 
flow, the decrease has been slow. In wells that penetrate a deep stratum of 
oil, the decrease has been very gradual. But many wells that have declined 
in flow have this year been pumped, a great aid to flowing wells after 
the first gas pressure has subsided. Some wells do not penetrate much oil 
formation, when suddenly, perhaps, they encounter gas pressure and quite a 
volume of oil is at first spouted, which, when it subsides, gives a disappointing 
yield of oil. When further deepened these wells usually hold out better. 
The Union Oil Company in particular has been deepening several of its wells 
to increase the production. Altogether, allowing for shortcomings found in 
every other field, this additional year's development has attested to the 
general permanency of the wells in the proven field. 



PACIFIC \IIMN<; i- oil. REPORTER. 



15 



New Companies. 

mly one 
the field tli 
to drill, more ..■*). .viallv thi 

for t'ii were kept down 

Oil ( Companies in 

indard Oil Company, ;tt the 

that prices did not entirely collapse 

-mn. 

The Union An Independent Company. 

any had its own pipe Line and it* own 
oultl he independent. For a while, however, the 
shut down, and it was duo to its own perseverance 
I'lus nil found salt' thai justified con- 
field. The Union lias 1 n exceedingly for- 

in its undertakings li hi u its territory by tli.- purchase of 

e present rise of prices in the market; the oil 
now than heretofore. 
onipany has an independent telephone line between its various 
i ouch with each well. A planl of its own fur- 
all tin* wells, thus avoiding the danger of k ;is ignition 
Port Harford the Company ins a Bmall but 
d1 refinery t<> take off a port ion of thi more volatile products of 
iil without submitting it to the more tedious fractional 
h is done at the refiuery at Oleum, on San Francisco Hay. 
only pari of the oil is thus quickly processed, the high Hash test oil being 
prohibited entrance in the market, 

acquisition of the control of the Newlove Oil Company tin- Union 
cured the mosi valuabT tolding in the Santa Maria field. 

I.. K. BLOCHMAN, 
t try Santa Maria Chamber of Commerce. 

RETROSPECTIVE NEVADA 

ntuiued from Potic li' 

. first day ■ L905, holds a daily afternoon and evening session, 

membership of sixty-five and is building for itself a now home to 

Seats on the old exchange arc valued at $3000, Goldfield 

Exchange Board has a membership of 200, has paid $30,000 for a 

emporary quarters, will open business with the opening 

of the uew year, and in March next will build a $50,000 stone edifice for its 

A telephone and telegraph system, postal service, auto lines and a rail- 
road afford the desert city communication with that part of the world not 
so fortunate as to have been located in Goldfield district. The long distance 
^»hone extends to Bullfrog, Tonopah, Manhattan and all neighboring camps. 
The Western Union is pulling down telegraph tolls at the rate of a million 
dollars per annum and rates second to San Francisco of all cities of the 
slop.-. The Postal Telegraph Company has announced its intention to 
enter the field. Not satisfied with all its present advantages, Goldfield is 
waging a stiff fight for the removal to herself of the county seat from 
Hawthorn. 

Advent of the Tonopah and Goldfield railroad was celebrated in Goldfield 

ar ago last September. Though a through Pullman train connects the 
brush metropolis with the Golden Gate city the service is inadequate 
to the enormous demands made upon it and influential San Franciscans are 
joining in a* movement with representative people of Goldfield looking to 
a better one. By the middle of February, Goldfield and Tonopah will have 
■ onnected with Bullfrog and Los Angeles and Salt Lake City by the 
completion of the Tonopah-Bullfrog line, a branch of the Tonopah and Gold- 
field. At Khyolite this road connects with the Las Vegas and Tonopah and 
to Goldfield both the harbor of San Pedro and the coal fields of Utah. 
The Las Vegas and Tonopah is also building north to Tonopah, to connect 
with the Tonopah and Bullfrog, both roads tapping Cuprite, Gold Mountain, 
Lida, Tule Canyon and the rich ranges in Death Valley. The Tonopah 

and Tidewater, known as the Borax Smith road, will also enter Goldfield from 
the BOuth, giving connection with the Santa Fc. 

Light-weight-Gans and Nelson fought in Goldfield last Labor Day. Gans 
and Herman will meet in Tonopah on New Year's day. A heavy-weight 
is arranged for Bullfrog on the occasion of the celebration of the 
railroad's advent, set for about the first of next April, and Manhattan has up 
a big bonus to induce Mr. Gans and Mr. Nelson to visit them professionally at 
i convenient date after the New Year's engagement. From all this it 

might seem that Nevada is striving for fame of the Queensbury savor, but it 
should not be imagined that softening influences and refined instincts are 
entirely smothered by these beligerent manifestations. Goldfield's schools 
are an argument to the contrary. Last Thanksgiving Day the citizens of 
the city assembled at the central school to witness a flag-raising. As "Old 
Glory'' was unfurled and rose upon the mast, there were moist eyes among 
Ui'' \ oterans of the camp whose memories carried them back to the days of 
the few and straggling tents where now stand the magnificent stone and 
brick structures that house the eastern methods of the desert metropolis. 
It was the same dauntless spirit which found Goldfield and made her desert 
unsightliness a beautiful home for those children, which raised that flag and 
followed it to ih" foremost place among the nations of the world.. 

And besides the children, there are women in Goldfield, young and am- 
bitious women who by the virtue of their merits are winning their independent 
There are older women who are through the darkest hours and into 
the light have stood by the sides of their husbands and are now sharing the 
rewards which they helped to earn. It was a woman who filed the first 
location notice in the regularly organized mining district of Goldfield. Women 
organized the Ladies Aid Society and built the well-known landmark, Ladies 
Aid Hall, which is the largest public gathering place in the city. The edifice 

erected by public subscription for charitable purposes, but soon thereafter, 
there were found no rails upon charity and it has been devoted to a place of 
amusement. While some people of delicate nerves might be shocked by the 
fad that battling Nelson trained for his Gans fight in Ladies Aid Hall, a 
for their feelings might be offered in the information that in that 
same hall was horn every church which exists in Goldfield today. Congre- 
gations mel there an.] worshipped there and there raised the money to build 
the statelj spired structures under whose roofs they have gathered since. 



GRACIOSA OIL COMPANY 


PRODUCERS OF 

High-Grade Crude Petroleums 


Loading Stations 

CASMALIA on Coast Division S. P. ' 

OILPORT WHARF, San Luis Bay 


Works 
SANTA MARIA FIELD California 


Offices 
1442 Van Ness Ave San Francisco 



CALIFORNIAN PETROLEUM REFINERIES, Ltd. 

Refinery 
OILPORT San Luis Obispo County, Cal. 

Daily capacity, 10,000 barrels 
Special Safety Fuel Oils, ex-Refinery Wharf, or S. F. Delivery 

High-Grade Kerosenes, Gasolines, Benzines, 
Distillates. 



Offices 
1442 Van Ness Ave. 



San Francisco 



Western Oil Refining & Manufacturing Co. 

Refiners of 

High-Grade California Crude Petroleum 



Offices 

1442 Van Ness Avenue San Francisco 

Works Rodeo, California 



COAST OIL TRANSPORT CO. 



PIPE LINES 



From Santa Maria Field 

To Casmalia, Coast Division S. P. Co. 

To San Luis Bay 

Tank Steamer "Catania," capacity, 23,000 barrels 

Offices 
1442 Van Ness Avenue San Francisco 



16 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL EEPORTER. 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 

The Oil and Mining Authority of the Pacific Coast 



Published Semi-Monthly by 
Pacific Oil Reporter Company 

Incorporated 



EDWARD S. EASTMAN 
MARIA R. WINN 
KARL R. EASTMAN 



Managing Editor 

Secretary- Treasurer 

Field Manager 



OFFICE AND EDITORIAL ROOMS 

Suite 37 Saint Mungo Building, 1300 Golden Gate Avenue 

San Francisco, California 

TELEPHONE WEST 6677 



Subscription price, $2.00 per year, in advance, to any part ol the United States, Canada 
or Mexico. Add $1.00 for foreign subscriptions. 

Entered as second-class matter Nov. 5th, 1906, at the Post Office at San Francisco, Cal., 
under an Act of Congress of March 3, 1879. 



THE GOLDFIELD STRIKE 



At the eoinmencenient of 1907, Uoldfield, the present camp in the lime- 
light of public favor, presents anything but a gratifying spectacle so far as 
local conditions are concerned. One of the most unfortunate of strikes is 
now in full force and practically every large mine in the district has suspended 
operations until an adjustment can be effected. 

There is every reason to believe that the strike has been brought on 
principally by the recent attempt to check the high, grading which has been 
practiced in all of the richer mines of the district to the material enrichment 
of the miners and the assayers who bought the stolen ore. It is an actual 
fact there were dozens of these so-called assayers in Goldfield that were 
simply conducting a "fence" for the stolen gold the "assay office" being 
but a blind. 

While in Goldfield recently we interviewed several well posted men on 
this subject and were informed that it was no trick for a miner to get away 
with a hunk of gold worth from $5 to $20 each and every day he worked 
while record steals of $50 and $100 were common. In the Mohawk leases at that 
time miners were paid about $7. a day and despite the fact that a watchman 
was employed to watch every three men they had no trouble in doubling their 
wages. And, inasmuch, as there was no one to watch the watchman it 
was thought that the watchman did even better than this. The ' ' assayers ' ' 
had it all their own way in the purchase, paying whatever they chose and, no 
doubt, coining money in their illegitimate transactions. 

When Geo. Wingfield and Senator Nixon took over the Mohawk, Jumbo, 
Red Top, and Combination, all with high grade ore, practically all of the 
leases expired and the combination set about to work the properties on a legiti- 
mate basis. The regular wage scale of $4. was paid, a "change room" was 
proposed where all of the miners should be obliged to disrobe and disgorge, 
should they have any of the stolen ore upon their persons. It is believed that 
was the real cause of the present strike, that the miners finding themselves 
bereft of a handsome income found their salaries inadequate to meet the 
' ' abnormal conditions ' ' of the camp or in other words, found that it was 
hard to come down from an income of $10.00 a day or more to a salary of but 
$4. So they now demand $5 a day, in default of which they threaten to tie up 
the whole camp. 

The strike is positively a most unreasonable one from any point of view. 
Four dollars a day is very good wages for a miner anywhere. It is true that 
the expense of living in Goldfield is, just now, extremely high owing to a 
shortage of all commodities and the excessive freight rates. But such a condi- 
tion is not likely to long exist. By mid-summer the cost of living should be 
no higher than in other Nevada camps where miners are, and have at all 
times been paid, but $4 a day, the regular rate throughout the state. 

The prospects for an immediate settlement of the strike are hard to de- 
termine. The operators are loath to grant an unreasonable aggressive demand 
and the miners are just as determined to force the fight to a finish. A daily 
settlement is looked for by some; others say a settlement is impossible for 
possibly several weeks. 

But the strike should not effect the price of the stock of any worthy mine 
of the district. It certainly does not effect the worth of the property beyond 
retarding its earnings. Yet it has certainly had a strong bear effect on prac- 
tically every stock of the district; some say that the strike is but a part of 
a general bear movement to depress the value of the stocks of several of 
the principal mines in order that the manipulators may profit thereby. 

Investors and stockholders should not be intimidated. Strikes or manipu- 
lation cannot change the real worth of the stocks of a good mine. The value 
is still there as the rich ore and those who hold on to their stock and take 
advantage of the present market to secure more will eventually enjoy unpre- 
cedented gains for as soon as the present difficulties between miner and 
operator has been settled as soon as the present manipulation of the market 
has ceased, all stocks in wealthy Nevada mines will jump from one to ten 
times the price at which they are now quoted. Lock your stocks in your safes. 
Don't get paniky. Remember that a stock quotation is no indication of the 
value of your stock. The stock game is an old one and was played years 
before you were born. Exaggeration, false rumors, lies, are all a part of the 
little game. Stock has value only according to the worth of the mine. Prac- 
tically every listed Goldfield stock is worth from 50 to several hundred times 
its present intrisic value. 

Our advise is to purchase all the listed Nevada stocks your pocket-book 
will allow, you to. Then go and borrow every cent you can, mortgage your 



property and buy stock with that. Then lock it up in your safe or put it in 
safe deposit and see it grow into a profit away beyond the fondest expecta- 
tions of the most sanguine. 

Goldfield mines have the value because they have the ore. Someone is 
going to get the profits. Will it be you! 

THE GUL F COAST FIELDS 

Special to Pacific Mining and Oil Reporter: — 

BEAUMONT, Texas, Dec. 31. — Texas and Louisiana in 1906 produced 
21,000,000 barrels of crude petroleum, valued at $12,180,000 at the wells. 
While the combined yield of the two states was greater in quantity in 
1904 and 1905 than in the year just closed, the revenue from the output 
has never been so large as in 1906. In 1904 the production of Texas and 
Louisiana amounted to 25,200,371 barrels, valued at $9,229,814 at the wells; 
in 1905 the output was 37,046,605 barrels valued at $9,153,587 at the wells 
In both 1904 and 1905 there was a surplus of production. The Batson field 
in Southeast Texas and the Jennings field in Southwest Louisiana flooded 
the market with fuel oil in 1904, and in the following year Jennings maintain- 
ed an output of nearly 1,000,000 barrels in a month, while a new and very pro- 
lific pool was opened up at Humble, in Southeast Texas, yielding 15,594,310 
barrels within ten months. The abundance of oil, however, worked as a 

depressing influence upon prices, much of the output being disposed of at from 
12 to 20 cents a barrel. 

This past year has witnessed a reversal of conditions. Instead of a sur- 
plus there has been a shortage in output — in other words, current demands 
have exceeded current production, with the result that the stock of oil 
accumulated in 1904 and 1905, amounting to about 20,000,000 barrels, have 
been drawn on to the extent of 9, 500,000 barrels to supply the excess require- 
ments of overproduction. As the output has diminished, prices have ad- 
vanced proportionately. At the first of the year the market for Gulf 
Coast crude at the wells ranged from 30 to 40 cents a barrel. The close 
of the year sees prices firm at 70 and 75 cents a barrel. 

The Gulf Coast Districts — comprising the producing pools in Southeast 
Texas and Southwest Louisiana — are credited with an output of 20,044,500 
barrels in 1906, the balance of the production for the year coining from the 
Corsieana and Powell fields in Navarro County and the Henrietta field in 
Clay County, several hundred miles north of the Gulf Coast. Petroleum 
was developed at Corsieana in 1896, but has never been produced in the quan- 
tities that have made the Gulf Coast region a factor in the world's supply 
of oil. The entire output of the Corsieana, Powell and Henrietta Districts 
since 1896 has been 6,025,057 barrels, while the Gulf Coast Districts since 
1901 have produced 121,181,262 barrels. Prom Spindletop alone 35,736,289 
barrels of oil have been produced and sold in the last six years; from Sour 
Lake 21,073,507 barrels in five years; from Batson 17,357,096 barrels in three 
years and one month; from Humble 19,118,210 barrels in two years; from 
Jennings 20,796,608 barrels in five years and from Saratoga 6,410,267 barrels 
in the same period. During the six years that the development of the 
Gulf Coast oil industry has been in progress, not less than 5,000,000 barrels 
of crude petroleum have been consumed on the various fields for fuel under 
boilers, and of this no account is taken in the net total of 121,181,262 
barrels, produced and sold. The net value of the Texas and Louisiana oil 
output to date, amounting to 127,206,319 barrels, is put at $48,794,752 at 
the wells. 

Until 1906 the supply of oil in the Gulf Coast region has been replenished 
each year by the opening up of new and important territory. In 1901 
Spindletop furnished the production which formed the beginning of the fuel 
oil trade and refining industry in this section. The amount of oil utilized that 
year amounted to 3,593,113 barrels. In 1902 Jennings added 548,617 barrels 
and Sour Lake 44,838 barrels to Spindletop 's output of 17,420,949 barrels, 
making the total production 18,014,404 barrels. In 1903 the Sour Lake 

pool was developed, yielding 8,848,159 barrels, which added to Spindletop 's 
8,600,905 barrels, Batson 4,518 barrels, Jenning's 892,609 barrels, and 25,192 
barrels from other smaller fields, brought the total up to 18,371,383 barrels. 
In 1904 Batson supplied the bulk of new production, being credited with 
10,904,737 barrels; Spindletop produced 3,433,842 barrels, Sour Lake 6,442,357 
barrels, Saratoga 739,239 barrels, Jennings 2,923,066 barrels and other fields 
188,028 barrels, constituting a total yield of 24,631,269 barrels. The Humble 
field, opened up in January 1905, produced 15,594,310 barrels in that year, 
the output being augmented by 1,652,780 barrels from Spindletop, 3,362,153 
barrels from Sour Lake, 3,125,028 barrels from Saratoga, 3,774,841 barrels from 
Batson, 8,891,416 barrels from Jennings and 126,065 barrels from other dis- 
tricts — a total yield of 36, 526,593 barrels. 

Jennings produced more oil than any other Gulf Coast field in 1906, its 
output being 7,540,900 barrels. Humble was next with 3,523, 900 barrels, 
and, in order, Batson with 2,673,000 barrels, Saratoga with 2,546,000 barrels 
Sour Lake with 2,376,000 barrels, Spindletop with 1,034,700 barrels and miscel- 
laneous districts, including Hoskins Mound, Dayton and Matagorda, 350,000 
barrels, or a total production of 20,044,500 barrels. 

Three new pools that give more or less promise of becoming prolific 
producers have been developed in the past eighteen months. These are 
the Dayton pool, in Liberty County about 50 miles of Beaumont, the Hoskins 
Mound pool in Brazoria County, 40 miles south of Houston and near the 
Gulf Coast, and the Caddo pool in Caddo County, (La.), about 230 miles north 
of Beaumont, and about 25 miles north of Shreveport, La. Dayton has been 
a disappointment for the reason that no deep sand, such as exists in the im- 
portant Gulf Coast pools, has yet been developed. Since September 1905 
it has produced 175,000 barrels of oil. The Sun Pipe Line Company and 
Security Oil Company have pipe line connections with the field, and are 
running the output. A well was brought in by the Mound Oil Company at 
Hoskins Mound at a depth of 582 feet in October, 1905, producing from 2000 
to 3000 barrels a day. Since that time it has yielded about 125,000 barrels 
and is now making 300 barrels a day. Although other wells have been 
sunk in the territory adjacent to it all efforts to secure additional production 
in this field have failed. A pipe line is in operation between Hoskins Mound 
and Danbury, a station on the Brownsville railroad, ten miles distant, and the 
oil is being shipped in tank cars for fuel use. At Caddo a flowing well 
was drilled in at a depth of 2160 feet in October 1906. A pipe line has been 



PACIFIC MINIMI A. OIL REl'OKTKR. 



17 



Siiui made from 

going down in iins territory any 

The present well i> producing 
rels a day. 

lop ■ prolii during the paal 

■ loos not mean that the industry in future will be depend 

i f iritis, whose outpui is gradually diminishing. The 

,.r to that which existed in the early months of 1903, when, 

tput declining from month to month, tin- price of oil 

At that time there were many who predicted that 

oil industry would 'lie oul as the Spindletop wells became 

i'lv has !••■. n replenished from year to 

v of new Bources of production Sour Lake Saratoga, 

hi, Humble and Jennings. There is every reason to believe thai the 

,-iitir- st is (lotted with pools of <>ii as prolific irhich already 

t'ound. To locate them requires patient and persistent drilling 

wells are going down in the Cult" ('nasi region. The drill 

may reveal one or inure DOW pools any day. 

Two of the interests which have large investments tn refineries in South- 

-—the Gulf Refining Company and rhe Ti sac I ompanj are pre- 

paring to obtain a supply of the high grade crude produced in the Indian 

Territory field, and to this end have made arrangements to lay eight 

inch pipe lines from Glenn pool, fifteen miles smith of Tulsa. I. T.. to 

ect with their Southeast Texas pipe tine systems. Each of these two 

rs involves an outlay of not less than $5,000,000. The surveys are 

now being made for the lines, and material is on the way from the easl 
with which to begin construction. Work has already stalled nn seventeen 

'"- barrel tanks for the Gulf Pipe Line Company (associated with the 
Refining Company and J. M. Guffey Petroleum Company) in the Glenn 
field, and The Texas Company will begin the erection of ten 37,500 barrel 
steel tanks in the Glenn district in January. Both companies have opem <l 
offices in Tulsa, and The Texas Company has also established offices at Dallas, 
T- x„ from which point the construction of that company's line will be di- 
rected. The length of the lines will be approximately 450 miles eash. the 
Gulf line connecting at Sour Lake with the lines terminating at Port Arthur. 
where the Gulf Refinery is located, and The Texas Company's line joining the 
present system at Humble, thereby forming a through trunk line from Tulsa to 
deep water at Port Arthur. The Texas Company has a refinery at Port 
Arthur, and another at Port Neches, a few miles south of Beaumont on the 
Meches river. It will require eight to twelve months to complete the lines. 

The capacity of the five refineries in Southeast Texas is put at 27,000 
barrels of crude oil a day. It seems probable that this capacity will bo 
increased by 6000 to 8000 barrels before the end of 1907. During the past 
year it is estimated that the refineries in this section treated 8,000,000 
"barrels of crude, all of which was of the heavy variety produced in the Gulf 
Coast region. The Territory oil contains much greater values for refining 
than the Gulf Coast product. "Where two per cent of gasoline may be ob- 
tained from the Gulf Coast crude, the Territory oil will yield 10 to 12 per 
cent. The yield of kerosene from the Territory crude also is much greater, 
ranging from 19 to 23 per cent against 13 to 15 per cent from Gulf Coast 
oil. With the refineries obtaining the bulk of their supply from Indian 
Territory, there will be more heavy crude available for fuel use in Texas and 
Louisiana. Thus both the output of refinery products and the sale of fuel 
oil will be increased. No limit may be put upon the possibilities of the re- 
fining industry in Southeast Texas when an adequate supply of the high- 
grade Territory crude has been secured by the construction of the pipe 
lines that are to be completed during the coming year. The location of the 
refineries is ideal — being at tidewater — giving them a free outlet for their 
products to the markets of the world. In 1905 the shipments of, refinery 
products from Southeast Texas, through the Port Arthur and Sabine amounted 
to 3,887,091 barrels, valued at $7,774,182. In 1906 the quantity was increased 
to 4,282,982 barrels, and the value to $10,707,425. Texas refinery products go 
to all the southern states, to Atlantic coast points, and to Europe. The busi- 
ness has grown from year to year, and with light crude as a basis for opera- 
tions, it is not to be doubted that the refining industry in this section will 
rank with that of the greatest refining centers in America. 

The shipments of all grades of Gulf Coast petroleum (excepting refinery 
products in tank cars) in 1906 amounted to 25,590,292 barrels, having an esti- 
mated value of $25,344,847. Rail shipments of crude to fuel oil consumers 
constituted more than one-half of the entire movement, amounting to 13,042,- 
131 barrels — a decrease of 1,497,967 barrels as compared with 1905. Shipments 
of crude by vessel from Sabine, Port Arthur, Plaquemine and Port Neches 
amounted to 8,265,179 barrels, indicating an increase of 465,625 barrels in this 
item as compared with 1905. Shipment? of refinery products from Port Arthur 
and Sabine amounted to 4,282,982 bbls., indicating an increase of 395,S91 bbls. 
as compared with 1905. The total movement of all grades (excepting refinery 
products in tank cars of which no records are available) showed a decrease 
of 636,181 barrels as compared with the previous year, but, on account of the 
higher scale of prices prevailing in the past twelve months, the estimated 
value of the shipments exceeded that of 1905 by $9,408,940. 

The growth and importance of the oil development which has occurred in 
the west and southwest since 1900 are aptly illustrated by a reference to the 
percentages of the total production of petroleum east of the Mississippi river 
as compared with the production west of the Mississippi river in this period. 
Up to and including 1875, Pennsylvania furnished all of the oil produced in 
the United States. In that year the output was 8,787,514 barrels. During 
1876 "West "Virginia produced 120,000 barrels, Ohio 31,763 barrels and Cali- 
fornia 12,000 barrels — this last mentioned being the first production recorded 
west of the Mississippi. Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Ohio increased 
their output and in 1891 their combined yield exceeded 53,000,000 barrels, 
while the territory west of the Mississippi produced less than 1,000,000 
barrels. With the addition of Indiana, the eastern fields in 1896 — the 
year that oil was developed at Corsicana, Texas — attained their maximum 
production of nearly 60,000,000 barrels, while the western fields were credited 
with 1,600,000 barrels. Beginning in 1900, the western fields began to show 
in a modest way in the percentage column. In that year the eastern fields 
produced 58,000,000 barrels, or 91.25 per cent of the total yield of the United 
States, while the western states produced 5,200,000 barrels, of which California 
was credited with 4,324,484 barrels, Texas 836,039 barrels and Kansas and 



Indian Territory si.lsii barrels, the entire western out hut constituting 

m of the total. Spindletop factor in 1901, and 

tields were credited with 19.26 per cenl of the entire yield, whil) 
fields supplied 80.06 p< I outpui in T 

barrels, in California to 13,984,268 barrels, and the western fields began to 

loom up large upon the map of the nil world, with 37.16 per cenl of the 

total yield to their credit, w bile 

of the total. In 1903 I B produced 24,382,472 barrels, Texas and Lou- 

isiana 18,873,343 barrels and Kansas and Cndian Territory 1,071,125 barrels, 
.tput of the western fields in this year constituted ! 

the total, while the eastern fields wen I he 

westert Por the first time produced more nil than 

14, when Texas and Louisiana increased their outpui to 25,200,371 bi 
ornia to 89,649,434 barrels and Kansas, [ndiau Territory and Okl 

rels, their combined outpui forming 51.65 per c< t1 ol total 

against 47.91 per cent supplied by the eastern fields. in L905 the w< item 

! luced the enormous quantity of B2,500,000 barrels L3,i I barrels 

more than the outpui of the entire United states as late as 1901 and within 

'.. ,000 barrels of the total output in L902. Texas and Louisiana furnished 

37,046,605 barrels, California 33,427,473 barrels and the mid-continent field 
i Kansas, Indian Territory and Oklahoma ) 12,013,425 barrels — making 80, 13 
per cenl of the entire output against 38.48 per cent produced i>; 
fields. The figures for 1906 are not available, but, careful estimates make 
the Output of the western fields between 68, mm, mm ; ,nd 6!),0nn,oiM) barrels, 
and that of the eastern fields (including Illinois) 53,000,000 barrels. In the 
matter of percentage of total production, therefore, the western fields no 
doubt have further increased their lead over the eastern states during the 
pasl year. Less than one per cent of the total yield has been furnished each 
year by miscellaneous fields, not included in either of the foregoing percent- 
ages. 

The greatest increase in output noted in any of the various ceutcrs of 
production this past year has occurred in the mid-continent field, and particu- 
larly in the Indian Territory. In 1905 the amount of oil run from wells in 
the mid-continent field was 12,013,495 barrels. In 1906 the runs were nearly 
doubled, amounting to approximately 21,540,593 barrels, exclusive of oil 
tanked by producers. With facilities to handle the entire output, there is 
Little doubt that the production would have been above 30,000,000 barrels. 
The Prairie Oil and Gas Company, western branch of the Standard Oil Com- 
pany, up to the present time has been the only heavy purchaser of mid-con- 
tinent crude. This company took approximately 21,190,593 barrels of the 
1906 output, placing about 9,400,000 barrels in steel storage on the field, 
delivering about 5,000,000 barrels to the Standard refineries at Neodesha, 
Kan., and Sugar Creek, Mo., and shipping the remainder through the trunk 
pipe- lines, two in number, leading to the Standard's refineries at Whiting, 
Ind., and on the Atlantic Coast, where the crude petroleum is manufactured 
into kerosene, gasoline, naphthas, benzine, lubricating oils and other products. 
In 1905 the Prairie Company stored 6,251,735 barrels of mid-continent crude. 
It now has in tanks on the field more than 22,500,000 barrels of oil, and is 
constantly enlarging its storage capacity by the construction of new tanks. 
Other companies and individual operators have about 1,300,000 barrels of 
crude in storage, making the total stocks of oil nearly 24,000,000 barrels. 

Until July the prices paid by the Prairie Company in 1906 for the best 
grade of mid-continent oil (32 gravity, Beaume, or better) was 52 cents, 
and for crude which it classed as fuel oil (under 30 gravity, Beaume) 35 
cents. During the latter half of the year the market has been 39 cents for 
the best grade and 26 cents for the grade classified as fuel oil. The value of 
the output, according to the market established by the Prairie Company, has 
been about $9,000,000. 

The coming year will witness a change in conditions in the mid-continent 
field. The two Texas interests which will lay eight-inch pipe lines from the 
Tulsa district, in Indian Territory, to the Gulf Coast will be purchasers 
of oil. At the outset they will erect 1,300,000 barrels of steel tankage, which 
will doubtless be added to as necessity requires. Pending the completion of 
the Gulf Co. 's pipe line, the Gulf Refining Company will ship 4000 to 5000 
barrels a day in tank cars from the Glenn pool, south of Tulsa, to the Gulf 
refinery at Port Arthur, a distance of 580 miles. Both the Gulf Company 
and the Texas Company will be in the market for oil, and as the Prairie 
company is increasing its facilities with a view to handling 75,000 barrels 
a- day it probably will be only a question of months until there will be demands 
for 100,000 barrels a day. The present daily capacity of the mid-continent 
field is put at 130,000 to 140,000 barrels, of which about 67,000 barrels is being 
marketed. It is asserted, and with good grounds for belief, that the output 
of the field could be increased to 200,000 barrels a day. 

The principal development in the mid-continent field during the past 
year has been in the Indian Territory, what is thought by many to be the 
most important pool yet discovered in that region having been opened up 
in the Creek Nation, fifteen miles south of Tulsa, on the Glenn farm. The 
first well was drilled in a year ago last November, but development did not 
begin in earnest until the early fall of 1906. During the year about 4000 
acres in the Glenn pool have been defined as producing territory, with a 
capacity in its present stage of development exceeding 40,000 barrels a day. 
Less than 100 wells have been completed in the district. The oil is of 
excellent quality, testing about 37 degrees, Beaume, and contains percentages 
of naphthas and kerosene that make it especially desirable for refining. 
The pay sand is found at the 1500-foot level, and is unusually thick and rich, 
the wells flowing naturally from 40 to 90 barrels an hour when brought in. 

It was the development of the Glenn pool that determined the building 
of pipe lines to the Gulf Coast, although on one has doubted that such lines 
eventually would be constructed to provide an outlet for a portion or all of the 
surplus production in the mid-continent field — the surplus being the amount 
over and above the quantity taken by the Prairie Oil and Gas Company. 
Operators are expecting to see new pools opened up throughout the region 
south of Tulsa and north of the Gulf Coast — an expanse of 500 miles from 
north to south in which indications of oil exist at hundreds of points. Already 
two pools — Corsicana and Powell — have been developed in this territory, then- 
location being about midway between Tulsa and the Gulf Coast. At other 
places petroleum has been developed in small quantities, giving promise. 
however, of a greater yield when the pay sands are located by the drill.. 

HOLLAND S. REAVI9, 
Editor Oil Investors' Journal, Beaumont, Te 



18 



PACIFIC MINING! & OIL REPORTER. 



One Good Investment is Worth a Lifetime of Labor 



9 * 

I r 



1. COLUMBIA MO UN 






' 




An V HiDTiTtSCr '■IT 


7*£~Jai/ 


BlsfKwJwp 



$ MOHRWKCON 

10 NflCKErtKlE LI 

ISHRYGSxMo 



15 TRUCTT LEASE 

16 FRANCES MOHRWR. L.EASE. a 
'7 CURTIS 6R0S LfLflSE.. 

■ sisiluer R'fKrflu'E 

35 ATLRNTANINES 
i<+-G0V-D SARDINE. 
SSST. IVES MINE. 
36KEWRNP1 WINE 
37 LA&UNR MINE. 



. sbthirp cwance nines' 
mc.o.d. mines 
<k> lone, stbh ;' 
»< VICTOR 

lco S^ El - Le > w TI <iE"» - ... 

tSPOHTI_F>NO ♦ — 

J* EL LrtNEV " 

J,S KIN Ksfln r MILL 
« HH.UUS ULStt 



MILLIONAIRES' R 




Goldfield GOLD-HORN 

Par value, $1.00, fully paid and non-assessable C/OpitflllZBtlj 

JOHN J. DUFFIE, President T. J. DONO>l 

Directors, J. W. HENDERSON, JOHN J. DUFF! 



Several Leases Paying 1,000 Per Cent 
to Investors 

The Truitt lease on the Mohawk in Millionaires' Row, with 
the Hayes-Monnette and the Frances-Mohawk, has proved 
one of the most sensational producers in the camp. It is 
handled by Truitt 's Leasing Company, which sold stock last 
spring to begin operations. Not a pick was stuck in the ground 
until late in May, yet in September this company declared a 
dividend of 25 cents a share out of the earnings, which was 
100 per cent on the investment, and the company announces 
its intention of paying ten more dividends of 25 cents each 
before the first of the year. 

Nowhere else does money work so quickly or earn so enorm- 
ous a wage. 

Our GOLD-HORN LEASE Expires 
September 30, 1908 

We are developing our lease on broad lines designed for big 
work, sinking at this moment a double compartment shaft. 
We have shippers East, North, South, and West, and have 
every reason to believe that we will encounter large bodies 
of high-grade ore in some of the mineralized ledges passing 
through our lease. 



We have the same formation and ledges as the Velvet (which 
adjoins us on the northwest). Fortunes have been made all 
around us. We confidently expect to make enormous and fab- 
ulous profits for all who go in with us. We commenced to sink 
October 1, 1906, with twenty-four months to run. When we 
open rich ore, our stock will rise by LEAPS AND BOUNDS. 



FACTS 



We own a long, valuable lease on gold-bearing ground in 
Goldfield. 

We own 20 acres of proven territory in Bullfrog Mining 
District, near Gold Bar Mine. 

We have purchased for our Gold-Horn Lease the latest elec- 
trical hoisting machinery. 

Our officers are among the big mine makers of Nevada. 

We should ship ore and distribute profits before April 1st. 

Life of our Gold-Horn Lease is twenty-two months. 

Stock to be listed on San Francisco and Goldfield Exchanges. 

In ordinary mining you take risks. Mining by leasing con- 
tains smallest element of risk, and profits should be enormous 
and quick. 

You can purchase Goldfield Gold-Horn Mining and Leasing 
Corporation stock to-day for 20c a share. 

Only 100,000 shares to be sold at 20c ; you should act quickly. 
Order NOW by wire. 



I 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER. 



19 



Mining Has Made More People Rich Than Any Other Industry 




■OLDFIELD, NEVADA 



I and Leasing Corporation 



, $1,000,000 



Treasury Stock, $400,000 



Vice-President W. R. MARKT, Secretary and Treasurer 

T. J. DONOVAN C. L. KNOWLTON, W. R. MARKT 



ises Pay Biggest and Quickest Dividends 

■ldfield camp is not three years old, and the daily pro- 
n of yellow metal has reached the $100,000 mark, or at 
te of $3,000,000 per month, most of which is being pro- 
by leasing companies. A good leasing company on a 
ease is a good thing for investors and stockholders; for 
ule their money is put directly in the ground and the 
s are often quick and profitable. Several leasing corn- 
have just paid dividends. There are a score of other in- 
ated leases that soon will enter the producing and divi- 
>aying list. 

e predict that more dividends will be paid out by leasing 
nies during the coming year than from all the other 
nies of the camp working on company account put to- 
."— Editorial Goldfield "News." 



ihawk advanced in one year from 1 5 cents to $20.00 
ire. That's a profit good enough for any one. 
wk and Jumbo are to-day beyond the financial reach 
st of us. But there will be other Mohawks in Gold- 
After all, it only required development work on the 
wk to open up its vast ore bodies. Red Top, 
na, Gold-Horn and St. Ives, all in line and directly 
)f the Mohawk, are in line for Mohawk's success. 



For a Limited Time We Offer 

Fifty thousand shares of the treasury stock at 
twenty cents per share. 

This allotment will soon be over-subscribed. We 
have no salaried officers, a healthy treasury, and 
no debts. This is an opportunity of TO-DAY. 

Wire your subscription immediately, and remit 
by mail. Address : 

W. R. MARKT, 

322 Bush St., San Francisco, Cal. 
References: 

Italian-American Bank, San Francisco. 
Nevada Bank & Trust Co., Goldfield. 



20 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER. 



AMO NG THE M INES 

BULLFROG 

Keane Wonder Mining Company. 
Special Correspondence. 

A new 20-stamp mill and a complete plant for treating the ore is being 
constructed on the property of the Keane Wonder Mining Company at Bullfrog. 
Bapid progress is being made and it is expected that the stamps will commence 
to drop by early spring. 

This company owns twenty-two claims on the Death Valley slope of the 
Funeral Eange, twelve miles south of Ehyolite. Six well defined veins, carrying 
high values, traverse the holdings. One of these ledges is close to 30 feet 
between the walls and actual mill tests give it a value of $18.10 per ton in golu. 
Three tunnels, one above the other, have been driven into the hill on this 
ledge, and $650,000 of ore blocked out. A new tunnel has been started 
from the base of the hill which will tap the ledge within a short distance and 
give the company over 1,000 feet of backs. 

The mill is being furnished by the Eisdon Iron Works of San Francisco, 
and will have facilities for concentration, amalgamation, and cyaniding. From 
tests already made, over 90 per cent of the values will be saved. A Eibblet 
aerial tram will carry the ore from the mine to the mill. 

The Keane Wonder group of claims was located by ' ' Jack ' ' Keane, :.i 
noted desperado type, who, until the last few months, has deemed it advisable 
to keep "out of sight. " Keane struck the southern country something over 
two years ago with a wild look in his eye and a gun in his belt. An Indian 
Buck was his only companion, and through him he managed to keep up a stock 
of provisions. During his idle moments ' ' Jack ' ' prospected the hills in the 
neighborhood of his retreat, and, after several months, succeeded in finding 
a ledge that, with little development, opened into a large ore body with a six- 
inch stringer of vastly rich gold ore. He sent the Indian to ballarat, Cal., 
with a sack of this ore, at various times, which netted him a handsome profit. 
After a year or more had drif ten by, ' ' Jack ' ' himself considered it safe to 
venture into Ballarat, which he did, loading himself down with the precious 
metal. After receiving the money for his ore he proceeded to celebrate, with 
the result that, before the evening was half over, he found himself surrounded 
by four men who seemed intent on making him a prisoner. Before the men 
could draw their guns "Jack" had them covered, and, in the twinkling of an 
eye, the four men each carried a bullet from Keane 's gun, and " Jack ' ' has 
escaped by the back door. He reached camp in safety and has, until the past 
few months, been extremely cautious about exposing himself. 

Naturally the news of the rich ore taken from the mine to Ballarat be- 
came widely known with the result that the present management of the 
Keane Wonder succeeded in locating the camp and purchased the property 
for a good sum. They had to do business almost at the point of a gun, for 
"Jack" was suspicious even after the large sum of gold had been paid. 

So wide was the reputation of the mine that within forty-eight hours after 
the stock of the Keane Wonder had been placed on sale every share was sub- 
scribed, insuring ample funds to push operations to the limit. As stated above, 
the heavy machinery is being installed for the operation of what will un- 
doubtedly become one of the largest mines in the history of Nevada. 

Greenwater Bonanza Copper Company. 

The Greenwater Bonanza Copper Company is the name of a corporation 
recently organized to operate on eleven claims in the Greenwater district, 
lying directly between the Saratoga and Eed Boy mines recently reported to 
have been purchased by the Lawson copper combine. 

The Bonanza group lies in the same mineral belt as the Schwab, MacDonald, 
Brock, and Gillis properties. The Schwab interests have declared that they 
will concentrate their forces in Death Valley and rush the development of 
their properties as rapidly as possible. They are now figuring on putting up 
a smelter as soon as possible, both Gillis and MacDonald being in New York 
at the present time to make arrangements for the same. 

The Greenwater Bonanza Copper Company is headed by Charles V. 
Humphrey and H. J. Ealston of San Francisco. Mr. Humphrey is the leading 
mining attorney of the West, while H. J. Ealston is President of the Ealston 
Iron Works, the big steel construction firm of San Francisco, and is also 
heavily interested in several paying California copper mines. The officers 
of the Greenwater syndicate are as follows: 

President, H. J. Ealston, President of the Ealston Iron Works, the big 
steel construction firm 'of San Franeisc'o, and who is also heavily interested 
in some good paying California copper mines. 

Vice-President, E. H. Mead of tne well known Caracia Consolidated 
Copper Company of Utah. 

Treasurer, T. F. Bonneau, who recently consolidated his Black Jack cop- 
per claims at Greenwater with the Schwab interests. 

Secretary, George H. Bush, Attorney for C. W. Clark, manager of the 
United Verdi mines of Arizona. 

Directors: John J. Meyers and C. F. Humphrey, owners of the MurehJc 
and Empire mines near Nevada City, Cal. 

The directorate is one of the strongest of any company yet organized 
in Nevada, which, together with the favorable location of the property, gives 
the company a very promising future. 

The Bullfrog West Extension 
has developed into one of the largest and strongest mines in Bullfrog. In 
sinking a vein lying on an angle of 30 degrees has been encountered ore 
which drifting has been extended over 60 feet, all in high-grade ore. The 
rock is of the Amethyst type being very similar to that from the Original 
Bullfrog. Judge Volney Huggins, one of the principal owners of the mine, 
was in San Francisco for the holidays. He states that, while there is none 
of the stock of the company, for sale, in the interest of the unfinanced and 
undeveloped mines of the camp, he is only too glad to permit a full inspection 
of the property and its workings. He states that visitors are always welcome. 
The mine is now developing high-grade shipping ore. 



The West Extension Annex. 
is a company incorporated to develop a fraction of one and one-seventh acres 
of land adjoining Delaware No. 18 of the West Extension. Developmeut 
to date shows the rich ledge on the West Extension to dip under the Annex, 
therefore the entire 1 1-7 acres is mineralized with the same rich Amathyst 
ore. The price for the small tract of land is said to be the greatest ever 
paid for a fraction of similar area. 

Arrangements have been made to drift from the double compartment 
shaft of the West Extension to develop the Annex, and it is probable that 
the ore will be extracted through the shaft. 

The L. P. McGrary Brokerage Company 

has been incorporated to do business in Bullfrog. The organizer is Mr. L. P. 
McGreary, one of the original discoverers of Bullfrog and for some time past 
the post master at Bullfrog and a pioneer merchant of that place. Mr. Me- 
Greary has been a practical miner all of his life, his father also having made 
the mining business his life work. Mr. McGreary enjoys the confidence and 
good will of all who know him and his many friends wish him the greatest 
success. 



JOHNNIE 

Johnnie, Nevada, December 31, 1906. 
Special Correspondence. 

California capital is constantly showing its interests in Southern Nevada 
mines by its persistent investment of capital, and the latest deal put through 
was the purchase of the Mae and Boone mines by the Boston Johnnie Mining 
Company, which is composed mostly of California bankers. The Mae and the 
Boone are just south of the Minnie Mae claim, the Mae mine joining the 
Bullfrog Johnnie and the Boone lying between the Minnie Mae and the Boston 
Johnnie. The ledge in the Mae mine is a white crystalline quartz that shows 
much free gold and will assay $35 across the face. The Boone has a good 
ledge from which high assays have been taken. In the main shaft of the 
original ground of the Boston Johnnie preparatory to doing development work, 
assay of $25 were obtained across the face. The leases are yielding good 
ore and the rich Bowler ledge has been proven to greater depth, rich specimens 
and ore full of free gold has been extracted. Word has been received that 
the milling machinery is now on the way and it is eagerly awaited as there 
is much ore on the dumps ready for it. 

Manager Browne of the Johnnie Wonder has gone to Denver on business 
connected with the company's affairs as arrangements are being made to 
increase the working force and plans are being discussed regarding future 
development. The development work up to date has been most satisfactory 
and several good ledges have been found. 

On the 700-foot level of the Johnnie Con. mine the ore body maintains 
its width and value. Work is being pushed on the upraising of the new 
shaft but progress is still slow owing to the broken' condition of the ground 
and the much timbering necessary. 

Work on the Globe Johnnie is confined to the lower tunnel level which 
is being driven into the bonanza rock. Though good ore is being extracted, 
nothing of a sensational nature has as yet been discovered on this level. 

The men are still at work in the upper shaft of the Bullfrog Johnnie, 
and the ledge maintains its width and value. It shows heavy mineralization. 

Word has been received by the local manager of the Johnnie Globe that 
the mine will be started up shortly after the first of the year. This property 
is near the Minnie Mae Hill and joins the Globe Johnnie. 

While doing work on the Nevada Johnnie on the Beryl claim a three and 
a-half foot ledge has been disclosed showing high values in gold and some 
chloride of silver. On the North Star claim good ore has been found in 
porphyry. This is the first porphyry found in that part of the country, and 
naturally all are jubilant over the find. 

The Buster Johnnie, adjoining the Johnnie Con. now has a crew of men 
at work. 

A tunnel is being driven into the November claim which adjoins the 
McClanahan mines cutting one of the ledges. 

A three foot quartz ledge was encountered in the shaft of the Midway 
Johnnie which assays $12 across the face. The property is three miles south 
of the town, near the Sunshine and the Evening Star mines. 

MANHATTAN 

Manhattan, Nevada, January 1st, 1907. 
Special Correspondence. 

Work is progressing favorably on the property of the Manhattan-Nevada 
Gold Mines Company at Central. On the Georgey group drifting continues 
on the No. 4, east and west drift in good milling ore carrying much free gold. 
The main tunnel is still erosscutting the ledge to strike several veins which 
outcrop of the surface and which carry good values at the outcrop. There is 
enough ore blocked out in the workings on the Georgey group ,to keep a 
10-stamp mill busy one year. The Mammoth ledge recently opened up in 
the tunnel has been drifted on for 100 feet and the ore broken down has 
been of higher value than heretofore. The ledge has been crosscut in several 
places and averages 19 to 20 feet in width. So far as opened up at the present 
level, which is 250 feet from surface croppings the ore will make an average 
of $12 to the ton. In these workings drifting will be continued and winzes 
sunk. The management is preparing to drive a second tunnel from the north 
side of the hill. This will tap new ore bodies that have been discovered by 
surface prospecting on the north slope. This tunnel is expected to cut the 
Giant ledge which has been traced onto this ground. On the Copper Farm 
group of this company the main shaft has reached a depth of 55 feet. The 
whole bottom of the shaft is highly mineralized and gives increasing assays 
as depth is attained. 

The Manhattan-Giant, next adjoining the Manhattan-Nevada, has just 
made an important strike in its shaft at the 135-foot level. Crosscutting 
has been continued from this level without as yet having reached either wall. 
The strike is of much importance inasmuch as the ledge shows much strength 
and carries high values. The general strike of the vein indicates that it 
passes into the property of the Manhattan-Nevada Company's Georgey group. 

The Manhattan Mail says that the Tonopah Exploration Co. has let a con- 
tract for twenty miles of pipe which is to convey water to Manhattan from 
Jett canyon for municipal, domestic, and mill purposes. The contract is said 



I'ACIKIC MINING & nil. REPORTER. 



21 



to have been let :rrn and that the deliver} of Ihe pipe 

would follow as rapidly as possible. Work at J 

inabatcdly. A bountiful supply is assured from this 
imp is taking on an air of increased activity with the pros 

lug mill in the near future. Mr. J. EL ti. Wolf, tt uginccr m 

win-re. it is said, be is completing an 
tion of the mill, eontraets for which will be swarded 
in the immediate futon. 

A rich vein has been uncovered at the 175-fool level in the shaft of the 
Mustang mine, whicli entire bottom. An average sample taken 

feet of the vein assays $50 in gold to the ion. Superintendent J. 
C. Humphrey of the Mustang has always contended that depth would 
a mine, ami this theory has now been proven. Drifting will not at present 
BUneneed, it being the intention to continue sinking the shaft until the 
vein lias been ascertained. 

The Stray Dog Manhattan Mining Company has issue. 1 a statement over 
Signature of -its officials showing that during 1906 operations in the 
drift on the Monday Extension property continue to demonstrate that the 
property will be in the limelight this year. The ore body is strong and per- 
sistent and the work done proves that it carries remarkably uniform values. 
The M. onlay Extension lies west of and adjoining the Original Manhattan, 
08, the rich vein already opened up is traversed by other ledges that make 
it one of the premier properties of that rich section. 

Twenty feet a week is the record being made in tin' shaft cm the Nevada 
hern which is being sunk by contractors to a depth of 200 feet. 
Those familiar with the Nevada Southern ground, speak encouragingly 
of the future of the property. It occupies an enviable position in the heart 
of the rich and proven zone in the neighborhood of Central City, in the Man- 
hattan district. Thus far not a single failure has been recorded in that 
locality. Wherever consistent development has been done, flattering returns 
have resulted, as is proven by the operations. 

Superintendent Cram of the Manhattan Consolidated Extension Mining 
Company reports that in a winze at 173 feet from the surface the great 
60-foot vein was cut through showing 4 feet of $2,000 ore on the footwall. 
The ore is a schist permeated with free gold. The whole 4 feet at the point 
cut is practically specimen ore. Besides this high-grade, an immense body 
of milling ore is ready to be broken down and hoisted. 



GOLDFIELD 

Goldfield. Nevada. January 4th, 1907. — While the Hays-Monnett.e lease 
on the Mohawk, w-hich has but three days more to run, is taking out rich ore 
at the rate of $30,UU0 per day, and other leases on the wonderful Mohawk 
are yielding their quota, properties near at hand and at the most remote 
corners of the district are working night and day to develop ore bodies 
already uncovered on the one hand, and feverishly seeking the ore bodies on 
the other. Three or four leasers on the Kewanas property are in high grade 
ore and are sacking preparatory to shipment. Sacks of rich ore are piled 
on the dumps of the leases on the Midnight and Night Hawk claims, and 
the Grandma is the scene of much activity. On the August claim, several 
leasers are working, and two or three of the workings are in ore. 

On the Simmerone claim, adjoining the Blue Bull, the Simmerone Mining 
& Leasing Company has been formed, and are sinking a shaft to catch the 
rich ore bodies that have been opened on that ground. At present the shaft has 
reached a depth of 90 feet, and three veins have been cut, all returning good 
milling values. It is the intention of the company to sink to 200 feet before 
crosseutting or drifting. A gallows frame has been erected above the shaft, 
and the gasoline hoist will soon be on the ground. The Simmerone claim 
will be remembered as one of the leading strikes of the camp in the early 
days, when rich ore was carried across the desert to Tonopah, with armed 
men to guard the ore. A high fence was built around the claim to prevent 
stealing. 

An important deal was just recently consummated, by which the Homer 
Wilson Trust Company came into possession of the Crestone and Whale claims, 
but a short distance east of the Dixie, and adjoining the Nightingale group. 
Several strong ledges traverse the property, from which good assays have 
been obtained. It is understood this was one of the most desirable blocks 
of ground in the district that could be purchased. The consideration was not 
learned, although it was stated the purchase priee ran into five figures. 



This section oi the tioldfiel.l district, north to Diamot 
of great activity, aiel marly :i- m:m\ men are working I 
properties, as on tie producers nearer Goldfield. On thi 

property, several men are exploring a 12 foot lee . and 

which return D gold from the gras-. poinl 

to a producing mine there in th ire. 

tin the Bonanza claim of the Goldl 

in width was encountered at a depth of I" feet in theil al returned 

high-grade milling values, \ hoist is being erected on this pro] 

will i ntinued to depth and il re bodies systemati 

tin the Aurora claim, just a short distance south of Diamond 
workings are in high grade milling ore. Several Veil 

property. 

The same may be said of the Freedom claim, adjoining the Aurora. Several 

strong veins traverse the Freedom claim, and in sinking the company shaft 
to its present depth of loo feet, three or Pour veins wen 

pay quantities of gold, it is the intenti f the [Jnitei ind Gold 

field Mines Co., who control the Freedom claim, to crosscut to th 

veins at depth anil thoroughly explore their holdings. 

In and around Diamondfield, development work ; s being carried on 
with feverish haste to open the rich ore bodies that have alri adj been disclosed 
in the Daisy, .lunibo Extension, Great Bend, Quartzite, Black Butte, and 

others. All these last named properties are ill high-gr.-id v 

Word was just received from the Stlby Smelter in San Francisco that 
the grand total of $700,000, were the returns from 50 tons ..i' high-grade ore 
shipped from the llays-Monnotte lease on the Mohawk this week. The 
Frances Mohawk lease on the Mohawk shipped 25 Ions that returned $250,000, 
This is an unprecedented record of any oue property in the history of till 
mining world. 

GREENWATER 

Goldfield, Nevada, January 6th, 1907 

The rich Greenwater copper district is rapidly proving itself the largest 
ore zone in the history of copper mining. News came in last night nr a 
phenomenally rich copper strike on the property of S. K. Bradford and E. L. 
Hughes, located on the Death Valley side of the Greenwater district, but 
500 feet above the level of the Valley, and fully 12 miles from the town of 
Greenwater in a westerly direction. Three distinct leads have been uncovered 
ranging in width from 30 to 60 feet, and all carrying copper in marketable 
quantities, besides small amounts of gold and silver. One general assay 
across 25 feet of vein matter returned 14 per cent copper, 5 oz. silver and 
$3.40 gold. Picked samples have returned as high as 60 per cent copper. As 
soon as the news of the strike became known, a rush was made for that 
section of the district, and claims staked in every direction. This new strike 
will no doubt prove to be one of the bonanzas of the Greenwater district. 

In and around the camp of Greenwater, development work is being 
pushed rapidly, and large amounts of rich copper ore are being mined and 
the large ore bodies explored and blocked out. One of the most promising 
of the prospects in this vicinity is the Greenwater Bonanza Copper Company, 
owning the Bonanza group of claims about two miles east of the town of 
Greenwater, and surrounded by such properties as the Schwab Syndicate 
mines, John W. Gates property, Nixon-Wingfield holdings, Greenwater Bed 
Boy and Greenwater Saratoga. All of the properties named are in copper 
ore of a high grade. 

In the development of the Bonanza group, several leads have been un- 
covered, proving equally as good as those on its neighbors, and opening a 
field of unlimited possibilities. Machinery has been ordered and the properly 
equipped for deep mining, and the ore bodies will be developed in a systematic 
manner. Hoists are to be seen in every direction, and all workings are being 
pushed to open the ore bodies that are now known to exist from one end 
of the district to the other. 

Several new camps have been formed west from Greenwater, across Death 
Valley in the Slate Range of Mountains, and many good properties are being 
opened up. Ballarat will be remembered as a flourishing mining camp some 
years ago. Mills were erected and mines were opened up, and large quantities 
of ore were taken out. This district has again come to the front, and several 
new discoveries have been made, resulting in a stampede to this district, 
and claims have been located for miles around. Rich ore is being taken 
from surface prospects, whicli will cause development of many properties. 



Exports of Domestic Mineral Oil From the Pacific Ports of the United States, and Shipments to Alaska and 

Hawaii, During the Ten Months Ending October 31st, 1906. 



CUSTOMS DISTRICTS 
AND COUNTRIES 



Domestic E\ports- 

Alaska 

Los Angeles 

Puget Sound 

San Diego 

San Francisco 

Williamette 



Shipments to Alaska — 

From Los Angeles 

" Oregon, Ore. .. 

" Puget Sound 

" Sau Francisco . 

" Williamette 

Shipments to Han/all — 
From Los Angeles 

" Puget Sound ... 

" San Francisco . 



Total Domestic. 



MINERAL OIL 
CRUDE 



Gallons 



1,524,644 

2,812 

20,420 

800 



1,548.676 



100 
2,688,000 



1,932,000 



28,744,300 714.690 



42,159 
120 

548 

'5_ 



42,842 



9 
38,400 



43.90O 



MINERAL OIL, REFINED OR MANUFACTURED 



NAPHTHAS, ETC. 



ILLUMINATING 



Gallons 
22,980 



31.422 

5.336 

44,640 



I04,37S 



51,000 

4,290 

237.326 

230,068 

2.656 



85.250 

S.840 

345.Q25 



Dollars 
4,418 



4.031 

576 

9.099 



Gallons 
35.381 
no 
23,261 

9.955 
32,636,236 



18,124 32,704,943 



8,400 

574 
42,709 

3 s . 191 
379 



Dollars 

6,412 

16 

2,79' 

1.776 

1.330.567 



1.341.562 



1,100 
344.476 
163,464 

7.340 



128 

7LI43 

26.347 1 

1.263 



LUBRICATING, ETC. 



Gallons 
8.IOI 



111,054 

2,117 

148,426 

15 



269,713 



Dollars 
2,707 



20,025 

743 

40,908 

6 



64-389' 



75 
56,79 2 
11,871 

97 



22 

22,741 
4,317 
29 



RESIDUUM, ETC. 



9.709 
1,280 

48,049 



3.630 

.133.157 



1.553 
183.343 



8,411 
IS8.579 



3.o 2 4 
58.20S 



32.595 
4,020 
4,264 



40.879 



S40 



2,252 

243 
270 



2,765 



90 



22 



PACIFIC MINING- & OIL EEPOETEE. 



and a great revival of the old district. Notable among the new discoveries 
is that of the Ballarat Gold Mining Company, owning six claims about 18 
miles south of the town of Ballarat, from which good values have been 
obtained. The company is now sinking a shaft on a. six-foot ledge, from 
which assays have been taken from $40 to $150 per ton in gold. All veins 
are of a most permanent character, being between porphyry and granite, 
and the ore to date is. strictly free milling. 

In but a few months, there will be a chain of producing mines from 
Austin, Nevada, to Kandsburg, California. The open districts are fast closing 
by the announcements of new strikes in gold, silver and copper ores. Skidoo 
is another camp with great promise, located a short distance north of Ballarat 
and on the western side of Death Valley. Reports of phenomenally rich 
strikes are heralded from this new district, creating another rush, and 
gradually drawing the prospector south and closing the gap between Nevada 
and California. 

Wonder. 

Goldfield, Nevada, January 6th, 1907. 

A letter from Wallace MacGregor, consulting engineer of the Nevada 
Condors of Fairview and the Joe Wonder Mining Company of Wonder, states 
that mining operations in these two camps are assuming large proportions 
and many companies have opened large ore bodies since his last visit to 
the district a month ago. Both districts are expanding in size, and strikes 
have been made that stamp both as permanent mining camps. 

The showing on the Nevada Condors is exceedingly flattering. In the 
present workings, the vein has materially widened, the values have increased 
and the character of ore is such as to denote great permanency. All ore taken 
from the Nevada Condors is of good milling value while some of it runs 
into the thousands of dollars to the ton. The Nevada Condors lies in the 
heart of the rich Fairview district, and from present indications, should 
soon become an active producer. 

Every stage into Wonder is crowded to the guards. People are entering 
the new field from all sections of the state, and it is predicted that in three 
months' time, Wonder will have a population equal to any camp in the state, 
outside of Goldfield and Tonopah. 

New strikes are reported daily, and important mining deals, involving 
thousands of dollars, are constantly being made. Fabulous sums are being 
paid for favorably located mining ground, and the pioneers of the district 
are assured in having their camp thoroughly developed. No less than 40 
properties are in high-grade ore, some of which run as high as $10,000 to 
$15,000 per ton. The Nevada Wonder is the sensation of the camp. This 
company is sacking $1,000 ore in large quantities, preparatory to shipment. 
The Jack Pot is another producer of high-grade ore. The June Wonder, 
Daisy Wonder, Joe Wonder, Lucky Strike, and many others, are in line to 
soon become big mines. 

Mr. MacGregor announces his intention to prosecute development on the 
Joe Wonder to the limit, and open the ore bodies that have already been dis- 
covered, with rapidity. All the other companies are preparing for extensive 
work, and the Wonder district should soon develop into one of the foremost 
mining camps in the state of Nevada. 



INDEPENDENTS HOLD MEETING. 

Coalinga, Cal., January 5th, 1907. 
(Special to the Pacific Mining & Oil Reporter.) 
Independent Oil porducers met in Webb's Hall Friday afternoon and ap- 
proved the work of the previous meeting and listened to remarks from S. A. 
Guiberson, Superintendent of the Associated Oil Company at this place, in 
which he took up the matter of apparent discrepancies in the gauging of 
oil and requested that any errors or complaints to be noted be referred to 
him, and he assured those present of his entire willingness to fully invest- 
igate any complaints and rectify errors if there be any found. The spirit 
of those present was friendly to Mr. Guiberson but there was a general feeling 
of a wrong being done them by the method of gauging as now carried on by 
the company. Yet no one was able to talk definitely on that subject and 
a committee consisting of J. H. Webb and R. W. Dallas was appointed to 



make gauging tests and look into complaints and find where the error 
exists and report the same to the Association for it to take up and adjust. 

The meeting was well attended by the producers of this field and the 
feeling was general in favor of sustaining the organization. Many are not 
in position to contract at present but would be willing to do so through the 
Association as soon as they were through with present contracts. 

Sentiment was much against the sale of oil at prices offered and indicated 
that production would not be stimulated until better prices were offered. 

Secretary S. W. Morshead, who has been selected as selling agent, made a 
few remarks to the effect that he had seen several of the leading companies 
and had some good material to present to the Executive Committee of the Asso- 
ciation as soon as it should meet. Indications brought out in remarks were 
that Coalinga would soon be getting 35 to 40 cents for heavy oil. 

Shreeve Oil Company is in its oil sand with 4% -inch casing, having shut 
off the water successfully with the 6-inch. They expect to have the well 
producing in a few days now. 

California Oil Fields Ltd., has completed the purchase 6f Section 34-19-15 
and also Section 14. 

West Coalinga is going down steadily with its 12%, but progress is slow, 
as it has to be underreamed all the way. They are down about 450 feet. 

The Manchester is still going down with its 10-inch with every promise 
of success. 

The Wabash Oil Company is putting up rig No. 8. 

The properties on Section 6, taken over recently by Mr. Gutherie and 
associates, is preparing to start work and will be drilling soon. 

Feeling is much better than for some time in this place and work will 
be redoubled as soon as the long looked for price of oil is manifest. 

Michigan Oil & Development Company's well is going down steadily and 
every indication points to a good well that will open up a large field. They 
have encountered a heavy flow of water at a depth of over 1,000 feet and 
this shows strong indications of oil. Several directors and stockholders of 
the company will come out from the east this month to look over the property, 
with a view to enlarging on operations now in progress. 
SOUTHERN FIELDS. 

Annual resume of the Southern fields will, necessarily, appear in a 
subsequent issue of the Pacific Mining & Oil Reporter, on account of failure 
of correspondent to submit manuscript in time for this issue. 



PRODUCTION OF THE GULF COAST 


FIELD IN 1908. 








Texas and Louisiana (Estimated) 










In 


bbls. of 


42 Gallons 








Month 


Jennings 


Humble 


Batson 


Saratoga 


Sour La] 


ce Sp 'top 


Totals 


Jan 


. 693,200 


402,200 


273,000 


168,500 


201,500 


99,200 


1,837,600 


Feb 


. 625,000 


271,200 


243,000 


163,500 


208,300 


71,500 


1,582,500 


Mar 


. 614,100 


252,500 


256,000 


172,000 


205,000 


102,000 


1,601,600 


April . ... 


. 594,600 


265,000 


241,000 


202,000 


207,700 


102,000 


1,612,300 


May 


. 860,000 


360,000 


211,000 


245,000 


198,500 


91,000 


1,965,500 


June . ... 


. 750,000 


400,000 


210,000 


240,000 


195,000 


84,000 


1,S79,000 


July 


. 614,000 


390,000 


210,000 


230,000 


200,000 


80,000 


1,724,000 


Aug 


. 695,000 


295,000 


210,000 


205,000 


180,000 


75,000 


1,660,000 


Sept 


. 550,000 


253,000 


203,000 


208,000 


189,000 


69,000 


1,472,000 


Oct 


. 600,000 


225,000 


208,000 


215,000 


200,000 


90,000 


1,538,000 


Nov 


. 535,000 


215,000 


205,000 


235,000 


180,000 


85,000 


1,455,000 


Dee 


. 410,000 


195,000 


203,000 


262,000 


211,000 


86,000 


1,367,000 



Totals . .7,540,900 3,523,900 2,673,000 2,546,000 2,376,000 1,034,700 19,694,500 
In addition to the foregoing there was a production estimated at 100,000 
barrels from the Welsh, Anse la Butte and Caddo Districts in Louisiana, and 
250,000 barrels from the Hoskins Mound, Dayton and Matagorda Districts 
in Southeast Texas, making the total output of heavy oil for the year 
20,044,500 barrels. The production of the Corsieana, Powell, Henrietta and 
South Bosque fields, in northern and central Texas, is not considered as a 
part of the Gulf Coast output. It amounted to about 900,000 barrels in 1906, 
bringing the total yield of petroleum in Texas and Louisiana, during the year 
to about 21,000,000 barrels. 



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DRILLING RIGS and OIL WELL SUPPLIES 



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PACIFIC MINING & nil. REPORTER. 



23 



UNION OIL COMPANY PROSPERS. 



Thf following circuit! iod from the genera] office to the stock 

impany of California, shows the corporation to bo 
in n most thriving condition and it^ fa tare prospects even brighter timn its 
brilliant past. Th. Union is th. largest producing and marketing oil com- 
pany in tho world: 
To the itoekholdei ompanv of California: 

With the parmenl of the present dividend, tho amount thus far disbursed 
la two and one quarter millions of dollars. 
our general information, we beg to advise yon that for more than 
r a large amount of the company's production has been shut in, and 
quently greatly restricted, owing to the lack of water trans- 
'ion. This condition ifl now in :i measure relieved, and will soon he fully 
relieved. The steamship Lansing, one of the six vessels which tho company 
purchased last winter, is now in commission, carrying oil on this const, and 
tho steamer Santa Maria, another of the vessels purchased is now en route 
to this coast, and her sister ship, the Santa Rita, is expected to be also en 
route westward within the next month. The aggregate carrying capacity of 
Is is nearly l.'.O.OOO barrels of oil. These, added to the fleet 
of vt-ss. Is already in e< Pacific coast, will give the com- 

pany very substantial relief. 

The largo additions which are being made to the company's oil refinery 
at Oleum, have been delayed throughthe unsatisfactory labor conditions which 
prevailed on San Francisco bay, but are now nearing completion, and the works 
will in a short time, be in full operation. 

The isthmian pipe line is nearing completion, and will provide an outlet 
for nil the oil for which the company can provide water transportation. With 
those enlarged facilities for transporting and marketing oil, the company's 
well?, many of which have been shut in, can be opened, thereby very largely 
increasing the company's income. 

Xotwithstanding the unsatisfactory market conditions which have pre- 
vailed we are pleased to advise you that the company has many million bar- 
rels of oil sold for future delivery at satisfactory prices, and assurance of 
the sale of many millions more through the isthmian line and in South America, 
at even more remunerative prices. 

The company has also secured by purchase the control of several thousand 
acres of rich oil lands in the Santa Maria and Fullerton oil fields. 

The general outlook, therefore, for the company 's business, though always 
encouraging, is brighter, we think than ever before in its history. 

Lyman Stewart, President. 



Empire Gold Mines Limited. 

This property consists of 680 acres of valuable placer and quartz claims, 
a good portion of which is covered with excellent timber. It is located iu 
Gold Valley, on a branch of the North Yuba river, Sierra County. 

This mine has been developed to a depth of 500 feet by an inclined shaft 
from which drifts have been run on the vein at every 100 feet. A tunnel has 
also been extended into the hill, several hundred feet above the mouth of the 
shaft, from which some of the richest ore in the mine has been exposed. Th'3 
lower levels are also showing up exceptionally well. Prom the first level, 
which comes to the surface at the mill, to the crest of the hill above, there Is 
over 800 feet of backs. 

The Empire is fully equipped with a modern plant for the milling and 
treating of its ore. It has a 25-stamp mill, with a daily capacity of about 
100 tons. It has also a chlorination plant for the treatment of the concen- 
trates. Its hoists, compressor, and other appurtenances are of the latest type. 
Power for the operation of the mine is generated by electricity. The com- 
pany's water power plant is located some distance below the mine, where is 
also its dynamos. The company has a saw mill which supplies an abundance 
of sawed timber for the property. It is one of the few camps where everything 
required for its operation is to be found on the ground. 

The Empire Gold Mines Limited is located in the rich mineral belt which 
crosses Sierra County from south-east to north-west, averaging more than 
twenty miles in width. This belt consists of several distinct zones, distinguish- 
able by the character of the ore and the nature of the country rock. The 
most notable of these zones passes through the central portion of the county, 
near Sierra City, running northwesterly through the Gold Lake and Gold 
Valley region, to and beyond the famous Plumas-Eureka mine just across the 
Plumas county line. The quartz veins of this zone are situated within and 
along each side of a belt of quartz porphyry, about one mile in width. These 
veins have a northwest strike and a dip of about fifty degress to the northeast- 
Two miles east of this zone is another, on the contact between the slates of 
the west ami the granite of the east. Most of this contact, however, is covered 
with gravel deposits. A third zone crosses the country in a northwesterly 
direction, between Downieville and Sierra City. The zone is ten miles in 
width and consists of alternate bands of clay slates, quartzite, and porphyry. 
West of this zone is a band of serpentine passing through Forest City, Good- 
year Ear and Poker Flat. Most of the discoveries on this contact have been 
made by drift miners working under the lava capped ridges, but many valu- 
able discoveries have been made in the neighborhood of Allaghney where 
Kanaka Creek has been prospected. 

Murchie Mine. 

This property embraces a large acreage of patented quartz and placer 
claims. Topographically the country is rolling hills, covered with an abundance 
of good timber. Deer Creek traverses the holdings of the company affording 
a good water supply for the operation of the mine and mill. The mine is 
situated about two miles from Nevada City, Nevada County, California. 



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carried in stock at all our stores 



CASING 



Size 


Weight 


Size 


Weight 


5^ inches 


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q5/& inches 


33 'bs 


6^4 inches 


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1 1-5/8 inches 


40 lbs 


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THE NATIONAL SUPPLY COMPANY 

117 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

BRANCH STORES 

Coalinga, Cal. BakersfLeld, Cal. Orcutt, Cal. 

TUBULAR BOILERS 



Large Dome 
Dry Steam 
Assured 
Full 
Capacity 




Easy access 

to every 

part for 

Cleaning, 

Examination 

and 

Repairs 



Stock of Boilers from 25 ti, p. to 90 h, p. on band for immediate delivery 

Made of best Flange Tested Steel. Tubes of best American manufacture and of 
standard gauge: Rivets of best quality; Fixtures heavy and durable. Every 
boiler complete, including following fixtures and fittings: Half arch front, com- 
plete with fire and ash doors 17x17 inches, with draft dampers ; anchor bolts 
for front gates and bearers ; rear arch bars ; cleanout door and frame ; wall- 
plates and rollers ; smoke stack and guy wire; pop safety valve; steam gauge 
and syphon ; water column of large capacity, complete with water gauge and 
three gauge cocks ; blow-off cock ; feed valve and check valve with nipples. 

Portable outfits and everything: required for drilling or boring: 
Test Wells. Brass Goods, Fitt;ng-s and Valves of all descriptions. 



Write for prices 



R. H. HERRON CO., affiliated with the 

OIL WELL SUPPLY CO. 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

212 North Los Angeles St. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Ill Townsend 8t. 



24 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER. 



BOND'S MARKET LETTER 

Each week W. F. Bond and Company, the oldest established brokerage house 
in Goldfield, issue an exhaustive, unbiased and thoroughly reliable resume of 
physical conditions at the mines, with present and probably future movements 
of the stocks, of every district in Nevada. It is an authentic summary of 
reports from their own field men, who invade every section of the state, and is 

MAILED FREE ON REQUEST 

Messrs. Bond and Company are members of the mining stock exchanges of 
Goldfield, Reno and San Francisco. References, any bank in Southern Nevada, 
R. G. Dun & Co. and the American National Bank in San Francisco. Ask 
for their private telegraph code. They also use the Western Union and 
the Bedford-McNeil. 

Add Your Name to Their Mailing List To-Day 

W. F. BOND and COMPANY 

GOLDFIELD, NEVADA 



The Murchie vein is a true fissure. It has been developed by a three 
compartment shaft to a depth of about 850 feet, improving greatly. A great 
amount of underground development work has been done. It is now the 
intention of the company to carry the shaft down to a depth of 1,200 feet for 
the purpose of blocking out the ore. Drifting will be carried on from the 900, 
1,000, 1,100, and 1,200 foot levels, and should result in blocking out a large 
amount of ore. 

Surface equipment at the Murchie consists of a thoroughly modern 20- 
stamp mill with a daily capacity of about 100 tons, a complete concentrating 
plant, canvas plant, compressors, pump and hoist of sufficient capacity to 
continue the development of the mine to a great depth; assay office, super- 
intendent 's office, and other buildings. 

Mr. J. C. Campbell, superintendent, is one of the state's best known mining 
men. The management is in the hands of well known San Francisco men who 
have been successful in the development of the industries of the west. 
Murchie Extension. 

The Murchie Extension is operating on a tract of 491 acres consisting of 
seven located mining claims, the balance being patented land, located near 
Nevada City, Cal. It is one of the largest individual holdings in the state 



and gives much promise for the future. It adjoins the well known Banner and 
Murchie mines, and the same rich veins are supposed to traverse it. 

Development is being prosecuted vigorously in three localities. One shaft 
has been opened up to a depth of 300 feet on the vein with drifts, all in good 
milling ore. For the small amount of work done it shows up as well as any 
mine in the district. The ledge is widening out rapidly as depth is attained. 
On the 300 north the ledge is particularly strong, being five feet between the 
walls, a part of which assays very good values. 

This vein is a true fissure, which is the general character of all of the 
mines of this district. Mr. J. C. Campbell, one of the best known mining men 
in the state, states that, in his opinion, the Murchie Extension is the making of 
one of the richest mines in Nevada County. 

At one of the other mining localities where work is being carried on, a 
hoist has been erected, and sinking and drifting is being done on a vein that 
shows up well in milling values. Trenching and sinking on a vein is being 
carried on in the third location with gratifying results, the ledge showing 
much free gold. Altogether more than 3,000 feet of development work has 
been done on this property. 



Hammond 
Iron Works 

Warren, Pa. 

u. s. A. 

Builders of 

Steel Tanks 

of the 

Highest 

Grade 




Stills 

Condensors 

Agitators 

General 

Oil Refinery 

Work 



SALES AGENTS 

Herman Nieter 

29 Broadway 
New York. 

Krumbhaar&Aiken 

201 Defiegre Building 
New Orleans 



PACIFIC MINIM, & oil. REPORTER. 



25 



The Strike is Settled 



The temporary labor trouble in Goldfield depressed the prices in 
mining stocks for a time. As soon u the trouble was Battled prices 

a-lvanooil. ."., LO anil 20 eenl as high as $i :i share. Nevada 

now li.-is the greatest mines in the history of the world. 

PICK THE WINNERS. 

It i» on! b piek the winners; no) as s man would pick 

the bone to win in a ran-, but it is .>nr business t<> knnw the mines and 
the men who control them, ti> knew the market. There is no better 
evidence of our ability to »h> tins than the dividend and profit-sharing 
checks that we have been paying to our customers for almost a your. 
The highest monthly dividend we have paid during this time is ::.~> per 
cent and the lowest two per cent. 

\\'e positively know of tour Btoeks at Qoldfield, possibly five, that 
we can guarantee will advance not less than 50 per cent in 90 days 
We know three in Tonopab that will ilouble in less than one year. We 
know six at Bullfrog that will advance 30 to 100 per cent in a tew 
months. There are a number of good mines in Manhattan whose stock 
we know will advance to at least double "before the robins nest again.' 1 
Do not write us and ask for the names of these companies because we 
will not give them to yon. THIS INFORMATION IS FOR OUR 



( I SI'DMKKS. This information has cost U l tort am! study 

anil many thousand dollars. kfost brokers tell you l hey will gi\ > 

Such information for nothing. Nowadays, a man v. I x| is to get 

Something for nothing gets hit. 

Above all things remember that it is of just as much im] an 

to select the right broker as to select the right sto'-ks. We guarantee 
absolutely and unconditionally that for every dollar you place in our 
hands for investment we will render a prompt and satisfi tervice 

or refund your money. WE BUY AND SELL Aid. THE NEVADA 

STOCKS IX ANY SIZMD BLOCKS. We advise against purchasing i 

stocks. There are too many good ones. 

It will interest a great many of our customers to know that tin' 
AMERICAN DUCHESS OIL COMPANY will, before any great length 
of time elapses, enter the dividend-paying class. It is a good producer. 
A local refinery is taking the oil at the well at $1.50 per barrel. Also, 
the BULLFROG EXTENSION MINING COMPANY has developed sev 
eral million tons of ore; a railroad is being graded across the property; a 
station will be laid out. It will be one of the big mines. 

We are in the market for all stocks, to buy or sell, and solicit a 
part of your business. We have as good banking and commercial refer- 
ences as any brokerage house in Ameriea. 



Debenture Surety Company, Inc. 



Suite 2, 2597 Sutter Street 



San Francisco, California 



The 300-foot shaft is equipped with hoist, water power plant, compressor, 
and a complete camp for the men. Within the next few months a stamp mill 
will be erected, its installation being fully warranted by the amount of milling 
ore the mine is now producing and which is being blocked out. It is believed 
that the present output of the mine will keep a ten-stamp mill running con- 
stantly, with the assurance of a material increase as depth is attained. 

Extensive development will be carried on in several additional localities 
on the property in order to expose and develop many veins known to traverse 
it. From the showing already made, together with the proximity of the 
property to other rich mines, the outlook for the Murchie Extension is par- 
ticularly pleasing. 



WESTERN EXTENSION OF THE CuALINGA FIELD. 

The very promising indications at the Michigan Oil & Development 
Company's test well on Section 8-19-13 point to a well of large capacity, if 
not a gusher. 

The fact is evident that Mr. C. Willard Hall, the promoter of the above 
company has just secured the holdings of the White Creek Oil Company, 



which practically gives him control of all of the available lands (outside of 
the Southern Pacific Company's holdings) in Townships 19-13 and 19-14. He 
has also lately taken in several thousand acres in Townships 20-13, 20-14 and 
19-12. 

Mr. Hall's acquaintance with the geological formations and the general 
subject of mineralogy and the fact that he is staking so much in this new 
perspective extension of the Coalinga field makes it worthy of consideration. 
Aside from the Michigan Company above named which is on a solid finan- 
cial basis, he is now organizing three new companies, of the same caliber aa 
the Michigan Company. These new companies will be operating in the western 
extension within a few days. We have looked the White Creek (Western ex- 
tension) over and class it as very promising for the prospector and investor. 

We look for great results in this part of the Coalinga field and sin- 
cerely hope that Mr. Hall and his associates will meet with the success that 
is due all great hustlers. Mr. Hall has been identified with the Coalinga 
field for the past seven years and the many business men thai, have dealt 
with him and the large number that have been in his employ all speak in 
his praise and wish him success. 



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Manufacturers of 



Steel Water Pipe 
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Oil Stills 



OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 

Works: Cor. New Main and Date Streets, Baker' Block P. O. Box 231, Station C. Telephone Main 196 

Offiee, 334 North jviain Street, Iios Rngeles, Cal. 



26 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER. 



BIG COALINGA LAND DEAL. 

Balfour Guthrie & Company purchase large additional holdings for the 
California Oilfields Limited. More than a million of dollars involved. 

One of the most gigantic deals ever carried through in the State has just 
been consummated by Balfour Guthrie & Co., by the terms of which several 
of the most valuable producing oil properties in the Coalinga field have been 
added to the holdings of the California Oilfields Limited, which, already was 
the largest individual producer and operator in that particular field. The 
papers were filed in Fresno on the 3rd inst. The transaction is said to 
involve a cash consideration of $1,280,000 a part of which has already been 
paid over to the agent for the individual companies. 

The first movement in this deal was published in the columns of^ the 
Pacific Mining & Oil Eeporter some ten months ago at the time Shirley 
Ward was taking options of the various properties. As stated at the time, 
the options, which originally expired on July 1st last but which were renewed, 
called for a cash consideration of $1,000 per acre and it is upon this basis 
that the various properties involved in the transaction were taken over by 
the purchasing company. To Mr. Ward goes the credit of carrying through 
the deal. 

The entire land holdings involved comprise about 1280 acres, the indi- 
vidual properties now being known as follows: 

Oyama 40 acres 1 producing well 

Pittsburg Coalinga . ... 40 " 2 " 

Westmoreland Coalinga .40 " 3 

McCreary 40 " 1 " " 

Starr 60 " 

Forty 40 " 2 " " 

Thirty-Pour 240 " 

Avon 320 " 2 " 

Kaweah 320 " 2 " 

Shirley Ward 80 " 

O Heath 40 " 

Missouri Coalinga 20 " 1 " 



that a still greater advance will take effect. The Associated Oil Company 
is now paying .27% c. per barrel for contract oil with a fixed quantity, and 
25 c. per barrel on daily runs in the Coalinga and Kern River fields, against 
18 c. for both last January and 15 c. a year and a half ago. With the advance 
in price, and the opportunity for all in a strong competitive market, several 
strong companies are getting into shape to market their own product. The 
policy of the California Oilfields Limited seems to be one of keeping in 
line with the general spirit of progressiveness in the oil business. 



Total 



.1,280 acres 



14 producing wells 



This acquisition, together with the already large holdings of the Cali- 
fornia Oilfields Limited, makes the company one of the five or six largest 
producers in the State, and it is intimated that it will soon be shipping its 
production to tidewater through its own pipe-line — another company added 
to the great independent movement in California at the present time. There 
is a rumor that the pipe-line will run along the route of the Dallas line, 
surveyed and rights of way secured some two years ago, but this report can- 
not be confirmed. This route is one of the most feasible from the field. 
Its tidewater terminus is at Alviso, on San Francisco Bay, where a wharf and 
refinery site were secured at the time of the survey. 

While no absolutely definite news can be secured regarding the con- 
struction of a refinery it is believed that the present expansion policy of 
the California Oilfields Limited includes a provision for one, also tank steam- 
ers and distributing stations. It is known that the company is negotiating 
the purchase of still greater holdings in the Coalinga field. It is said that 
over 5,000 acres of proven property is involved in the second transaction, 
together with a considerable production. If the "Limited" puts in a pipe 
line it will doubtless be an eight-inch one, fully capable of carrying 20,000 
barrels of oil daily. It is evidently the intention of the company to provide 
itself with sufficient territory to assure this output for many years. 

At the general office of the company in San Francisco all questions 
regarding the building of a pipe line are evasively answered, it being stated 
that the company intends to simply acquire additional proven territory and 
hold the production until such a time as it can secure a reasonable price for 
it. This may be true, but the pipe line theory is the one generally accepted. 

It is said that this course on the part of the California Oilfields Limited 
lias been occasioned by the oppressions of the Standard Oil Company, which, 
although it contracted a part of the output of the former company at a good 
price, has been paying but .22% c. for the principal part of that company's 
outpixt for the past two years, and its wells have been mostly shut down of 
late. The Limited evidently believes to be entitled to a reasonable profit 
from its business and, in view of the greatly increased demand for oil, 
believes that it will at all times find a ready sale at good prices. The price 
of oil has been steadily advancing for some time past, being at least 30 per 
cent higher today than it was a year ago. As soon as delivery commences 
on the recent large contracts with the Japanese it is confidently expected 



MT. PINAL OIL FIELD 

By A. S. COOPER, C. E., M. E. 
Mount Pinal oil field is about nine miles south of Santa Maria, Santa 
Barbara County. 

On Mount Pinal a large number of productive wells have been drilled to 
a depth of from 2000 to 3000 feet. Some of these wells are gushers. The 
strata composing Mount Pinal forms an irregular dome. Surmounting this 
dome, is a dome shaped bed or stratum of sand some fifty or sixty feet 
thick. Numerous small canyons have been added into the sides of this dome. 
Beneath the sand bed oil stratum are strata of soft shale. In many places 
this soft shale is impregnated with heavy bitumen. Some oil sands are found 
in this shale, but are of little value as a source of oil. Veins of asphaltum are 
iritended from below into fissures that have opened in this shale. Some of 
these fissures have produced asphaltum in commercial quantities. The oil 
from which this asphaltum was formed must have ascended from a depth 
of over two thousand feet, as wells 'drilled in the vicinity of these fissures 
do not develop oil in any great amount until reaching that depth. 

Underlying there, soft shale, at a depth of about two thousand feet 
are silicified and bitoumo-silicified shales. These shales were once ordinary 
shales that have been silicified and bitumo-silicified by hot alkaline solutions. 
These shales are very hard and will cut glass, some of them will scratch quartz. 
These shales are cracked, seamed and fissured, which permits petroleum oil to 
ascend from profound depths and also act as a reservoir for the storage of the 
oil. Beneath these hard oil sands may exist, but up to the present time they 
have not been reached. 

When broken to various degrees of fineness by the bit, operatives in this 
oil field wrongly call these ground up shales sand. When examined under 
a microscopic glass, these small fragments of shale are seen to be angular 
and are not rounded as is the ease with ordinary sand, besides they show the 
flinty lustre and color of silicified and bitumo-silicified shale, consequently 
the claim that yielding wells in this field penetrate four or five hundred 
feet of oil sand is without foundation. In this field a gushing well will cease 
to gush or its flow be greatly diminished when another well is drilled in its 
neighborhood and strikes the fissure at a more advantageous point than where 
the first well drilled struck the fissure. 

A number of unproductive wells have been drilled in this field near 
producing wells. This was probably owing to the fact that they did not 
encounter any crevice or fissure. If these dry wells had been 4-shot with 
nitro-glycerine they might have been opened to a fissure and proved productive. 
Wells yielding but a small flow of oil may yield a much larger flow after being 
shot. A heavy earthquake shock has been known to increase the flow of a 
well and cause a barren well to yield oil. 

In California there are no pockets of free natural gas as is commonly sup- 
posed. All natural gas is in solution, either with petroleum oil or water. When 
pressure on a body of oil or water is decreased by being penetrated by a well, 
gas is not only liberated near the surface of the oil or water, but is liberated 
at the same time at great depths, especially is this true where fissures exist. 
The liberated gas ascending through the column of water or oil in the well 
lengthens the same and the water or oil is thrown from the well if the pres- 
sure of the gas is sufficient. The amount of gas liberated gradually decreases 
until finally to obtain oil, water and gas the well will have to be pumped. 

Through analysis it is found that gas liberated from solution with water 
contains but little of the liquid hydrocarbons and considerable moisture, 
whereas, gas liberated from oil contains a notable amount of gasoline and no 
moisture. The natural gas in the Mount Pinal field contains a large amount 
of gasoline, sometimes as high as one gallon of gasoline to each thousand 
feet of gas, clearly showing that this gas is being released from a large body 
of oil and not water. 

There are thousands of feet of natural gas containing gasoline going 
to waste in the Mount Pinal field. The gasoline could be profitably removed 
from the gas but not by aerial condensation as some think. 



Capitalization 

$1,500,000.00 


Dutchman Creek of Nevada 
Gold Mining Company 


1,500,000 Shares 

Par Value $1 Each 


Treasury Stock 

575,000 Shares 


Fully Paid and 

Non-Ass essable 




Incorporated Under the Laws of Arizona 




THE COMPANY ANNOUNCES ITS FIRST OFFERING OF STOCK TO INVESTORS-50,000 SHARES WILL BE SOLD AT 

25c— TWENTY-FIVE CENTS — 25c 

the proceeds of which will be devoted to further development work. Dutchman Creek of Nevada Gold Mining Co. owns three full claims paid in full and deeded to the company; 
located in the great "Walker Lake Mining District," Nevada, and adjoining the famous old "Dutchman" mine on the west upon which a strike has just been made assaying $1 
a pound or $2,000 a ton. Three ledges on our property show assays of $101.21, $30.75, $15.26. WIRE YOUR ORDERS AT ONCE. 


POMEROY SECURITIES COMPANY, Incorporated 

| FISCAL AGENTS 

1 San Francisco Office, 1300 Golden Gate Avenue 



PACIFIC MINING & oil. REPORTER. 



27 



Hallwood Cash Registers 

Price SI 20, F. 0. B. San Francisco, Cal. 

This cash register is the 
lu-st on llie mnrket.nnil w<' 
are the rxrlusivr 
dealers. This particular 
register ns shown, rc-i<i>.- 
trrs from f> cents Up <" 
$5.95. total capacity 
9a Upright key 
DOardi rcleasahle 23 value 
kc\s. rotary indicators, 
showing hoth bock and 
front. A counter and 
lock is attached to I In- lid 
covering the adding 
mechanism preventing any 
interfering with the rec- 
ords. Another counter 
shows the number of cus- 
tomers waited on. A total 
adder, solid brass cabinet, 
heavily nickle or gold 
nish. We also carry sec- 
ond hand Nationals. All 
registers are sold on easy 
monthly payments, or lib- 
eral discount for cash. K you are considering the purchase of a cosh register of any 
make, write us, we can save you money. 

PACIFIC COAST CASH REGISTER CO. 




1 6 City Hali Square 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY 



DON'T INVEST IN 

GOLDFIELD 



Don't invest in Greenwater. Don't invest in any 
Nevada security until you know what you are doing. 
Ascertain the facts always before investing. I have been 
personally in Nevada for nearly three years and am familiar 
with all the leading districts. I have representatives in 
every camp throughout the entire state. 

You can keep thoroughly in touch with the mines and 
the market of Nevada by reading my 

MARKET LETTER 

which is issued weekly and sent ABSOLUTELY FREE 
upon request. My clients are making tremendous profits. 
Why not you ? Get in line for profitable investments. 
Write me today. 

G. S. JOHNSON, Broker 

62 Nixon Block Goldfield, Nevada 



BANK OF SANTA MARIA 

Capital and Surplus $150,000.00 

The Pioneer Bank of the Oil Regions 

Solicits the Accounts of OH Men and Investors 



Chas. Bradley, President 

B. Pczzoni, Vice-President 

Paul O. Tietzen, Manager and Cashier 

L. P. Scaroni, Assistant Cashier 



Santa Maria 

California 



BARLOW & HILL 
MAP MAKERS 



Bakersfield, 



California. 



GEO. H. BUSH 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 
Qolden Gate Avenue San Francisco, California 

Bakersfield, California. 



A. S. COOPER, C. E., M. E. 

GEOLOGIST AND MINERALOGIST 

L'liLll Ililiegras Avenue Berkeley, California 



CRESCENT BLUE PRINT CO. 

MINING MAPS 
Blue Prints and Tracing 

Tel. Franklin 773. 



G12 O'Farrell Street 



San Francisco, California 



HENRY C. DEMMING 

MINING ENGINEER 
Geologist Mineralogist and Chemist 
79 wells located without a "duster" 



15-17 North Third Street. 



Harrisburg, Pa. 



CHARLES GREEN 

DRAFTSMAN 

General Drafting and Tracing— BLUE PRINTS— Fine Map Work a 

Specialty. 

Telephone Berkeley 161 

2430 Channing Way Berkeley, California 



CHARLES F. HUMPHREY 

Attorney at Law 

Suite 32 St. Mingo Bldg. 

1300 Golden gate Avenue San Francisco, California. 



J. M. NESBIT, Attorney 

PATENTS 

United States and Foreign Trade Marks Registered 

921 Park Building Pittsburg, Pennsylvania 



California Fortune Stockholders 

The company's mailing list having been de- 
stroyed by the fire, all stockholders who paid 
Assessment No. 2 (last assessment), please send 
in present address. 

California Fortune Oil Company 

Suite 27, St. Mungo Building 
1300 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 



28 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER. 



OIL, OIL BURNERS, AND OIL BURNING. 

By Staples and Pfeiffer. 
• With the marvelous development of the California and Texas oil fields 
and the ease and modern facilities of transporting oil from the wells to She 
furnace, together with the saving in cost of fuel, space and weight are the 
principal reasons for the recent changes in our steam plants, vessels, railroads, 
breweries, bakeries, hotels, laundries, and, in fact, all description of steam 
and electric plants from burning coal to that of fuel oils. 

This change has been made, too, at a saving of from 25 to 75 per cent, 
depending on the distance from the source of supply, the apparatus used and 
the sensible and economical handling of same. This transition is certainly 
an agreeable one, from dust, dirt, ashes, soot and smoke to cleanliness, labor- 
saving and a more general air of prosperity around the plant. 

Practically all the California and Texas fuel oils contain more or less 
water, sand, asbestos, fibre, marsh gas, etc.; some grades flowing free, while 
others are more tenacious, though of lighter gravity, while still others are a 
mixture of light and heavy oils, forming and carrying an oil gas in solution, 
causing trouble at the pumps. 

In general: 

The gravities range from 14 to 20 Beaume. 

The heat units range from 16,000 to 22,000. 

The per cent of sulphur from 1 to 3. 

The per cent of water from 1 to 5. 

The per cent of steam to atomize from 2 to 5 per pound of water evapo- 
rated. 

The per cent of air to atomize from Yt C. F. at 20 pounds pressure per 
pound of water evaporated. 

The per cent of air to atomize from 4 C. F. at 1 pound pressure per pouud 
of water evaporated. 

One gallon of oil weighs 7.6 pounds; 1 barrel of 42 gallons equals 320 
pounds, 3% to 4 barrels or 1,200 pounds, or 24 C. F. equal 1 ton of coal. A 
saving of 50 per cent in weight, 75 per cent in space, and possibly 25 to 75 
per cent in money over coal. 

A neat, compact, self-contained oil-pumping system,. installed by practical 
mechanics or firm of good reputation is a continued source of pride and a 
pleasure to handle, combined with the positive, instant and absolute control 
of the fire, from its start, to the highest efficiency of the boilers. The oii 
heater should be of cast iron with flanged head, body of heater tapering off, 
forming a firm base by which to fasten it down, the base at the same time 
acting as a settling chamber to blow off all dirt and water which will precip- 
itate from the heating of the oil. The upper portion of heater carrying drip- 
pan at least twice the capacity of oil end of pumps, an important point in a 
rush overhauling job. 

Two duplex pumps fastened in drip-pan, pumps fitted with split rings, 
metal valves for oil lift, lead or fibre gaskets brass cross connections in one 
piece with valves and ground joint unions next to pumps so one pump can be 
overhauled while the other is in use; pumps to discharge to air chamber, and 
through heater to burners. 

Self -cleaning strainer, oil meter; thermometer and by-pass on line, if 
desired; a special Automatic Regulating relief valve or pump governor, or 
both, are good investments towards a steady oil feed to the burners. 

The air chamber must be absolutely tight, having no air cock, valve or 
plug in or near the top to let the air escape and chamber fill with oil. A 
small air relief pipe from bonnets of pumps is also appreciated if oil has gas 
in solution in starting up. Have an extra heavy copper coil fitted to and 
through flanged head of heater, thus having no joints to cause leaks inside of 
heater. 

Exhaust of pumps or live steam should pass through copper coil in heater 
to heat oil in heater, exhaust of coil to feed water heater, condenser or atmos- 
phere as desired. 

All valves on suctions from tanks, discharge, by-pass, relief, strainer, 
pump governor gauges and all details to be next to pumps, and not scattered 
here and there. 

Steam to burners must be dry and of steady pressure; if Air is used, be 
sure to have compressor large enough to save running at high speed, having 
large receiver to insure a steady pressure. 

Before starting up be certain that all pipes are thoroughly blown one, 
although the scale and dirt in a new system may cause trouble for a week or 
more. As to furnace arrangements and burners, that is a delicate question; 
all having different views and ideas. 

A proper burner will superheat, pulverize and vaporize the steam and )il 
through a series of mixing chambers into an Oil Gas before it leaves the slotted 
tip, the oil gas lights and burns close to tip with a soft, clean, steady flame, 
just the same as a large gas jet and is as easily controlled by one valve, and 
is self-cleaning in its action. 

As suchiv a burner has no ejector, injector, siphon, steam-jet or blow-pipe 
action, the combustion is in the furnace, not up the stack. Being a pure oil 
gas fire it causes no leaky tubes or seams, and gives the highest efficiency 
without the need of superheating or extension fronts, brick or checkerwork, 
etc., as the burner is complete in itself, and the furnace arrangement 
is simply to control the free air admitted for combustion. 

In starting up, open dampers, which should be fitted to fall open, not 
closed, as a safeguard in case of accident with it, often bad results. Start 
pump to circulating oil; blow out the burner and leave steam on lightly to 
warm it up; place lighter in furnace near burner tip, open oil valve slightly, 
and as the oil gas ignites regulate valves to suit fire wanted, withdrawing the 
lighter and regulating ash pan damper for proper amount of air for combustion. 

If too much steam or air is used with which to atomize it will show a 
short, stringy, roaring fire. If too little steam or air is used, it shows in a 
dull, dead, smoky fire. Too much air at ash pan damper shows a sparkling 
light to bluish smoky flame, with a tendency to blow up and away from 
air inlet. 

Too little air at ash pan damper causes the dull, dead fire, again with the 
addition of shaking and drumming of doors, breeching and stack, and a pos- 
sible explosion of uneonsumed gases with its natural results. 

As to the effect of oil on boilers, that depends on details. If your tube 
ends are burnt off, or they and the seams leak, it is the fault of the burner 
that plasters your furnace and combustion chamber full of uneonsumed oil, 



What One of Our Advertisers Says 



San Francisco, Cal. December 27, 1906. 
E. S. Eastman, Managing Editor, 

Pacific Mining & Oil Eeporter, 

1300 Golden Gate Avenue, City. 
Dear Sir: — 

We believe, in justice to you and your publication, we should 
give you this unsolicited letter which ought to be and probably 
will be of considerable interest to everyone who does adver- 
tising. 

Our Advertising Manager, at one time, made the mistake 
that is quite common to all, the mistake of placing an adver- 
tisement in a publication two or three times and when he failed 
to get returns, would cancel the advertisement. We have 
found that it takes several months and sometimes several years 
to make real good money out of advertising. We proved this 
conclusively with your publication and after using it continu- 
ously for two years, changing our ads frequently, sometimes 
running two or three inches, sometimes a page or so and by 
keying the ads and thus proving the business brought to us, we 
figured up results and were agreeably surprised to find that 
taken as a whole on all the money invested over a period of two 
years, it represented a little less than 8 per cent commission on 
the stock sold by the ads. 

This will appear remarkable to the old time advertiser who 
knows that stock sales made through public advertising are 
a very expensive proposition, ordinarily costing many times the 
amount above mentioned. One man in Canada read our ad- 
vertisement for a year before he bought a share of stock and 
then his first order was for 10,000 shares. We had many simi- 
lar instances, the orders coming from all parts of the country, 
many from foreign countries. 

We got more real value from your paper than we did from 
a score of big metropolitan dailies and the cost was very small 
in comparison. We want to congratulate you on having a 
splendid paper,, a result getter and a business puller, and for 
having the splendid business judgment and foresight to add a 
mining section to your paper which we sincerely hope you will 
push and develop. The whole world is intensely interested in 
the great mines of Nevada. 

Results have been so good that, we feel justified in giving 
this letter to you to be used as you see fit. 
Respectfully yours, 
Debenture Surety Company (Incorporated) 

J. E. Kerr, Manager 



City Livery Stable 

Hauling of Every Description Done 

A full line of Hardwood Lumber. 
Blacksmithing Done at Standard Prices. 
A full line of Single and Double Rigs. 

Cheney Brothers Coalinga, Cal. 

Coalinga 
Iiivefy and peed Stables 

LOUIS MERRILL, Prop. 

DEALER IN HAY AND GRAIN 
FIRST CLASS TURNOUTS 

Single and Double 
AGENTS FOR STUDEBAKER VEHICLES AND WAGONS 

Coalinga California 



PACIFIC MINIM: & oil. REPORTER. 



29 



dripping in the ash pit, 1 melting down the brisk side walls or rings, 

choking and gumming tfl with an oily sool that hli 

ilphur which terms sulphnrii 
with tl tli' 1 ©A, ud em ealled "hot short," thnl po* 

■ ir trouble, • <i iullv if the air fof combustion is not 

• into ami through tha furnace, combustion 

chamber, tubes, and up the stark, without onee passing through tin- Are, bul 

• lint; what you are really trying to heal and straining the boiler 

by the uneven temperatures at the different points. Swing joints fitted to 

burners sot in tiro .leers, as in the fast Vallejo steamer M Arrow," "General 

ftfonticello," "Iaqna," "San Gabriel, " "Brunswick," 

■ad "James EL Biggins," are highly appreciated by marine men at all timi <. 

The remark is often made: "There is no difference in burners," "tho 

nits ire not in tho oil,'' "wo have perfeel combustion, as om 

shows no smoke," etc, hut lot us reason ami Bee what Admiral Melville 

m his r.port: "Out of some 8,000 humors submitted, 
IN) per i-ont were worthless," qnite a difference, and again in a series of four- 
teen testa under a Bohensteen water tube boiler, tho reports run from in. 77 
to 14.4:; P. a a. 212 degrees. 

In tho I". S. Government tost in tho now Sun Francisco Postoflice under 
a Homo Boiler by the Government exports an evap. or 15.8 P. & A. 812 degrees. 

From a number of tests at the Union Mills with different burners Ui ■• 
reports range from 12.44 to 16.50 P. A A. 212 degrees under a Heine water 

tube holler. 

At the Am. riean Steel ami Wire Works in a seven days' test the burners 

ranged from 14*50 to 17.:'.". P. & A. -l- degreea under a tubular boiler. 

The Ann riean Beet Sugar Company report tests under a water tube boiler 
of from 14 to 17 P. ft A. 812 degrees. At the Western Sugar Refining Company 
in over 25 burners tested the reports run from 6% to 14.20 P. & A. 212 
degrees. Under an English gunboat type of Scotch marine boiler, all burners 
tested under the same conditions were burners of the injector, ejector, siphon, 
blow-pipe, steam jet ami Automatic Oil Gas types, flat flame, round flame, 
inside and outside mixers and nil gas mixers, showing conclusively that, there 
is a difference in burners, just as there is in men, in sunshine and rain, in day 
and night, and in diamonds and paste. 

MINERAL OUTPUT OF CALIFORNIA FOR 1905 AND 18 PRECEDING 

YEARS. 

The following table shows the output of minerals from the State of 
California for nineteen years ended 1905 as compiled by Louis E. Aubury, State 
Mineralogist: 

1905 Total for 19 years 

PRODUCTS. Quantity Value Quantity Value 

Antimony tons ' 680 $79,805 

Asbestos tons 112 $2,625 704 30,587 

Asphalt tons 40,304 285,290 362,265 4,732,167 

Bismuth tons 20 2,400 

Bituminous Rock tons 24,753 60,436 689,005 2,376,806 



Borax lbs. 

' lemenl hi. is. 

Chrome tons 

iprasi lbs. 

1 lav Briek M . 

t la\ —Pottery tons 

< 'on! ton- 

< topper Iba. 

Fuller's Earth tons 

Gold. 

Granite cu. ft. 

Graphite tons 

Gypsum 

Infusorial Earth , . . .tons 
I ron Ore tons 

l.i ad tona 

Lime and Limestone. 

Lithia Mica tons 

Macadam tons 

Magnesite tons 

Manganese tons 

Marble CU. ft. 

Mica tons 

M inernl Paint tons 

Mineral Water gals. 

Natural Gas . ...M. cu. ft. 
Onyx and Travertine. 

Paving Blocks M. 

Petroleum bbls. 

Platinum ozs. 

Pyrites tons 

Quartz Crystals . .....lbs. 

Quicksilver flasks 

Rubble tons 

Salt tons 

Sand — Glass tons 

Sand — Quartz tons 

SandstODe cu. ft. 

Serpentine cu. ft. 

Silver. 

Slate squares 

Soapstone tons 

Soda tons 

Sulphur tons 

Tin lbs. 

Tungsten tons 

Tourmaline and other gems 

Totals. 



92,61 
1,26 

10 



1,019,158 
1,791,916 






UsO.OIs 

183,805 

16,997,489 

1.344 

'J'Js.7.".s 



2.27:i.7so 
130,146 
1 14,500 

38, 

19,197,043 



1 J. Soil 

8,000 



.-,l,.-,iiii 



266 



25 

1,440,455 

3,933 



25,083 

878,647 

276 

942,503 

16,221 



73,803 129,450 



754 

2,194,150 
148,345 



4,025 
538,700 
102,479 



1,244,211 
1,864,630 

.-..201 



106 

450 
7,824 

7,265,694 

33, v 1 1 
8,661 

150 

1.0,204 

22,429,766 



3,408 

34,275,701 

200 

15,503 



134,347 32,793 

9,007,820 128,032,760 

3,320 

63,958 92,002 



24,655 

1,183,802 

77,118 

9,257 



886,081 

774,267 

141,925 

8,121 



302,813 483,268 



Cora'l value 

4,000 

300 

15,000 



678,494 

40,000 

3,000 

22,500 



52 



18,800 
148,500 



550,154 

9,458,467 

1,200,269 

39,968 

1,700 

10,500 

56,860 

1,196 

89,430 

2 

L87,289 

52 



I, no 
1117.140 

572. 1U0 
151,404 

7,790,08 i 
127,550 

5,548,016 
295,475 

77,711 

1,029,910 

9,300 

111,298 

6,041. .sii4 

1,238,596 

'.11,1011 

!)S7,702 

51,706,897 

25,190 

379,438 

:17,46S 

28,503,131 

7,194,647 

2,972,042 

59,897 

2,200 

3,352,645 

28,565 

15,217,341 

397,739 

33,971 

1,214,000 

50 

59,964 

18,800 

016.600 



$43,069,227 $505,699,408 




anhattan, Nevada 

The World's Wonder Gold Camp 



The Manhattan Nevada Gold Mines Co. owns and operates extensive and valuable 
properties that seem destined to make Manhattan's greatest mines. 

A limited amount of treasury stock in this company is now offered at 

THIRTY CENTS PER SHARE 

Every share of stock is fully protected by our $3,000,000 Trust or Guaranty Fund. 

Under the same management as the Murchie Gold Mines Con., the Empire 
Gold Mines Ltd., the California and New York Oil Co., the California Monarch 
Oil Co., and other famous dividend payers. 

As an absolutely safe and wonderfully profitable investment this stock is unrivaled. 
Write at once for illustrated prospectus and six month's free subscription to the Invest- 
ment Herald. 



A. L. WISNER & CO 

Bankers Fiscal Agents 

80 Wall Street, New York 



30 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER. 



GOLDFIELD SOMEESET MINING COMPANY. 

This property consists of eighteen claims known as the Somerset and 
Huntch Bell No. 18, lying between the Commonwealth and Knickerbocker 
properties and adjoining the Monarch. It lies east of Goldfield and is tra- 
versed by several strong veins which have been exposed by surface trenching 
and by a shallow tunnel. The ledge is from twelve to fifteen feet in width 
and carries good values in gold with an occasional kidney of high value. 

Homer Wilson, a mining man of much experience — the owner of the 
Chloride Baily in Trinity County, Cal., and who is interested in the Keane 
Wonder, the Funeral Eange, and in the Centennial mine at Lida — is to have 
charge of the development of the Goldfield Somerset. A new tunnel, which 
will give a depth of about 150 feet, will be commenced at once. 

Associated with Mr. Wilson in the Goldfield Somerset, is C. F. Humphrey 
and Jno. J. Meyers of San Francisco, who have of late become extensively 
interested in the mines of Nevada. 

FAIEVIEW AZTEC. 

One of the latest Nevada mining stocks to be listed on the San Francisco 
Stock and Exchange Board is Fairview Aztec, Fairview District. The incor- 
poration is a million shares, par value one dollar, full-paid and non-assessable, 
400,000 shares in the treasury and 600,000 shares pooled. Officers of the 
company are W. H. Wells, president; H. B. Lind, vice-president; F. H. La- 
throp, secretary; John S. Cook, treasurer, and G. L. Kaeding, J. B. Davis and 
W. H. Webber, directors. 

President Wells is a prominent Philadelphia capitalist. Vice-president 
Lind is an eminent lawyer of Goldfield. Secretary Lathrop is a banker and 
former secretary of the Goldfield Mining Exchange. Treasurer Cook is presi- 
dent of the John S. Cook & Co., bank of Goldfield, the richest institution in 
Nevada. Director Kaeding is a mining engineer, who has charge of the affairs 
of a prominent London syndicate. Director Davis made mines from prospects 
of the Sandstorm and Great Bend in Goldfield and the Gold Bar in Bullfrog 
district. Director and General Manager Webber is also manager of the Ne- 
vada Hills mine in Fairview district, which he made a dividend, payer in the 
first eight months of its life, 

The Fairview Aztec group comprises five claims which endline the estate 
of Fairview Eagle. The Eagle is working in high-grade ore and will become a 
regular shipper in the early part of 1907. Eagle stock was offered on the 
market at 60 cents last June and within four months went to &1.40. Aztec has 
the east extension of the Eagle ledge. Eagle is joined on the south by the 
Nevada Hills. 

Messrs. W. F. Bond and Company the oldest established brokerage house 
in Goldfield, are fiscal agents for the Aztec and at 35 cents per share floated 
sufficient stock to carry forward developments to the point of a proved 
mine before they listed it on the exchange of San Francisco. Aztec is equip- 
ped with a power hoist, the second in Fairview district, Fairview Eagle having 
received the first. Already the shaft is sinking in fine ore and all doubts 
of the mine's being a coming shipper are dispelled. The shares are enjoying 
a lively trade around 35 cents. Fairview is one of the youngest districts in 
Nevada, dating its era of activity from the first week of March of 1906. 
GOLDFIELD SKYLAEK. 

Messrs. Bond and Company are also fiscal agents for the Goldfield Skylark, 
an estate fifty acres adjoining the Yellow Eose, Eureka and Diamondfield 
townsite in the Diamondfield section of Goldfield district. It is another 
million dollar corporation and is offering a limited apportionment of its stock 
at 15 cents per share. In the near future Skylark will be listed in Goldfield 
and San Francisco. Officers are President T. L. Oddie., Vice-President Dia- 
mondfield Jack Davis, Secretary Willis M. Sears, Treasurer John S. Cook and 
Directors Oddie, Davis, Sears, Hugh Brown and Fred Duller. 

Senator Oddie is one of the most widely known mining operators in 
America. Diamondfield Jack Davis is the father of Diamondfield, where he has 
made a fortune in the development of some of the greatest Goldfield mines. 
He and Senator Oddie own the control of the Skylark. Mr. Sears is a practi- 
cal mining man and expert accountant. Mr. Brown is a lawyer of note and 
Mr. Dulfer is a broker who has made a marked success of mining. 

Near the Skylark are such bonanzas as the Black Buttes, the Great Bend, 
Vernal, Daisy and Triangle. On the surface of the Skylark there show three 
well defined ledges which yield fair gold values at the grassroots and look 
better as depth is attained. A shaft is sinking and a hoist is ordered. 

Messrs. Bond & Co. are placing Skylark stock now at 15 cents and will 
list it in the near future. 



A BUSY BROKERAGE FIRM 

Among the leading mining brokerage offices . of San Francisco there are 
few, if any, that present as lively a scene' as the headquarters of W. C. Cox 
& Co., Inc., in the Monadnock Building. A representative of the Pacific 
Mining & Oil Reporter called on them a few days ago, and was shown through 
their establishment. They employ a large force of stenographers, bookkeepers, 
and clerks, and their offices are equipped with every modern device Jor 
handling their tremendous business. During the short period the company 
has been actively engaged in San Francisco it has made itself known in 
all parts of the country and its books show a long list of clients. 

W. C. Cox who was instrumental in establishing the firm of PatricK, 
Elliott & Camp of Goldfield, is president of the company, and George K. 
Ford, the well known attorney, formerly of the United Eailroads of this 
city, is secretary and treasurer. Both gentlemen have lived in the different 
mining camps of Nevada, and are thoroughly conversant with the mini.ag 
industry of the sagebrush state. 

The company has on its payroll a staff of engineers and correspondents 
in all the leading mining camps of Nevada, and its facilities for giving 
clients prompt and efficient service are the best. A weekly market letter 
is published by the firm and the data contained therein is not only wed 
written and well gotten up, but clearly demonstrates it is based upon -u\ 
intimate knowledge of the conditions in Nevada and the properties that 
are mentioned in the letter. 

The presence of W. C. Cox & Co., Inc., in San Francisco not only bespeaks 
the good judgment of the heads of the firm in selecting this city as their 
headquarters, but will materially promote the mining brokerage business 
locally and arouse even greater interest than is at prese t taken in Nevada 
mnes. and raining. 



SMITH, EMERY & CO. 

Chemists and Chemical Engineers 




AlfALTSIS, TESTS, INSPECTIONS 

Petroleum, I^efosene, 
Asphalt, JVIineflals, petals, 
Cement, CUater/, Earths, 
Stone, Gases Salts, Clay 

lank Cars and Oil Skips 

sampled and inspected 




1068 BROADWAY 



at 12th 

California 



OIL STOCK EXCHANGE 

Oscar Eldridge, Proprietor 

Arroyo Grande, California 

Oil Stocks bought and sold on Commission. Before 
investing call or write for quotations. 



MAILED FREE ON REQUEST 

An elaborately illustrated and ably edited resume of the past 
year's developments in the mines and town of Goldfield,. to be pub- 
lished under the auspices of the Goldfield Mining Stock Exchange, 
will be sent to any address in the world free of cost. If interested 
in Nevada mines or stocks send us your address. We are members 
of the mining stock exchanges of Goldfield, Reno and San Francisco 
and are the oldest established brokerage house in Goldfield. 

W. F. BOND & CO. 

Goldfield, Nevada 



PRIVATE ROOriS 



JULES WITTMAN 



Jules' Restaurant 

Only First-Class Restaurant in Burned District 
Formerly 315-323 Pine Street 

Regular Dinner, with Wine, 75 cts. 
Sundays and Holidays, $1 00 

OPEN EVENINGS 

326 BUSH STREET, Bet. Montgomery and Kearny. San Francisco 



WM. E. L. MEYER 



CHAS. MARTIN 



JVIEVEH & CO. 

Inspectors of Petroleum and Its Products 
Gangers, LUeigher/s and Tank (Measurers 

Licensed by New York Produce Exchange 

K No. 1 PRODUCE EXCHANGE ANNEX, NEW YORK 
968 BROADWAY, OAKLAND, CAE. 

POINT BREEZE, PENNA. PORT ARTHUR, TEXAS 

CABLE ADDRESS : OCREYEM, N. Y. 

Represented by O. B*. BRADY 



PACIFK MINING & OIL REPORTER. 



31 



CALIFORNIA STOCK & OIL EXCHANGE. 

oil companiea 
on tl nhanee: 

Bid. 



■ ..•k. Tr. i.r $49.00 

■u B 



. I)s 

Forty .50 

Four ! .25 

Bome 

rial 

tadependi i ■ ■ 

Junction .10 

i 

Kern | new) . . • • .10 

Kern River 

Linda Vista .10 

M.Kittriek .05 

eh of Arizona .IS 

Nevada County .20 

Oil City Pel . 54 

Oyama 

Peerless ."..'_'."> 

Piedmont .10 

Pittsburg 

Sterling 

Superior .06 

Twenty-Eight 

Wabash .35 

West Shore . 2 . 00 

Wolverine . 10 



.in 



15.00 
.15 



LO.OO 



.15 



.05 

1.45 



7.50 



.50 



the San 



Asked 



SAN FEANCISCO STOCK EXCHANGE. 
Following are the latest quotations of mining stocks listed on 
Francisco Stock & Exchange Board: 

Alaska. 
Bid. Asked. Bid. 

Wil.l Goose $1.75 

Nevada 
Bid. Asked. Bid. Asked. 

Belmont 5.50 6.00 Midway Exten 33 .35 

Belmont Ex 19 Mizpah Exten r. .40 

Boston Tonop 17 .IS Montana 3.92 

Brougher's J. B 25 .. Mont. Mid. Ex 18 .20 

California 22 .. Mont. Pitts. Ex 16 .17 



City Abstract Company, Inc. 



Searchers of Records 

ISSUE 

Unlimited Certificates of Title, 

o R 
Abstracts of Title, 

o R 
Chains of Title for purpose of Quieting 
Title under the McEnerney Act. 



Phone Market 978 

67 CITY HALL AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 



Stocks nnd ft Telephone WEST 6155 

High-grmli" Securities 
MifMH and Mining 



Codes — Wottei 

— Private* 
CaliK — "Borlini" 



Alfred A. Borlini & Co., Inc. 

Capital, $100,000 

OUR SPECIALTIES 

high-class Investments In Tonopah, Goldfield, 
Bullfrog, Manhattan, and Adjacent Districts 

We handle None But the Best 

OUR AIM 

PROFITS FOR CLIENTS 

NOW OFFERING 

Shares in the Bullfrog Fortuna Mining Company at 
25 cents per share. 

Allotment being rapidly subscribed. 

Write at once for our Booklet "Money Talks." DO NOT 
DELAY. THIS MEANS Y00. 

A. A. BORLINI & CO., Inc. 

Suite 33 Saint Mungo Building, I300 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco 



Cash Boy 12 .14 

Esperanza 02 

Eureka Tonop .10 

Golden Anch 43 .44 

Golden Crown 19 .20 

Golden Gate 10 

Gold Mtn OS 

Gold M. Con 01 .03 

Great "Western 05 .06 

Home .17 

Indiana Tonop 02 .03 

Jim Butler 1.27 1.30 

Jim Butler Ex 06 .07. 

Little Tonop 2.50 

McNamara .60 . 

Midway 2.32 2.35 

Goldfield 

Bid. Asked. 

Adams 19 .20 

Aloha 09 

Atlanta 63 .64 

Band 50 

Black Ants 08 .09 

Black Butte Bon 10 .11 

Black Butte Ex 11 .12 

Black Rock 09 .10 

Blue Bell 19 .20 

Blue Bull 38 .39 

Brooklyn 05 .06 

Butte Goldfield 12 .14 

Booth 87 

C. O. D 1.05 

Columbia 90 

Columbia Mt 1.00 1.05 

Columbia Mt. Ex 09 .10 

Comb. Fraction 3.40 

Commonwealth 26 .28 

Conqueror 20 .21 

Cracker Jack 15 .16 

Daisy 2.25 

Daisy Annex 25 

Daisy Exten 10 .11 

D. B. But. Con 45 .46 

Dixie 12 .13 

Empire 10 

Esmeralda 26 .27 

Exploitation 26 

Federal .14 

Florence 3.47 3.50 



N. Y. Tonop. Con 22 

North Star 40 

Ohio Tonop 14 .15 

Ohio Tonop. Ex 12 

Paymaster 03 .04 

Reel Rock Ex 03 .04 

Rescue Con 21 .22 

Tonop. Ex 5.87 

Tonop. Home C 01 .03 

Tonop. Lode 15 

Tonop. S. and G 03 

Tonop. Nev 16.00 19.25 

West End 1.60 1.97 

West Tonop 25 

W. Tonop. Ex 15 

District. 

Bid. Asked. 

Grandma 20 

Great Bend 88 .90 

Great Bend Annex 17 .20 

Great Bend Exten 25 .27 

Hiliernia 18 

Highland 05 

Jumbo 3.50 

Jumbo Exten 1.22 1.25 

Kendall 58 

Kendall Exten 07 .08 

Kewana Exten 24 .27 

Laguna 1.50 

Lone Star 26 .27 

Lou Dillon 29 .30 

Lucky Boys 22 

Mayne ..' 16 .17 

May Queen 22 

May Queen Exten 15 

Midnight Paw 11 

Milltown M. Co 42 .44 

Mohawk 13.50 

Mohawk .Tr 06 .07 

Mohawk Exten 24 .25 

Moose Goldfield 11 

Nevada Boy 18 .19 

Nevafla Goldfield 40 .41 

Nev. Western 07 

Oro 46 .48 

Palace Goldfield 16 

Panyan 11 .12 

Pennsylvania 05 



32 



PACIFIC MININC & OIL REPOETBR. 



Florence Exten 

Frances-Mkk 

Frisco 

G. B. of Goldfield 

Gold Dust 

Goldfield Belmont . . 

Goldfield Bull Dog 

Goldfield Cpr. Mines 7. 

Goldfield Fissure 

Goldfield G. B. Ex 

Goldfield Herald 

Goldfield M. Kev 1. 

Goldfield Meda 

Goldfield N. Star 

Goldfield Portland 

Gold Flat 

Goldfield L. Strike 

Goldfield Kewanos I. 

Goldfield Band 

Goldfield T. Chance 

Goldfield Union 



1.00 

1.05 
.07 
.50 
.06 

7.25 

.28 
.11 
1.37 
.11 
.20 



.20 
21 



Bullfrog 

Bid. Asked. 



Potlach 40 

Bed Hills 

Bed Lion 15 

Bed Top 

Bed Top Exten 29 

Sandstorm 69 

Sandstorm Exten 11 

Silver Pick 1.30 

Silver Pick Exten 15 

Simmerone 35 

Spearhead Gold 42 

Spearhead Frac 

St. Ives 80 

Sun Dog . .08 

Sunnyside 

Treasure 

Verde 03 

Vernal 18 

Wonder 06 

Yellow Eose 05 

Yellow Tiger 11 

District. 



.32 
.16 

3.50 
.30 
.70 
.12 

1.32 



Bid. 



Alliance . 15 

Amargosa 07 

Amethyst 61 

Baltimore 04 

Big B. F 05 

Black Spar 

Bonne Clare 29 

Annex 05 

Banner 

Combination .09 

Consolidation 03 

Daisy 

B. F. Exten 15 

Gold King 40 

Midas 

B. F. of Nev 39 

Nat. Bank 55 

North Star 14 

Sunset 18 

Victor 

China-Nev 

Croesus 21 

Den. B. F. An 28 

Denver E. Ex 12 

Diamond B. F 10 

Gold Bar 1.32 

Gold Bar Annex 

Gold Bar Exten 

Gold Bar S. Exten 

Goldfield B. K 

Golden Scepter 

G. M. Goldfield 09 

Happy Hooligan 12 

Homestake C 1.20 



.08 
.62 
.06 
.06 
.15 
.30 

1.10 
.10 

.52 
.16 

.80 
.40 
.57 

.19 
.32 
15 

.29 



1.35 
.40 
.12 
.15 
.07 
.59 
.11 
.13 



Homestake Ex 

Lige Harris 

Little B. F 

Mayflower Ann 

Mayflower Consol 

Maryland 

Midnight 

Montana B. F 

Mont. H. Mines 

Montg Mtn 

Mont-Sh. Ex 

Nugget 

N. Shoshone 

Ohio B. F 

Orig. B. F 

Orig. G. Bar Ex 

Penn. B. F 

Piute 

Ehyolite Tn 

San Francisco 

Shoshone 

Sho.-B. F. G 

Sho. at Bank 

Skookum B. F 

Steinway 

Tramp Con 1. 

Trinidad 

Valley View 

Velvet 

Ventura 

Wolverine 

Yankee Boy 

Yankee Girl 



65 



IS 



.50 
.81 

.16 

.18 

.19 
.07 
.10 
.12 

Asked. 
.21 
.06 
.05 
.22 
.66 
.03 
.20 
.16 
.14 
.44 
.23 
.14 
.18 
.25 
.21 
.14 
.11 
.16 



15 



.08 
.09 
.12 
.21 
.34 
1.75 
.56 
.25 
.11 

.08 

.15 



Manhattan 
Bid. Asked. 
05 



District. 



Bid. 



April Fool Ex 04 

Atlantic & P 06 .07 

Bull Dog 03 

Comet 03 

Gold Wedge 18 .20 

Granny .32 

Indian Camp 1.05 

Jumping Jack 41 .48 

Little' Grey 50 

Atlas 15 

Belmont 04 .05 

Belle OS .12. 

Big Four 09 

Broncho 19 .20 

Buffalo 09 .10 

Carson ' .14 

Central 03 .04 

Man. Con 1.00 1.05 

Man. Con. Ex 20 

Combination .14 

Crescent '. . . . .15 

Cow Boy 11 .12 

Diamond .08 

Dexter 76 .77 

Frisco 26 .28 

Golden Gate 20 



Gold Nugget 

Humboldt 07 

Little Joe 05 

Jumbo 04 

Man. of Nev 18 

Mammoth 

Mohawk 

Monday Ex 04 

Oriental 15 

Eed Top 06 

Euss 

Standard 05 

Verde 04 

Wolftone 35 

Mineral Hill 

Mustang Man 17 

Nemo 20 

Original Man 15 

Pine Nut 32 

Eocky Hill 16 

Seyler Hum 14 

Stray Dog 

Taquima Cop 

Thanksgiving 

Whale 10 

Yellow Horse 10 



Asked. 
.08 

.08 



.19 
.21 
.15 

.10 
.17 



Other Districts. 



Bid. Asked. 



Bid. 



Alice of Won 21 .22 

Bullion Hill 1.20 

Cen. Goldfield 65 

Congress 13 .14 

Cyrus Noble 17 .20 

Clifford M. Co 04 

Dimfld. Trian 39 .40 

Eagles Nest 20 .25 

Fairy S. King 50 

Fair Eagle 99 1.00 



Johnnie Cons 

Kaw G. M. Co 

Kaw M. Co. N 

Lee Bonanza 

Lida Bell 

Nevada Hills 3 

Nev. Sunshine 

Nev. T. Gold 

N. St. of Won 

Palmetto 



17 



.10 

.00 



.07 
.20 



.33 



.70 
.10 
.10 
.11 
.11 

Asked. 
.18 
.01 
.01 
.20 



30 



.20 
.39 
.31 
.34 



King Keystone Oil Co. 

Lubricating Oils and Greases 

Marine Engine Oils, Boiler Compound, Distillates 

Linseed Oil, Paraffine Wax, Vegetable Oil 

Asphaltum, Animal Oil, Fish Oil 



22 Clay Street 



San Francisco, Cal. 



SEATTLE BRANCH: 
Cor. Pike St. and R. R. Ave. 

REFINERY: West Berkeley, Cal. 



Wm. Wallace 



B. W. Charlesworth 



WALLACE & CHARLESWORTH 




PLUMBERS, TINNERS and 

Galvanized Tank Builders 

Everything in Plumbing, Tin and 
Sheet Iron Work 

Estimate furnished on all kinds 

of work 

Oil Tanks, Bath Tubs, Sinks, 

Wagon Tanks, Toilets, Pumps, 

Water Barrels, Lavatories, 

Wind Mills 



P&B 

Coalinga, Cal. 



Agent of 
ROOFING PAINTS 



B & R PAPERS for Sheathing Dwelling 

Are Unequalled. 

Write for samples and prices. 

BONESTELL, RICHARDSON & CO. 

California's Leading Paper House 
473 to 4 8 5 SIXTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

WRITI NG IN SIGHT 

Just Purchased New 

L. C. SMITH & BROS. 

TYPEWRITERS 

Nathan-Dohrman Co. . 6 machines Union Trust Bank . . 5 machines 

Cal. Safe DepositBank . 5 " Cal. Wine Ass'n 6 

Also City and County Bank, & Nevada Bank 
Catalogue Free 

L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

1820 Fillmore Street 

Telephone "West 6288 

Branches:— Los Angeles, Portland, Seattle, Spokane, 

Tacoma. 




PACIFIC MINING & oil. REPORTER. 



33 



Fairvi.-w R.l. Mt 
[da Mini - 












- 


.IS 


.17 




.L'" 



.la.k Pol . 1.47 Sil. I'k. Con. 



Pittsburg s. I'k 1.7:: 

Bamaey 

Round Ml 

Bound Mt. F.x 'J 4 

Rub; Wonder 32 

Searchlight Treat 



1.75 

1.00 
M 

.34 

A< 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

i.-.i Oil Company hu enjoyed ■ most remarkable year's pro 
notwithstanding the fael thai general conditions have not l " altogether 

rable. Strong competition, lew prices, and several failures in wild-col 
territory have bao to be contended with, but, in the faea <»t" these obstacles, 
the net earnings ol the corporation for the year 1906 has been no less thun 
- not inclnd i allowed for depreciation of its 

wells ami equipment. This would be aboul five per cent of its issued capital' 
ization. It is believed that a cart of this amount will shortly be paid out in 
dividends. 

The Associated bas constantly added to its land holdings by the purehnsc 
reral additional valuable proven tracts of land. It has also fortified itself 
by several immense quantity contracts running over a period of several years, 
the greatest ol which is the recently consummated contract with the Independ- 
ent Agency of Bakersfield, which calls for approximately 3,500,000 barrels 
of oil. 

The Associated is not. at the present time, an aggressive developer of its 
holdings. Although it has thousands of acres of land that is known to be pro- 
ductive, it chosea to purchase a greal quantity of oil in the open market, and 
by contract, sufficient to provide for its requirements above its own large 
production. In the meantime it is keeping its own territory as a reserve for 
future requirements. 

The management of the Associated has the utmost faith in the future of 
the state's oil industry. When shown a copy of our article "California's Re- 
serve Supply.*' appearing in this issue, Mr. W. S. Porter, Vice-President and 
(ieueral Manager of the company said: that our figures were no surprise to 
him, inasmuch as the geologists of that company have long ago arrived at a 
similar conclusion. He said that his company owned practically sixty per 
rent of the Kern Kiver field and that he had reason to believe that the field 
would be a big producer fifty years from this time. "That does not mean,'' 
said he, "that there will be an overproduction of oil. If producer and marketer 
will stand together in the curtailment of production, all can enjoy a better 
price for commodity. With the recent contracts for delivery of large quan- 
tities of oil to Japanese industries I am inclined to believe there is no over- 
production in the state, but there certainly is sufficiently oil in the proven 
oil districts to fill any probable demand for an indefinite period of time."' 

Besides the large holdings of the company in Kern River, the Associated 
owns and holds 2,970 acres of proven land in the Coalinga field where it has 
a considerable production. It also owns by lease and purchase a large acreage 
in the Arroyo Grande and Santa Maria fields. In addition to this the Asso- 
ciated owns over ninety per cent of the stock of the Amalgamated Oil Com- 
pany operating in the Salt Lake or Amalgamated field near Los Angeles, 
which, at the present time, has a daily production of about 6,000 barrels. 

When asked about the alleged affiliation of the Standard and Associated 
companies Mr. Porter said that he was willing to go on record as stating 
that there was no affiliation, agreement or understanding between the two 
companies; that he would go still further and say that neither the Standard 
Oil Company or any stockholder in the Standard Oil Company owned a share 
of Associated stock to the best of his knowledge and belief. Mr. Porter 
also stated that so far as he knew no Associated stockholder is a stockholder 
in the Standard Oil Company. 



EASTERN EXPORTS 

Following are the exports of mineral oils from the Eastern ports of 
United States for the month of November, 1906: 

Crude — 

Baltimore 

Boston and Charlestown 

Delaware 

New York 

Philadelphia 

Galveston 



Total 

Naphthas — 

Baltimore 

Boston and Charlestown . 

Delaware 

New York 

Philadelphia 

Galveston 



Total 

Illuminating — 

Baltimore 

Boston and Charlestown 

Delaware 

New York 

Philadelphia 

Galveston 



Total 

Lubricating and paraffin- 
Baltimore 

Boston and Charlestown . . . 

Delaware 

New York 



Philadelphia 3,552,729 



Quantities. 
Gallons. 


Values. 
Dollar.5. 


6,033 

9,627,299 

1,040 


301 

547,796 

60 


9,634,372 


548,217 


2,100 


460 


406,451 
93,850 


58,202 
11,631 


502,401 


70,293 


70,799 


8,642 


48,458,525 

22,986,061 

2,403,261 


3,079,538 
1,205,623 

147,200 


73,918,646 


4,441,00" 


586,092 
22,353 


70,919 
4,461 


8,361,299 
3,552,729 


1,032,980 

388,781 



■2%. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE 



Renters Loan and Trust Company 



Till LOAN \M' rm T 8T COMPANY of 8an 

Francisco, ' merctal and Savings bank, iftfe 

Tsults, IIS Hayes street, between Van Ness avenue and Polk 
street.— For the half year ending December 16th :i dividend 
has been declared ;ii the rate oi four ( H per cent pi r annum 
on savings deposits, free >>i taxes, payable on and after 
MONDAY, December 17,1900. Dividends nol called for are 
added i<< and bear the same rate <>f Interest »* the principal 
i I'M,, December r>. 1906, Also two [-1 per eent per annum 
paid on commercial deposits, subject to check, credited 
monthly. i s. scott. cashier. 

i lated, Sa ii E ranclsco, December I, 1906. 



•A-% 



HAVE YOU SEEN OUR 

NEW MAP 

OF 

Santa Maria and Arroyo Grande 
Oil Fields? 

It is the only reliable map of these districts ever pub- 
lished. Shows the Ocean Front from Gaviota to Port 
Harford, Refinery Sites, Piers, Pipe Lines, Location 
of Wells, Etc., Etc. ::::::: 

Printed on Cloth, Size 44x80 inches, Roller-mounted 

Sent to any address, prepaid, upon receipt of $10.00 

PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



1300 Golden Gate Ave. 



San Francisco, U. S. A. 



Cable Address " ROMANIC LONDON • 



LANE & MACANDREW 

26 Great St. Helens, 
London, England 

Oil Merchants and Brokers 

SPECIALLY REQUIRED 

LARGE SUPPLIES of BENZINE for all the Countries of Europe 
Brokers for Building, Purchasing, Selling and Chartering 

OIL TANK STEAMERS 



Managers of the Following Tank Steamers: 

"LE COQ" [4,600 tons], "ORIFLAMME" [5,000 tons], "LUCILINE" 

[5,000 tons], "LUX" [2,800 tons], "TEREK" [5,200 tons], 

"BALAKANI" [5,200 tons], " CAUCASIAN" [6,600 tons], 

"EUPLECTELA" [5,000 tons], "ROCKLIGHT," [4,100 

tons], "TURBO" [5,100 tons], "PINNA" [7,800 tons] 



34 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL EBPORTER. 



Galveston 



9,000 



1,260 



Total 

Residuum — 

Baltimore 

Boston and Cbarlestown 

Delaware 

New York 

Philadelphia 

Graiveston 



12,531,473 1,498,401 



530,000 
5,333,023 



Total 

Total mineral oils — 

Baltimore 

Boston and Charlestown 

Delaware 

New York 

Philadelphia 

Galveston 



Total 



. 5,863,023 

586,092 
95,252 

. 57,762,308 
. 41,592,962 
. 2,413,301 

.102,449,915 



THE OIL MARKET 
American Position. 



Following are the latest quotations 
Francisco: 

cts. 
Water "White Coal Oil, in bulk 10—11 



(wholesale) for mineral oils at San 



Special Coal Oil 

Pear Oil, in eases . ... 

Astral 

Star 

Extra Star ' 

Elaine 

Eocene 

Stove Gasoline, in bulk . 
Stove Gasoline, in eases. . 
Motor Gasoline, in bulk 



12% 

17 

17 

17 

20 

26 

19 

17% 

24 

17% 



Motor Gasoline, in cases . . 
No. 1 Engine Distillate, 

iron barrels or drums 
No. 2 Engine Distillate, 
iron barrels or drums .... 
Cases, 6% more. 

Benzine, in bulk 

i Benzine, in cases 

J 86-degree Gasoline, in bulk. 
| 86-degree Gasoline, in cases. 



cts. • 
24 

08 

06% 

121/2 

19 
30 
36 



Russian Position. 



During the past fortnight the quotations on the Baku market have fluc- 
tuated considerably backwards and forwards, and the quotation for Crude 
Petroleum for prompt delivery, after falling to 22% copecks per pood, has 
gradually advanced until today it has reached 23% copecks per pood. 

For forward delivery the price, after falling to 23 copecks, has again 
advanced to 23% copecks per pood. The price for Residuals has advanced 
gradually to 24% copecks per pood for prompt delivery. 

The quotation for Kerosene, after falling to 26% copecks per pood, ad- 
vanced to 27% copecks, and now stands at 27 copecks for prompt delivery 
free on rail Baku. For delivery f. o. b. vessel on the Caspian Sea the quota- 
tion, after falling to 26 copecks per pood, has again advanced and now stands 
at 27 copecks per pood. 

The position at Baku is on the whole satisfactory, although there 
have been strikes at one or two of the Armenian owned factories, but it is 
hoped that the strike will not spread. 

English Position. 

During the past fortnight there has been very little change in the quota- 
tions for American and Russian lamp oils on the London and Liverpool mar- 
kets. Russian oil in the London market fell l-8d. per gallon, and is now 
quoted at 5 3-8d. per gallon. The deliveries have been rather better during 
the past fortnight, and the market remained firm. 

The quotations were as follows: 
London 

Russian oil 5 3-8d. ex wharf in barrels. 

American oil 6d: @ 6 l-2d. ex wharf in barrels. 
Liverpool 

Russian oil 5 3-4d. @ 6d. ex wharf in barrels. 

American oil 6d. @ 6 l-2d. ex wharf in barrels. 

Indian Position. 

During the past fortnight there have been slight fluctuations in the quota- 
tions for several of the lamp oils sold on the Indian markets. The quotation 
for Russian case oil on the Bombay market has fallen 2 annas to rupees 4. 2. 0. 
and for Borneo and Burmah oil the quotation has dropped 1-2 anna. 

In the Karachi market American case oil has advanced 2 annas to rupees 
4. 0. 0., but otherwise the prices are unaltered. 

In the Calcutta market the quotation for Burmah oil fell 1-2 anna but 
that for Sumatra and American lamp oil advanced 1 anna to rupees 3. 3. 0. 

There has been a^considerable falling off in the volume of business during 
the fortnight, but the market is firm. 

The quotations were as follows: 
Bombay — ■ Rupees 

American case oil 4. 

Russian case oil 4. 

' ' Elephant ' ' oil in tins 3. 

Sumatra ' ' Rising Sun ' ' in tins 3. 

Borneo oil in bulk 2. 

Burmah oil in bulk 2.' 

Karachi — ■ 

American case oil 4. 

Burmah oil in tins 3. 

Borneo oil in tins 2. 

Sumatra oil in bulk 2. 

American oil in bulk 2. 



8. 


0. 


2. 


0. 


10. 


0. 


10. 


.0 


8. 


0. 


8. 


0. 


0. 


0. 


3. 


0. 


14. 


0. 


14. 


0. 


14. 


0. 



Calcutta — 

American' case oil 4. 

Eussian case oil . 4. 

Burmaa oil in bulk 2. 

Borneo oil in bulk 2. 

Sumatra oil in bulk 3. 

American oil in bulk 3. 



6. 


G. 


4. 


0. 


13. 


0. 


13. 


0. 


3. 


0. 


3. 


0. 




Steel Oil Tanks 

Refineries Erected Complete 

If you want 

Promptness 
Economy 
Durability 

and 

Honest 
Workmanship 

WRITE US 



Established 1872 



Oil Tank erected for O. R. & N. in Oregon 



Win. Graver Tank Works 

East Chicago, Ind. 



Contract 

Drilling deep 
wells for 
Oil or 
Water 
Furnish Com- 
plete Plants 
for Drilling 
Prices Reas- 
onable 




Box 237 



W. E. YOULE 



Wanted 

food Second- 
hand Rigs 
Oil Well Tools 
Oil Well Cas- 
ing and Pipe 
Engines and 

Boilers 
Fishing Tools 

SAN LUIS 
OBISPO, CAL. 



FRESNO COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY 

Incorporated under the laws of California, January 21, 1901 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 

IMTIvIvY PAID DP 

SEARCHERS OF RECORDS AND 
CONVEYANCE 



Abstracts of Title carefully compiled at reasonable rates 



ISTo. 111C5 K St. 



Fresno, Cal. 



A. P. ffiAY 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

[WHOLESALE AND RETAIL] 

OQost Reliable and Complete Stoek of eamp 

supplies and oil men's furnishings 

in Coalinga 

■^Xrells ^arg-o «Sc Co3^Lpa,ra.3r 
COALINCA. CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



Vol. VIII. No. 5 



San Francisco, Cal., January 20, 1907 



Price, 10 Cents 



SOUTHERN FIELD. 

i- 1906 had much of encouragement for those intere 
in the production of petroleum on the Pacific Coast, and there is do doubt 
but that the year 1907 just ushered in, "ill witness til'' complete restoration 
of the oil business to ii> proper place among the great industries. The cli 
months ear saw a wonderful recovery from i h*- depression which has 

c] in greater or lesser degree for the past five years, and the pew 
efforts which bad been made for two or three years, to secure new markets 
and enlarged facilities for handling the product began to bear fruit, and 
for the first time since the boom "lays of 1900 and 1901, the »r\ of "over- 
production" began to be hushed. It began to dawn on the minds of both tbe 
producer and consumer alike, that production and consumption were about on 
an even plane. Thev began to realize that while inactivity in the field 
hail resulted in s gradual falling off in production, the number of people and 
oinstitutions using liquid fuel had greatly increased; the surplus, which at no 
time in the history of the industry in California has been so large as to 
occasion alarm, had been drawn upon to keep up deliveries or contracts already 
made, and there was actual danger cf a shortage. A resumption of field work 
would be i if sink an eventuality wore to he avoided. 

Now the matter of increasing production in a California oil field is not 
an easy one. The time required to get a well down forestalls any possibility 
of a substantial increase within probably six months, so it may readily be 
seen what is ahead of the oil men of the state. In fact the saving feature 
of the entire business lies in the fact that in several of the fields the wells 
have not been permitted to produce to their full capacity and many others hav ■ 
u entirely shut in, so taken altogether, it appears that till demands will be 

met. [lending tin npletion of new wells. So much for the situation ill 

general. 

The southern fields of the state seem to have profited sooner than those 
in the north by the new conditions. As has been said, the depression which 
followed in the wake of the big boom of 1900 and 1901 was inevitable. Every- 
one at that time were devoting their energies with feverish haste to getting 
oil wells. The drill was kept constantly at work. Large wells were brought 
in. in rapid succession. Tanks and reservoirs were soon overflowing and 
the producers found themselves, figuratively, drowning in their own oil. 
They had failed to look for a market, for their product. In- 

stead of making an intelligent effort towards creating new markets, enlarg- 
ing their facilities for handling and marketing, and cutting down on develop- 
ment work; the producers devoted their time to drilling more wells and — 
damning the Standard Oil Co. This was particularly true in the Kern River 
field, and for four years the Kern River field was held as a club over the 
lead of the producers, especially in the southern part of the state. Los 
Angeles and vicinity furnished a profitable and extensive market for fuel oil, 
but it soon became impossible for local oil men to sell because of Kern River 
product which began to flood this market. Kern River producers boasted 
that they could produce oil and sell it at a profit for twenty cents per barrel, 
and some of the companies then were willing to dispose of their surplus 
product at even a less figure. And soon, by means of special rates 
to favored companies, Kern River oil was competing in the Los Angeles market. 
by underbidding the local producers. This of course, pounded down prices, 
until the industry in the southern fields was well nigh overwhelmed. 

The production gradually declined and little effort was made to keep it 
up. Notwithstanding these facts, a considerable surplus accumulated in the 
southern fields and Kern River oil continued to be sold at ruinous prices. 
This surplus did not really amount to much as probably altogether there was 
not over 250,000 barrels, but it gave a shadow of foundation for howling 
"overproduction," which was done most vociferously. 

Hut the extremely low price of a valuable fuel product did not go un- 
noticed by consumers and not only at home but farther away, consumers sat 
up and took notice. The result was a gradual increase in the demand and 
about six months ago the producers awoke to the fact that there was likely to 
be a shortage of oil. Several immense foreign contracts had been secured, 
calling for millions of barrels. The Kern River producers had organized an 

independent agency ami there was no more oil in Kern River than was i led 

for the contracts from that field and no more Kern River oil was sent to the 
southern markets. Prices gradually began to strengthen. 



The - s alt Lake field west ol Los Lngolea, which at one time threatened 

to keep down the price to the MnrvalH.u point for an indefinite period has not 

materially Increased in i luction during the year. 

Tim improved Conditions have resulted in renewed activity in all the 

southern fichu. Not only are new companies iieing organized, km nil eon 

r. ins are preparing to drill new wells. One healthy feature of the revival in 
the field work is the freedom from wild-catting and stock jobbing. The un- 
scrupulous methods of the early days are absent. The industry is established 
on too substantia! a basis to encourage anything of the kind. All the drilling 
now done is in proven territory ami new Concerns organized, go into the 
business the same as they would in any line of traih — they put in their capi- 
tal and commence business. 

The outlook for the producer was never brighter in the history of the 
business on this Coast. The development work now in progress will not break 
the market. The matter of increasing production will require considerable 
time. The effects of drilling just begun will not be felt within a year. 
Ninety cents has already been paid for oil in the Los Angeles market. With 
Kern River and Coalinga producers organized as they now are there is no 
doubt that a substantial increase over former prices will soon be made, as 
the purchasing agencies are already offering more than they have for two 
or three years past. 

So while the year 1906 was rather ' ' tough sledding * ' for many producing 
aornpanies, it was not so rough as the previous year and its history presages 
the most thriving year of the industry for 1907. 

While, of course, everybody is in business for the profit there is in it, 
and the oil man is no exception to this rule, the fact remains that the oil men 
have during the past few years occupied the position of public philanthropists. 
They have, at no profit to themselves, been the means of developing indus- 
tries, giving employment to thousands and in short of building up the coast as 
nothing else could or would have done. They are, on this year of grace, com- 
- ing into their own. 



Big Gain in Gold Output. 

The Director of the Mint has made a preliminary estimate of the produc- 
tion of gold and silver in the United States during the calendar year, 1906, 
which includes the following: 

Silver. 

Stale. Gold value. Fine ounces. 

Alaska $21,251,100 191,700 

Arizona 3,223,800 2,747,800 

California 18,633,900 1,564,500 

Colorado 22,711,200 12,245,100 

Idaho 1,903,300 8,273,300 

Montana 4,555,800 11,478,700 

Nevada 9,115,800 6,742,900 

New Mexico 225,900 356,200 

Oregon 1,369,900 100,100 

South Dakota 6,822,700 157,500 

Texas 280,100 

Utah 5,172,500 11,538,000 

Washington 352,600 140,500 

Wyoming 269,400 1,300 

Other States 429,100 80,100 

Totals $96,101,400 56,183,500 

Of the more important increases in the production of gold as compared 
with 1905, Alaska stands first with a gain of $6,316,000; Nevada comes next 
with $4,500,000, and Arizona third, with $532,000. Colorado shows a loss in 
gold production of $2,900,000, and California a loss of $563,000. 

In silver production Montana shows a loss of 2,1)00,000 ounces, Colorado a 
loss of 695,000 ounces, and Utah a gain of 2,217,000 onm 

The figures for all the states show a net gain in gold production of $7,920,- 
700, and a net gain in silver production of 82,100 ounces. 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER. 



MEXICAN OIL DEVELOPMENT. 

To the question, Is there oil in Mexico? Consul S. E. Magill writes from 
Tampic-o that the answer ran now be in the affirmative. As to quality and 
quantity, the answer must still be uncertain, authorities and experts differing 
materially. Mr. Magill continues: 

In 1901 attention was called to the explorations of California oil men in 
this vicinity, and in 1902 the statement was made that oil had been discovered 
forty miles west of Tampico. Again in 1904 the subject was treated in a 
dispatch from this consulate. From the history of oil discoveries in the Un- 
ited States it was reasonable to assume that excitement would follow its 
discovery here, with consequent rapid development of oil-bearing territory 
and a determination of its character and extent. Such has not been the case 
by any means. 

The original discoverers sank numerous wells, but before making known 
their discovery they secured for themselves nearly all the salable land for 
miles around, thus effectually preventing others from exploring in the imme- 
diate vicinity. Leasing lands believed to be oil-bearing is a business new to 
Mexico, and is entered upon by local land owners with reluctance. Perhaps 
other reasons, such as the length of time usually required to make land trans- 
fers in Mexico, operated to prevent any such rapid development as would have 
followed the discovery of oil in any part of the United States. Chicago and 
Pittsburg capitalists secured several lots of possible oil land north of Tampico, 
and leased a large tract near the American border in the State of Coahuila, 
which last was explored without satisfactory result. Other explorations have 
followed near the border by other interests, but so far as known without 
success. 

Pennsylvania capitalists secured by lease large 'tracts to the south of 
Tampico along Laguna de Tamiahua, and, surmounting great difficulties in 
getting drilling materials to their land, they explored one section of their 
property to a depth of about 1,200 feet without finding oil. They have moved 
to another section in the same vicinity and are now drilling there. That oil 
exists near the Laguna seems undoubted, as it is often seen on the surface 
thereof, and the frequent asphalt deposits along its shores add further proof. 

Explorations have been carried on for some years by English capitalists 
in the vicinity of Tuxpan, Veracruz, but so far without other results than to 
induce continued explorations in that section by Americans and another English 
company, and in two clashes of interest between rival exploring companies 
the law has been invoked to decide rights whose prospective value is deemed 
great. Eastern American capitalists are exploring near Papantla, Veracruz. 
There are unconfirmed reports of their success. In the extreme southern part 
of the State of Veracruz Pearson & Sons are said to have discovered a grade 
of oil superior to that produced near Tampico, and have made extensive pre- 
parations to store and refine the same, as well as to push further explorations, 
but no reliable reports are at hand as to quantity of oil obtained by them, or 
promise thereof. 

The owners of the original wells at Ebano, near Tampico, went on develop- 
ing their property until they showed a sufficient production to justify the 
Mexican Central Railway Company making a contract for about 1,500 barrels 
per day and to alter a large number of engines from coal to oil burners to 
consume it. This oil is now being delivered and the railway is erecting large 
storage tanks to receive it. 

Shallow wells, giving out a good quality of oil, have been discovered 
around Mexico City, but the flow has been exceedingly limited and explora- 
tions are now being made in that vicinity. In the state of Oaxaca and at 
points on the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, oil has been discovered and of a high 
grade, but the owners of these wells are concealing the quantity, and other 
interests claim that the wells are shallow and of no permanent value. 

Outside of the Tampico district a profitable oil field has not yet been 
developed in Mexico, but it would be unjust to say such may not be at any 
time the ease, for energetic and capable men and companies are exploring 
in Coahuila, near the border, in Tamaulipas, Veracruz, Oaxaca and Jalisco, and 
a strike may be made any day which will open up another paying field and 
give Mexico what it greatly needs, i. e., a fuel and illuminant which it is not 
necessary to import. 



Big Oil Refinery for Vallejo. 



STANDARD OFFICERS RE-ELECTED. 

At a meeting of the shareholders of the Standard Oil Company held in 
Jersey City a few days ago, all of the old directorate of the corporation 
were re-elected, A. O. Bedford being added. This means the re-election of 
all of the old officers when the board meets to reorganize. 



James Clyne, a well known resident of Benicia, has just transferred to a 
Los Angeles oil company twenty-six acres of land on the Carquinez Straits, 
midway between Vallejo and Benicia, upon which will be built an oil refinery 
and a wharf 500 feet long. The new corporation will bring its oil from the 
southern fields. A spur track, three miles long, will connect the site with 
the Southern Pacific at Benicia, which will furnish shipping facilities for 
the plant. Five hundred tons of structural steel has already been ordered 
and building operations will begin at once. Several large steel tanks will be 
set up on the hill above the plant. The decline of the Standard Oil Company 
in the state on account of exposure and bitter sentiment against it makes the 
refining industry at the present time a very alluring occupation and much 
capital is being engaged in it. 



WHERE IS IT? 

The Graphic prints an item in a recent issue in which it states that Santa 
Maria is to be supplied with gas from the "Orcutt" field. For the informa- 
tion of any party who might be led to think otherwise we will say that there 
is no "Orcutt" field in the state and that the town of Santa Maria is to 
be supplied with gas from the Santa Maria field, by a Santa Maria corporation 
financed by Santa Maria capital and that it has not drawn upon "Orcutt" 
in any manner for honors. 



McKITTSICK LOSES OIL BY RAIN STORM. 

During the recent rain storm which swept the state 10,000 barrels of oil 
was washed out of the sump holes at McKittrick, and lost. The sum]) holes 
are mostly built in natural gallics and the rain water flowing down is caught 
by them. As the oil rises to the top it flows over the banks and is wasted 
leaving nothing but water in the sumps. Companies have been kept busy 
pumping out the water, and it is now believed that the danger has been divert- 
ed as the present storm has much subsided. 



ROAD OIL COMPANY ELECTS NEW BOARD. 

The Maricopa Road Oil Company of Maricopa held its annual meeting 
on the 8th inst., and elected the following directors and officers: F. F. Weed, 
Vice-president; W. J. Schultz, Secretary -Treasurer; E. L. Weed, J. H. Gladdie. 
L. F. Gladdie. The Company controls ten flowing wells with a monthly 
rapacity of 6,000 barrels, also has 30,001! barrels of oil in storage. The opera- 
tions are greatly handicapped by the inability to secure cars. 



CITY ELECTRIC COMPANY TO USE FUEL OIL. 

The City Electric Company, a corporation formed for the purpose of 
supplying San Francisco with heat, light and power, has decided to locate 
its plant at North Beach. 

A. M. Hunt, the engineer of the corporation, under whose supervision the 
Independent Light and Power Company of this city was constructed, is making 
a study of the latest and most approved systems of the largest cities in the 
East. He left here several weeks ago for that purpose and will remain away 
about one mouth more. The company will equip its plant with apparatus 
especially adapted for the use of fuel oil, and is certain of having an inex- 
haustible supply of the California product. The North Beach sites under 
consideration are situated close to the water and the belt road, and will enable 
the company to receive at the very door of the plant carloads of oil shipped 
direct from the California oil fields. Should circumstances render it advis- 
able the oil will be shipped by water in tank steamers. 



DELUGE OF INDICTMENTS. 

The Grand Jury of Hancock County, Ohio, on the 13th inst. returned 939 
indictments against the Standard Oil Company of New Jersey, the Ohio Oil 
Company, the Solar Refining Company, the Buckeye Pipe Line Company, the 
Manhattan Oil Company, the Standard Oil Company of Ohio, John D. Rocke- 
feller, William Rockefeller, Henry Rogers, Wesley Tilford, Frank Q. Barstow, 
and F. T. Cnbbert. 

The indictments charge the above with being members of a trust, a com- 
bination of capital, skill and acts for the following purposes, to wit: 

"Petroleum and its products; to prevent competition in the manufacture, 
making, transportation, sale and purchase of said commodity within the 
county of Hancock aforesaid; to fix at a certain common standard figure the 
price of said commodity and its products whereby its price to the consumer 
is controlled and established in such a manner as to directly preclude a free 
and unrestrained competition among themselves in transporting, selling, 
purchasing, manufacturing and making petroleum within the county of Han- 
cock, aforesaid contrary to law." 



Henry Crocker and W. H. Avery Leave for London. 

Henry J. Crocker of the Graciosa Oil Company, California!! Petroleum 
Refineries Limited, and Coast Oil Transport Company, in company with \V. 11. 
Avery of the Toyo Kisen Kaisha (Oriental Steamship Company), have departed 
for London, England, to complete certain financial details of the 20,000,000- 
barrel oil contract awarded the California company some time ago. The oil 
is to be used by the Japanese liners. 

It was originally expected that Mr. M. Shirashi, the general manager of 
the steamship company, would make the trip with Mr. Crocker, but he was 
suddenly taken ill and ordered back to Japan by his physicians. 

All of the preliminary details of the contract have been arranged, but 
the financial end must be adjusted in England. It is expected that the deliv- 
ery of oil on this contract will begin in a short time. 



PACIFIC MINING A oil REPORTER. 



PRODUCTION OF FUELS IN 1905. 
Coal. 

the production 
hort tons, show in 
pounds, valued at 1476,1 
amounted tu 69,339,152 long tons 
•mpiircd with tin- production 
- in liHM, wm an increase of 1,1)20,662 long tons, or 6 
mthrncitc coal .-it the mines in 100S was $141,879, 
in 1904. 
bituminous coal (which includes semianthracitc and nil 
■Pinibi turn i nous and I ignite foals), amounted in 1905 to 315,259,491 short 

l, as compared with 278.659,689 shorl tons, valued 
,ooi, in 1904. Tin- increase in the production of bituminous coal 
in 190 ■ ' was therefore 36,599,802 shorl tons in quantity and - v 

in value. 

Coke. 

Tl k<- production of the United States in 1905, which included the 

output from 8,159 retort or by product ovens, amounted to 32,231,129 8hor1 
ts compared with 23,661,106 short tons in 1904. The increase in quantity 
in 1905 t"r«'tn 1904 was 8,570,023 short tons, oi 36.22 per cent. The total 
value was $72,476,196, as against sn;.]44.!Ml in 1904, a gain of $26,331,255, or 
.".7 per cent. The average price per ton in 1905 was $2.25 against $1.95 in 
1904. The average output from the by-product ovens in L905 was 1,158.8 
tons per oven, against an average of 365.8 tons per oven from the beehive 
Ovens. 

Gas, Coke, Tar, and Ammonia. 
The aggregate value of all the products obtained from the distillation of 
coal in gas works and retort ovens in L905 was $56,684,972, as against $51,157,- 
736 in 1904 and $ 17,830,600 in 1903 

Natural Gas. 
The value of the natural gas produced in 1905 was $41,562,855, as com- 
pared with $38,496,760 in 1904, with $35,807,860 in L903, with $30,867,863 
in 1902, with $27,066,077 in 1901, and with $23,698,674 in 1900— a gain of 
about x per cent in 1905 over 1904. 

Petroleum. 

The total production of crude petroleum in the United States in 1905 
was 134,717,580 barrels, as against HT.nsu.iHio barrels in 1904, 100,461,337 bar- 
in 1903, B8,766,916 barrels in 1902, and 69,389,194 barrels in 1904, an 
increase of 17,636,620 barrels, or 15 per cent over the production of 1904, and 
of about 34 pi r cent over that of 1903. 

The increase in 1904 came from Kansas and Indian Territory, and 
Oklahoma, Louisiana, Texas. California, Kentucky and Tennessee, and Illinois, 
in the order named. In round numbers, the gains in 1905 over 1904 were as 
follows: Kansas ami Indian Territory and Oklahoma, 6,395,000 barrels; Louis- 
iana, 5,950,000 barrels; Texas, 5,890,000 barrels; Kentucky and Tenni Bsee, 
219,000 barrels; and Illinois 181,000 barrels. The largest decreases in produc- 
tion in 1905, as compared with 1904, were in Ohio, which showed a decrease 
Of about 2,529,000 barrels; West Virginia, 1,066,000 barrels; Pennsylvania, 
688,000 barrels; Indiana, 374,000 barrels; and Colorado, 125,000 barrels. It 
will be observed that the greatest gains were in the South and West, and that, 
relatively, the Appalachian field lost heavily. 

The value of crude petroleum produced during 1905 was $84,157,399, or an 
average price of 62.47 cents a barrel, as against $101,175,455, or 86.41 cents 
a barrel in 1904, as against $94,694,050, or 94.20 cents a barrel in 1903. 



TO INTRODUCE "TEXAS LAW." 

Senator E. <>. Miller of Visalia, a member of the Democratic minority at 
Sacramento, has announced his intention of introducing a bill intended to 
break the Standard-Southern Pacific-Santa Pe car monopoly in California, 
Mr, -Milh-r expresses some doubt as to whether the Herrin combination will 
allow the measure proper recognition, but he promises to make a bitter fight 
for i he passage of I he bill. 

The bill is drafted much upon the familiar "Texas Law" and provided 
a ] '<■ n a It v of $25 per day demurage each day on each ear from the time 
ordered until supplied, Mr. Miller cites an instance of the independent oil 
producers being unable to ship their product on account of being refused an 
adequate Dumber of tank cars, although the Southern Pacific had a hundred 
and fifty and the Santa Pe eighty ears on a siding idle at the time. 

The ear situation has been a most distressing one for the past three 
years. :im| many companies have been put in sore straits by being repeatedly 

refused until their contracts were nullified. This often occurred after an at- 
tempt, had been made by the Standard to purchase the producing company's 
oil, ami a number of coincidences proved convincingly that the railroads and 
the Standard were in "cahoots" to gobble up the production. 

Oil men throughout the state should lend every aid possible to facilitate 
the passage of the measure which would do more, perhaps, than anything 
else, to put the oil business upon a legitimate competitive basis. 



WHERE ARE THE BARRELS MANUFACTURED? 

We have a let di ni inquiry fron 
ih. barn-Is an- ma nu fa. ured for "tilt 

have been produced Coriiia during 1905." Wi lake pleasure in an 

s we ring through the minimis of this journal 

directing to his address, thai the barrels are i ne place as 

an those used for barn lin^ the municipal water supply of the v. 



Oil Indications in Nevada. 

it i> reported thai in I hurcuill, abotil twentj miles from Wonder, unmis- 
takabh Bigns of petroleum oil have been discovered. In digging 

watei with an auger : isiderable flow of gas was encountered which could 

be ignited at the mOUth of the hole. Aboitl four feet helow the Burface was 

found a stratum of asphaltum, which, in itself, is n positive indication of the 
existence of peiroleuiii oil in greater or lesser quantities. 

The particular locality in which the oil indications have been f id is 

on a fla! al'oul two miles from Sand Springs, Man\ locators have florki d 
into the district, filing on ! lie most prom isi no. I:nnl. The surrounding country 
is said to be mostly unbroken hills, and are said to bear all the ear-marks of 

an oil field. One company has already been formed to drill, ami arrangements 
are now being made for the purchase of an outfit. 

The opening up of an oil field in Nevada would eclipSi a Moh.iwk. (n 
this country where all fuel is scarce, and where the Liquid fuel would readilj 
bring $2, or more, a barrel at the wells, the magnitude of such a discovery 
can readily lie appreciated. 



Inquiry Into Railroad Relations. 

The I liters tale Commerce I 'oin m issioii is at present engaged in probing 
into the affairs of the Southern Paeific and Union Pacific railway companies, 
with a view of determining the relations existing between the two. Agents 
galore are gathering evidence for the Commission, while the railroad com- 
panies are just as active in presenting their side of the ease. Much testimony 
has already been submitted. It is evidently the intention of the railroads to 
create as many "test cases" as possible, resorting to appeals, technicalities, 
and other delays in order to stave off the final decisions as long as possible. 

But the final result is a foregone conclusion. The Interstate Commerce 
Commission is now invested with adequate power to probe into and squash 
any and all combinations or manipulations in restraint of trade. It seems 
quite possible that eventually the railroad transportation problem will resolve 
itself into Government ownership, or, at least, Government control, either of 
which will finally result in the enjoyment of equal privileges by all without 
discrimination. 



LATEST SHIPPING NEWS. 

Petroleum for the Orient. 
The British steamer •'Seminole,'' chartered by the Stani ard nil Company, 
was cleared from San Francisco, January 4th, for Kurrachee and Bom buy, 
with 2,120,000 gallons of refined petroleum, in bulk, valued at $82,680.00. 

Petroleum for China. 
The British tank steamer ' ' I htkotah, chartered by the Standard Oil 
Company, cleared San Francisco, January lltli, for China, with a cargo of 
1,590,000 gallons of refined petroleum, in bulk, valued :it $72,010.00. 

More Petroleum for China. 
The British bark "Calcutta," chartered by the Standard Oil Company 
cleared San Francisco, January 11th, with a cargo of 856,192 gallons of re- 
fined petroleum, valued at $33,301.00. 

Tonowanda in Port. 
The British tank Steamer "Tonowanda'' arrived in port San Francisco. 
January 12th, twenty days from Yokohama, she was immediately re-charter- 
ed by the Standard Oil Company, and will leave in a few days for the orient 
with a cargo of refined petroleum, 

Japanese to Build Tank Steamers. 

The Toyo Kisen Kaisha (Oriental Steamship Company) which recently 
made a contract for a large quantity of California crude oil for use on its 
steamers, is said to be negotiating for the construction of four laror 
steamers for the transportation thereof. The plans and specifications for the 
new vessels have been prepared by M. shiraishi, General Manager and i 
man of the Board of Directors of the steamship company, and Dr. S. Tei 
i he consull ing engineer. 

The new steamers will have a displacemenl of about and a 

capacity of 65,000 barrels each. The building of other tankers foi thi 
will immediately follow the completion of tie- l; T i specific; 

already been submitted. Present indications point to a vei • large oil 
with Japan. 



6 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER. 



"POETEE" AND "NAVIGATOE" AREIVE. 

The tank steamer W. S. Porter and the Tug Navigator, two additions to 
the fleet of the Associated Oil Company on the Pacific, arrived at San Pran- 
eisco January 18th, 61 days from New York. The Porter towed the Navigator 
the entire distance, saving the company no less than $9,000 by so doing. The 
trip was practically uneventful, good weather having been enjoyed the entire 
voyage. 

The Porter is one of the largest tank steamers afloat under the American 
flag. She is 400 feet long, 50 foot beam, and has a carrying capacity of 
52,000 barrels. The vessel was built at Newport for the Associated Oil Com- 
pany last year at a cost of about $1,600,000. 

The tug Navigator has a history in the International yacht races, having 
been repeatedly used by judges and others in this service on the Atlantic. 
She was built in Camden, N. J., in 1898 by Dealogue & Sons. She is 134 feet 
in length, 26 foot beam and draws 16 feet. She has a mean average speed of 
13 knots and a maximum speed of 16 knots under forced draught. Her cost 
was $72,000. 

The Porter is already an oil burner but the Navigator at present burns 
coal fuel. She will, however, be immediately converted to an oil burner; 
probably before being put into service. 

The two vessels make noteworthy additions to the Associated 's fleet, and 
they attracted no little attention when they steamed into the bay on account of 
their neat and flashy appearance. They are painted red with black stacks and 
trimmings. The Porter has a crew of forty men with Captain Ole Barreson as 
Master. Captain G. McGoldick is Master of the Navigator, John McGoldick, 
First Officer, and Charles P. Bllege Second Officer. 

The Porter burns an average of one barrel of oil per mile which is a 
saving of probably 75 per cent on the cost of transportation. She will doubtless 
be used in the service with Japan, as it is understood that the Associated 
Oil company shares in the 20,p00,000 barrel contract, as well as some separ- 
ate contracts which it secured at the time. The Navigator will be used for 
the time for towing barges along the coast but will, it is said, be used in some 
Japanese port at a later date. 

COALINGA. 

Coalinga, Cal., Jan. 18, 1907. 

Owing to the unprecedented storms in this section for the past two 
weeks, there has been but little progress on the east side of this oil 
field, as the roads are impassable to all freight teams, or anything but 
the lightest conveyance. Absolutely no hauling can be done anywhere 
to start new work. 

The Wabash Oil Co. has most of the material on the ground for 
its No. 8 rig and will complete it as soon as the weather settles so tim- 
bers may be hauled. 

Inca No. 5 has completed spudding in and is making good progress 
with the work, and tlie Eliza Jane is also making hole rapidly. These 
wells are in proven territory where oil is reached at about 1000 feet, so 
that it will be but a short time before both will be producing. E. C. 
Baker is Supt. 

The Associated Oil Co. has taken over all of section 36-20-14 at a 
good figure, thus enlarging much on the holdings of that Company. 

Mr. Webb has sold the SE'A of' See. 6-21-15 for $500.00 per acre to 
Mr. Heanan and there have been several -interests in a part of the SWS 
of Sec. 6 transferred recently. 

J. W. Mallett and associates of San Francisco have taken over the 



This is 



30 acres in the SE J A of Sec. 14-20-14 and will develop the same, 
proven territory lying between the Inca and Coalinga Petroleum. 

The Manchester Oil Co. has made slow progress for the past two 
weeks because of the shortage of fuel, but has entered its sands at nearly 
1000 feet and now gives every indication of coming in as a first-class pro- 
ducer, thus enlarging this field by several miles. They are on 18-21-15. 

West Coalinga has been idle for the past 10 days on account of the im- 
possibility of getting fuel hauled to keep up steam. They will be able to 
start again about the first of the week. They are on Sec. 12-21-14. 

The Shreeve Oil Co. on Sec. 6-21-15 are still making good progress, having 
passed through 175 feet of good oil sand — the first heavy sand encountered 
by the Lucile Co. and are now just entering the big producing sand from 
which the Lucile has been getting its big flow. There is no question now but 
what this new company will become a producer within the next 15 days. They 
are now 2520 feet down. 

The Section Six Oil Co., a new company that has taken over the W% of 
NW% of See. 6-21-15, have their rig completed and will spud in in a few days. 
They have put up a very substantial 80 foot derrick and are in every way 
equipped to push work to a finish on their No. 1 well. They expect to have to 
go to a depth of a little over 2000 feet, or a little less than the Shreeve. 

The Independent Producers Association are gaining rapidly in membership 
and are now in condition to have something to say about the price that should 
be paid for oil in this field and are receiving better offers than ever for the 
Coalinga product. It promises to go still higher. 

Selling agent S. W. Morshead of Fresno has been spending considerable 
time here recently perfecting .the necessary arrangement for the most profit- 
able and expeditious handling of the oil here, and getting in new members for 
the Company. The organization is now fully effected and on a substantial 
basis. 

Dr. Hadley, one of the largest stockholders and a director of the Shreeve 
Oil Co. was in the City from Los Angeles for a few days this week. 

Mr. Wilcox, an oil man from San Francisco, was in the field for a few 
days the first of the week looking for investments for himself and associates 
and looking after their already large holdings. 

As soon as the weather is settled the Coalinga field will take on a greater 
boom than it has seen for many years. This new impetus is caused by the 
extensive enlarging of the known field and the greatly increased price for oil. 

California Monarch No. 13, Sec. 26, 19-15, is now doing a regular produc- 
tion of 350 barrels daily. The oil is being sold to the Standard Oil Company 
on daily runs. No. 1, on Sec. 31, 19-15, made its periodical flow last week at 
the rate of 1200 barrels daily. The other wells of the company are producing 
regularly and uninterruptedly. 

California Diamond No. 5 is over 2,000 feet and is going ahead nicely. 

Caribou Oil Company is making good progress with well No. 12 which 
will hereafter be known as No. 11 to take the place of old No. 11, recently 
abandoned. No. 12 will spud in shortly. 

WEST EXTENSION OF COALINGA. 

C. W. Hall, prominently identified with the organization of the Michigan 
Oil & Development Company in the White Creek district, has recently organ- 
ized several additional companies to operate on holdings secured by him west 
of the proven Coalinga field and in the White Creek district. These companies, 
it is said, will shortly commence drilling in several localities to prove the 
territory. 

The operations of these companies will be watched with a great deal 



Hammond 
Iron Works 

Warren, Pa. 

U. S. A. 



Builders of 

Steel Tanks 

of the 

Highest 

G-rade 




Stills 

Condensors 

Agitators 

General 

Oil Refinery 

Work 



SALES AGENTS 

Herman Nieter 

29 Broadway 
New York. 

Krumbhaar&Aiken 

201 Defiegre Building 
New Orleans 



PACIFIC MINING & nil. REPORTER. 



M r. i 

i. and thut «>il should ! rough- 

out ti. • at dyke **( 

raced throu ghoul the entire 
l»r«>k"-u up in plnces, but, on the whole, following 

HI 1m 

I upon with favor b) 

The White Creek district itself bean all the ear-raarlu of b ricu oil field. 
Mr. Hull bat secured practically a township of territory in the locality, b 

! i Wis ezpec 
- he will have, iu h ; s various companies, sufficient territory ou which t <> 
carry on unlimited operati 

We always adm re the pluck of any enterprise in unproven territory, albeit 
may I" moat promising ts, and we are sure thai Mr. Hall has tbi hi I 

il iu his enterprise. If the venture proves successful it will 
alculable profit to those who have put their money into the companies. 

EASTERN EXPORTS. 

Following are the exports <>i" mineral oils from the Eastern ports of the 
United States for the month of December, L906: 



Crude 

X» w York . 
Philadelphia 
Galveston . . 



il 

Naphthas- 
Baltimore . . . . 
New York . . . 
Philadelphia . 



Quant itiea. 


Values. 


Gallons 


Dollars. 


3,590 


215 


5,693,717 


389,359 


5,970,669 


298,655 


1 L,567,976 


688,229 


1,000 


201) 


283,829 


51,075 


1,205,337 


106,643 



Total 

Illuminating — 

Baltimore 

Boston and ' Iharlestown 

New York 

Philadelphia 

Galveston 



1,490,166 



157,018 



1,392,166 


111,377 


12,681 


1,294 


43,229,902 


2,774,712 


21,288,233 


1,129,743 


187,283 ■ 


17,792 



Total 

Lubricating and paraffin — 

Baltimore 

Boston and Chariest own 

New York 

Philadelphia 

Galveston 

Total 

Residuum — 

New York 

Philadelphia 

Galveston 



66,110,265 4,034,918 



Total 

Total minineral oils — 
Baltimore 



372,020 


49,023 


16,847 


2,746 


7,266,864 


1,008,140 


3,481,110 


347,977 


24,450 


3,423 


11,161,291 


1,411,309 


14,120 


987 


7,869,288 


238,267 


286,639 


8,950 


8,170,047 


248,204 


1,765,186 


160,600 



and Charlosio 



Philadelphia 

• ii 



Total 



THE OIL MARKET 





1,040 








2,21 1,989 


1,041 




98,499 





Russian Position. 

The quotations on the Baku market have 

past fortnight, and the quoti r I rud | n apt & Lusted 

somewhat, bj after advi ing to -"■'■', copecks per pood the bow 

■ .1 t.. 2:i'_. copecks per | I. For forward delivery i has ad- 

.1 i'._. copecka, and aon stands at 25 copecks pi r i I Very (air business 

has l ii done recently in Crude oil for forward delivery, 

The quotatioi Por Residuals has advanced during tin fortnight '. copeck 

i" -■" pecks per p I. and the price for Kerosene free 'ail Baku has a] a 

advanced '_■ copeck to -"'j copecks per pood. 

The quotation for Kerosene for delivery f, o. b. vessel on the Caspian See 
has remained unchanged al 27 copecks per | I. 

At Baku the position is satisfactory, the strikes thai had taken place 
at our or two of the factories having been satisfactorily settled. 

The production of the Baku fields for the month of November, old style, 
amounted to 11,499,000 poods which is very satisfactory serin- 1 1 1 ;i t il is 
a sort month. 

Indian Position. 

Tin: re lias lieen no change in the quotations for the various lamp oils on 
the Indian markets during the past fortnight. The volume of business has 
been slightly reduced, but the market is firm. 

The prices were as follows: 
Bombay — ■ Rupees 

American ease oil 4. 

Russian case oil 4. 

' ' Elephant ' ' oil in tins 3. 

Sumatra ' ' Rising Sun ' ' in tins 3. 

Borneo oil in bulk 2. 

Burmah oil in bulk 2. 

Karachi — 

American case oil 4. 

Burmah oil in tins 3. 

Borneo oil in tins 2. 

Sumatra oil in bulk 2. 

American oil in bulk 2. 

Calcutta — 

American ease oil 4. 

Russian case oil .• 4. 

Burmah oil in bulk 2. 

Borneo oil in bulk 2. 

Sumatra oil in bulk 3. 

American oil in bulk 3. 

English Position. 

During the past fortnight the market in American and Russian lamp oils 
in London and Liverpool has been strong, and the quotations have advanced 
considerably, the deliveries having increased owing to the wintry weather 
which has been experienced during and since Christinas. 

The quotations were as follows: 
London 

Russian oil 5%d. ex wharf in barrels. 

American oil 6%d. @ 6%d. ex wharf in barrels. 
Liverpool 

Russian oil 6Vti. @ 6%d. ex wharf in barrels. 

American oil 6%d. (a) 7d. ex wharf in barrels. 



8. 


0. 


2. 


0. 


10. 


0. 


10. 


0. 


8. 


0. 


8. 


0. 


0. 


0. 


3. 


0. 


14. 


0. 


14. 


0. 


14. 


0. 


6. 


6. 


4. 


0. 


13. 


0. 


13. 


0. 


3. 


0. 


3. 


0. 



Exports of Domestic Mineral Oil From the Pacific Ports of the United States, and Shipments to Alaska and 

Hawaii, During November, 1906 



CUSTOMS DISTRICTS 
AND COUNTRIES 






NAPHTHAS 


MINERAL OIL, 


■REFINED OR MANUFACTURED 




CRUDE 


ETC. 


ILLUMINATING 


LUBRICATING, ETC. 


RESIDUUM, ETC. 


Domestic Exports — 

Alaska 


Gallons 


Dollars 


Gallons 

160 

2IO 


Dollars 
S3 
31 


Gallons 

1,470 

297 

550 

5.586,185 


Dollars 

2S2 

So 

98 

256.970 


Gallons Dollar* 

339 [ 8S 

3,670 1,323 

40 18 

12.443 4.543 


1 iallons 


Dollars 


Puget Sound 


400,110 


8,014 


4.553 

1,178 
l.IOO 


318 
7 2 


San Diego 


San Francisco 






20,210 


J. U4 


57 


Total Domestic 


4O0,IIO 


S.OI4 


20,580 


2,228 


5.588,502 


257.430 


16.492 5.972 


6,831 


447 


Shipments to Alaska— 

From Puget Sound 






17.138 ! 


2,850 


30.575 
340 


6,603 


0.765 1.8S0. 






1 ' San Francisco 






56 50S 320 






Shipments to Hawaii— 

From San Francisco 


3,460,800 


49,440 


4L530 


4.831 43.500 


7.214 23.7S8 7,546 ' 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPOETEB. 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 

The Oil and Mining Authority of the Pacific Coast 
Published Semi-Monthly by 

Pacific Oil Reporter Company 

Incorporated 



EDWARD S. EASTMAN 
MARIA R. WINN 
KARL R. EASTMAN 



Managing Editor 

Secretary- Treasurer 

Field Manager 



OFFICE AND EDITORIAL ROOMS 

Suite 37 Saint Mungo Building, 1300 Golden Gate Avenue 

San Francisco, California 

TELEPHONE WEST 6677 

Subscription price, $2.00 per year, in advance, to any part of the United States, Canada 
or Mexico. Add $1.00 for foreign subscriptions. 

Entered as second-class matter Nov. 5th, 1906, at the Post Office at San Francisco, Cal.. 
under an Act of Congress of March 3, 1S79. 



WEST SIDE COALINGA PRODUCERS INAUGURATE INDEPENDENT 

MOVE. 

S. W. Morsehcad, president of the California Oil Producers' Association, 
an incorporation organized about a year ago with the object of promoting 
the better interests of the producers of California, has, it is said, secured 
options and pledges on 73 per cent of the production of the west-side field, 
at 30 cents per barrel, and will immediately incorporate the combination into 
a company by itself. Back of the transaction is John A. Bunting, one of the 
most successful of California oil operators, who made a fortune in Kern River, 
and who, it is said, will now finance the new association to the full extent 
of its requirements. 

There is a strong suspicion that the California Oilfields Limited is work- 
ing hand in hand with this new organization, and that if the Dallas pipe line 
project is now carried through it will provide for the shipping of both com- 
anies' production. It is currently reported that Mr. Morsehead's project 
calls for the building of such a line, and it is just as emphatically declared 
that the California Oilfields Limited has the same object in view. It is the 
coincidence that leads to the conclusion that an understanding has been 
effected. 

What the plans of the companies may be, no one outside of those closely 
connected with the'm seems to know. There is plenty of reasons why they 
should be reticent. Whatever the outcome may be it is another point gained 
in the general move for better prices, which already seems to be assured. 
Many Coalinga producers are loath to accept the present price offered for 
their production and will not consider a proposition of entering into long 
time contracts, preferring rather to associate themselves together and market 
their own production. The outcome will be looked forward to with interest. 



STANDARD SHORT OF OIL. 

There is a well founded rumor afloat to the effect that the Standard 
Oil Company is short of oil for the operation of its great Point Richmond 
refinery and that drastic measures are being resorted to in a vaiu endeavor to 
secure a greater supply. 

In former days of "over production" before a market was secured for 
its entire output, the Union Oil Company sold some oil to the Standard Oil 
Company. But the monopoly now gets very little of the output of the Santa 
Maria field — none whatever from the Union. Its entire receipts in that field 
is said to not exceed 5,000 barrels daily, taxing its eight inch line to Port 
Harford to only about one-fifth of its capacity. Its quarter of a million 
barrels of tankage capacity is dry and rusty, and its entire system iu that field 
is indicative of a rapidly receeding prestige. The situation seems to bear 
witness that the Standard ventures in the Santa Maria field will be as great a 
"white elephant" as is its Bakersfield-Point Richmond line. 

In the Coalinga field the situation is getting to be an extremely embar- 
rassing one for the Standard. The California Oilfields Limited has shut down 
practically all of its wells and its officers state emphatically that they will 
stay shut down until such time as a better price can be secured. This shut 
down includes the new acquisitions of the Limited as well as the old to the 
extent of all of the production not called for on existing contracts. This cuts 
the monopoly down to a very limited amount from the Coalinga field, 5,000 
barrels daily probably representing its receipts. With a useless pipe-line to 
Bakersfield, where it has about 15,000,000 barrels of oil in storage. The 
Standard finds itself with probably 10,000 barrels daily with which to operate 
a refinery with a daily capacity of 25,000 barrels. 

The failure of the Bakersfield-Point Richmond pipe-Hue put the Standard 
in a very awkward position in the Kern River field. It had contracted large 
quantities of oil which it could not handle and the only resort was to put it 
into storage until it could be disposed of. Its lo,000,0UU barrels of oil now 
stored in that field stands as a monument to a most ignominous blunder. 

The building of the Bakersfield-Point Richmond line was greeted at the 
time by everyone except the Standard officials as being a most foolhardy ven- 
ture. Practical pipe-line men unanimously stated that it was a foregone 
failure. And as such it has been fully proven. The number of pumping sta- 
tions were doubled in number, the oil super-heated, and other efforts made to 
get the oil through the line without any marked degree of success, and as 
the proposition now stands the line is a failure so far as the 14 gravity of 
Kern River is concerned. However, a branch line to the Coalinga field was 
laid from Mendota pumping station, and the north half of the line is used 
for the oil the monopoly is enabled to secure from Coalinga, the product of the 
latter field being lighter in gravity and easily pumped through a pipe-line. 

At the present time the Standard is said to be making an attempt to tie 
up the production of the Sunset-Midway field with very little encouragement. 
Twenty-seven and one half cents has been offered and thirty asked. Other 
companies, however, are after the cream of the production with a strong like- 
lihood that they will secure it before the Standard comes to lite. 

Whatever the successes the monopoly may have been in other parts of 
the United States, its movements in California have been but a series of ex- 
tremely unsuccessful ventures. From the building of the Bakersfield-Point 



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PDBLIC IAVOR CENTERS ON NEVADA. 

■ II K. i.l.l of the Mcyi i Keidcl ( •• i 

■ <l in :in in!, rview i<> :i ' 

■ ly thai the present situation all 
ihc unmistakable forecast "i an impending 

matters in Nevada. They declare thai 
liroughoul i he n 

vrorlil has ever hcretofi d in tin- history of mi tevelopment. 

that in ih. infallible siens as disclosed by tin 1 daily n 
conditions in this country an. I also in Europe, im early that 11 

nf public favor can no held in check. When asked what the partic- 

ular conditions art', which at this time favor this mark, t activity in wi 
mining securities, Mr. Meyer in part said: 

"During the past two years tin- investing public has to sot xteni I n 

familiarized with tin truth about Wall Street stocks, through the writings of 

ou, rda Tarbell, and others. In consequence investmcnl funds have in 

measure been withdrawn from the Wall Street channel, ami a pari "i 

this money has found its waj int" Nevada mining ventures. 

"During a contemporaneous period tie western cteserl mines have been 

undergoing an <r:i of mi'i' dented development, made possible only through 

the innovation of tin' automobile which has now come t" !»• the only practical 
vehicle for desert travel. By its as,- a point one hundred miles of more re- 
moved from any base of supplies is brought within easy traveling distance, 
whereas, formerly such a trip int" a desert would have always been attended 
by great peril, owing i" the lack or' water. Mining properties heretofore 

practically inaccessible have thus I n plan-, I within the easy possibility of 

examination. Through this change the old time improvident ami financially 
restricted prospector has yielded up his place to a new school of mine hunters, 
financially much better equipped t" exploit ami develop surface prospects. 
This class of exploitation lias prepared the desert country more quickly for 
no nt railroad development, which has followed closely in the tracks 
"t the automobile. 

"With an abundant ami constantly increasing supply of funds available 
for prospecting ami development purposes, Nevada lias had during the past 
two years a fine opportunity to demonstrate the merit of her splendid mineral 
resources. Her mining record testifies as to how well she lias improved this 
opportunity. 

"The most astonishing achievement seems to me to be that up to this 
date, there is practically no person who has dca.lt in Nevada mining stocks 
at a loss, but on the contrary the record has been one of universal profit. It 
is indeed asserted, and I believe truthfully so, that in these two years Nevada 
has produced one hundred men now rated as millionaires. These undisputed 
facts effectually nullify the wail of warning which now eniinates from greedy 
Wall Street, alarmed as it is to the last degree by the steady drainage, for 
west, m and milling investments, of funds, which have heretofore been flowing 
in an uninterrupted stream into New York City. These profitable investments 
of funds in western mining slocks have so stimulated the production of goal 
in Nevada as to place Ilia! state third on the list of gold producers in the 
United States last year, and if I lie present ratio of increase continues, she will 
rank number one, in 1907. 

"The banks and mining companies of the Nevada gold belt hold thirty 
millions of money ill their vaults, while they are also credited with thirty 
millions in New York, and a like sum in the California metropolis. 

"Nevada has within the past i"ll days developed a mine at Goldfield 
which holds the world's record of production for the same period of operation. 
The sum produced to dale exceeds eleven million of bullion. Two carloads 
of oie from this famous mine, valued at two million dollars, are now held 
by Hie Goldfield banks in whose banking houses the sacks of 'high-grade' are 
being stacked like wheat in a grainary. This remarkable specimen ore is 
sin. ii to In' shipped through the East, and displayed to the incredulous as o-ular 

proof of the vast wealth of the desert. 

The strongest evidence of the confidence of the Goldfield mine operators 
in the permanency of their own camp is furnished by their records of recent 
real estate transactions in Goldfield where every desirabh available business 
lot has been picked up at a price ranging from ten thousand dollars to thirty 
thousand dollars per lot. Front a local contractor and builder f learn that 
he has contracts for more than five hundred thousand dollars worth of business 

houses, all of stone, and i tern construction, to I rected on these lots as 

soon as material is available, and he assures me that these improvements 
are being undertaken by men who are in a position to know accurately about 
the real merits of the mines, because in all cases they are directly interested 
in and associated with I lie active mining operations of the camp. 

"The above facts are fully supported by the records of such mines as 



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JOHN J. DUFFIE, President T. J. DONOW 

Directors, J. W. HENDERSON, JOHN J. DUFFIE 



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to Investors 

The Truitt lease on the Mohawk in Millionaires' Row, with 
the Hayes-Monnette and the Frances-Mohawk, has proved 
one of the most sensational producers in the camp. It is 
handled hy Truitt 's Leasing Company, which sold stock last 
spring to begin operations. Not a pick was stuck in the ground 
until late in May, yet in September this company declared a 
dividend of 25 cents a share out of the earnings, which was 
100 per cent on the investment, and the company announces 
its intention of paying ten more dividends of 25 cents each 
before the first of the year. 

Nowhere else does money work so quickly or earn so enorm- 
ous a wage. 

Our GOLD-HORN LEASE Expires 
September 30, 1908 

We are developing our lease on broad lines designed for big 
work, sinking at this moment a double compartment shaft. 
We have shippers Bast, North, South, and West, and have 
every reason to believe that we will encounter large bodies 
of high-grade ore in some of the mineralized ledges passing 
through our lease. 



We have the same formation and ledges as the Velvet (which 
adjoins us on the northwest). Fortunes have been made all 
around us. We confidently expect to make enormous and fab- 
ulous profits for all who go in with us. We commenced to sink 
October 1, 1906, with twenty-four months to run. When we 
open rich ore, our stock will rise by LEAPS AND BOUNDS. 



FACTS 



We own a long, valuable lease on gold-bearing ground in 
Goldfield. 

We own 20 acres of proven territory in Bullfrog Mining 
District, near Gold Bar Mine. 

We have purchased for our Gold-Horn Lease the latest elec- 
trical hoisting machinery. 

Our officers are among the big mine makers of Nevada. 

We should ship ore and distribute profits before April 1st. 

Life of our Gold-Horn Lease is twenty-two months. 

Stock to be listed on San Francisco and Goldfield Exchanges. 

In ordinary mining you take risks. Mining by leasing con- 
tains smallest element of risk, and profits should be enormous 
and quick. 

Vou can purchase Goldfield Gold-Horn Mining and Leasing 
Corporation stock to-day for 20c a share. 

Only 100,000 shares to be sold at 20c ; you should act quickly. 
Order NOW by wire. 



d 

tl 
d 



a 

? 

ci 

f 

I 






PACIFIC MINIMI & OIL REPORTER. 

Mining Has Made More People Rich Than Any Other Industry 



11 



jA 






GOLD HORN 



GENERAL VIEW or THE 

■"HAWK, COMBINATION 

'^FLORENCE and 
3MBINATION MINES, 

OLDFIELD, NEVADA 

U.S. A. 

^»--0f|£uO.NF-U.|»06. 



FIELD, NEVADA 



and Leasing Corporation 



$1,000,000 



Treasury Stock, $400,000 



ce-President W. R. MARKT, Secretary and Treasurer 

J. DONOVAN C. L. KNOWLTON, W. R. MARKT 



Pay Biggest and Quickest Dividends 

d camp is not three years old, and the daily pro- 
yellow metal has reached the $100,000 mark, or at 
1,000,000 per month, most of which is being pro- 
easing companies. A good leasing company on a 
is a good thing for investors and stockholders; for 
heir money is put directly in the ground and the 
often quick and profitable. Several leasing com- 
', just paid dividends. There are a score of other in- 
leases that soon will enter the producing and divi- 
g list. 

diet that more dividends will be paid out by leasing 
during the coming year than from all the other 
of the camp working on company accoiint put to- 
Sditorial Goldfield "News." 



k advanced in one year from 1 5 cents to $20.00 
That's a profit good enough for any one. 
ind Jumbo are to-day beyond the financial reach 
us. But there will be other Mohawks in Gold- 
;r all, it only required development work on the 
to open up its vast ore bodies. Red Top, 
Jold-Horn and St. Ives, all in line and directly 
e Mohawk, are in line for Mohawk's success. 



For a Limited Time We Offer 

Fifty thousand shares of the treasury stock at 
twenty cents per share. 

This allotment will soon be over-subscribed. We 
have no salaried officers, a healthy treasury, and 
no debts. This is an opportunity of TO-DAY. 

Wire your subscription immediately, and remit 
by mail. Address : 

W. R. MARKT, 

322 Bush St., San Francisco, Cal. 
References: 

Italian-American Bank, San Francisco. 
Nevada Bank & Trust Co., Goldfield. 



12 



PACIFIC MINING- & OIL REPORTER. 



the 'Silver Pick,' ' Eetl Top,' 'Mohawk,' 'Jumbo,' 'Atlanta,' 'C. O. D.,' 'Gold 
Bar,' 'Blue Bull,' and its newest neighbor, The Goldfield Bank property, in 
which an extensive body of valuable ore has just been encountered. 

"These and many other conditions combine, to argue that a period of 
substantial prosperity is at hand for all legitimate mining enterprises in 
Nevada in general, and at Goldfield in particular." 



NEVADA. 

GOLDFIELD. 

Special Correspondence. Goldfield, Nevada, January lath. 

Goldfield district, most conspicuous of all the camps of Nevada, the state 
most prominently in the mining limelight of today, is passing through a period 
of trouble and tribulation, its first of consequence. That the trying experience 
will leave the marvelous territory uninjured is the belief of all who make it 
their abode and scene of operations, together with the better informed of 
outside investors whose holdings of stocks make them interested parties. 

Cities and towns and mining camps are all alike in that their worth is 
proved by ability to surmount obstacles. Chicago was a village before the fire. 
San Francisco, since her horror of last spring, is rebuilding to a glory that 
will put to blush her former self. That same disaster threatened the ruin of 
the Nevada camp of Manhattan and would have accomplished it if Manhattan 
had lacked the merits of a phoenix. Men qualified to judge are confident 
that Goldfield will come forth from the fiery furnace of strikes and venomous 
criticism purified and refined, just as her ores are turned to pure gold by 
harsh treatment that proves the death of the dross. 

Those who have closely followed the trend of events in Nevada are hardly 
cognizant of the apparent adversities which have composed Goldfield 's refining 
ordeal, stretching over a period of more than a month. Just ten of the stages 
of the trying-out process are enumerated for their enlightenment: 

One. Pyrotechnic advances were scored by all the leading stocks prior 
and subsequent to the merger of five great securities into the fifty-million 
dollar Goldfield Consolidated Mines Company, last November. There followed 
the natural and logical profit-taking that resulted in a perceptible decline 
all along the line. 

Two. Unscrupulous or ignorant writers sent broadcast false reports of 
intentional caving of the Mohawk mine, alarming some of the more timid. 

Three. The coming of Yuletide exerted the same depressing influence 
on the Goldfield market as was evident at every other center of trade in 
whatever security, wheat in Chicago, meat in Omaha, cotton in New Orleans, 
or railroads in New York. To aggravate natural conditions in Goldfield, many 
of the largest dealers in mining shares hied them to distant homes for the 
holidays and many who remained reckoned more of stockings than stocks, 
dwelt longer upon the toy bulls and bears on the Christmas tree than upon 
the real ones on 'change. 

Pour. Along toward the close of the year banks have an exasperating 
habit of calling in all available funds and releasing the minimum. Money 
tightened here, as everywhere. 

Five. Wretched weather, perennial snows, bitter cold and a fuel famine 
ensued. Sam Jones said no man ever got religion with cold feet. No more 
are cold feet conducive to enthusiasm in stock investment. It has been said 
by those of old that the fellow who abruptly cashed in at the game of draw 
had cold feet. 

S'x, Contemporaneously with the miserable weather and the fuel shortage 



came slow railway service, a delay of mails and almost a suspension of tele- 
graphic communication. 

Seven. Dr. J. Grant Lyman, a New York gentleman who launched and 
piloted the Union Securities Company, had a falling out with a Chicago broker. 
The man from the Windy City was interviewed and many papers printed false 
rumors discrediting Goldfield. 

Eight. Every intelligent resident of Goldfield, where all residents are 
intelligent, knows that for all these many months fabulously rich ore lias 
been purloined from some of the mines by employees coming off shift. For 
a long time little attention was paid to the thefts. Last month some arrests 
were made and some of the stolen ore was intercepted in transit. A strike 
was declared by the miners. Lurid and consistently false reports of the labor 
situation were wired all over America. Yellow journals said the camp was 
decimated, with red riots the sole diversion of all who remained. 

Nine. Some papers and magazines, already possessed of the animus and 
waiting only for an opportune moment, opened upon Goldfield their batteries 
of libel, calumny and spite-inspired vilification, the expression of a jealousy- 
born hatred that had long been brewing. Nevada suffered from the onslaught 
of printers' ink, for some of the unwary credulous were inclined to believe 
the printed slanders. 

Ten. To cap it all came the financial difficulties of one of the most 
widely advertised promotion houses in Nevada, the Sullivan Trust Company. 
As this is written the outcome is uncertain and judgment as to blame for the 
Sullivan Company's predicament is suspended; but that the episode proved 
an injury to legitimate promotions and bona fide securities, coming as it did 
just after the outset of such papers as Ridgeways, cannot be gainsaid. 

Set opposite the foregoing ten adversities might be named scores of 
advantages possessed by Goldfield. In fairness, however, only an equal number 
of citations are listed as evidence that Goldfield will come from the trial 
unscathed or proving that such opinion is entertained by men whose intimacy 
with conditions entitles their judgment to serious consideration: 

One. After the calling of the strike there was no diminution of ore ship- 
ments from Goldfield district. On the other hand there was recorded a steady 
increase. Notice of the miners' demands was served on December twentieth. 
Ore shipments from Goldfield for the week ending December 22nd, were Tb'S 
tons, for the week ending December 29th, 1,395 tons, and for the week ending 
January 5th, 2,290 tons, this last sum not including 821 tons handled by the 
leased plant of the Nevada Goldfield Reduction Company, which would swell 
the total tonnage of the third week of strike rule to 3,111, an increase of 
2,343 tons over the first week, a gain of over 305 per cent. Such production 
in the face of unfavorable conditions and widely circulated libels is hardly 
indicative of a waning camp. 

Two. On the second day of January, the richest shipment of ore ever 
made by any mine in the history of America was expressed from the Haycs- 
Monnette lease on the Mohawk to the Selby smelter near San Francisco. The 
consignment was thirty-odd tons, averaging in value about $20,000 the ton, 
the lot being worth approximately $700,000. Throughout the last several weeks 
of its life that lease produced a daily average of $30,000 worth of gold ore. A 
few days after the Hayes-Monnette shipment mentioned, the Frances lease on 
the same mine sent out by express thirty tons of unsorted ore that was worth 
about a quarter of a million dollars. Such mines in auy man 's camp are a 
sufficient answer to the knocker's effusions. 

Three. Eastern capitalists, represented by Col. O. P. Posey, are build- 
ing a mammoth smelter in Goldfield. Col. Posey is a mining and smelting man 



IviVOY MiV^UI^AO'TURIIVG^ OOJVIF»iVIVY 



Manufacturers of 



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Orfiee, 334 riofth JVIain Stfeet, Iios Angeles, Cal. 



PACIFIC MINING & oil. REPORTER. 



13 



■imclti r» 

■•■I I'lnini in 

'in' rountr) 

g into Ihojti' 

i hur 

lull was at ita lioigbl and 
rtml threatening 
iiritiea liavi been Qoldfield citi- 
among all claaai nnd speculators better knows the 

I mines closed down, pending settlement of tin 
rind, many leases remained active as l"ne as their options lived 
number of mines, notably among tin.*,- of the i< 

isl a shift, paying the scale of wages demanded 

■ arc owned b> .-. bo are handing 

around five dollars a day t.. unskilled laborers for sentiment's sake. 

The T pah i Id railroad i I Go • ear ago 

ber. Long e I loldfieJd paid for it s eon- 

ion and equipment. There ure now well defined rumors to the effect 
thai this line is to !"• bougbl bi the Southern Pacific. Ii staDds to reason 

that a snug sum will be required !•■ close the deal. Transportati agnates 

build ami buy railroads because them to pay, financially. These 

particular ones are well aware that Southern Nevada's onlj natural resource 
is mineral. 

q firm of Goldfield contractors has in process of building 
il' of structures in this city of 13,1)00 population. Those men state 
that by th" first of next Ma} their contracts will aggregate a half-million 
dollars and an equal figure will not exaggerate the value of building con- 
tracts held by other firms. This one milli lollars' worth of orders is not 

for hospitals or morgues or gravestones. 

Nine. The Sunsel Telephone company is planning the installation of 
,-i six wire service to connect San Francisco with Goldfield, Tonopah and 

Manhattan. Dead men tell no long-distat tales. 

Ten. The county seat of Esmeralda county is going to be removed from 

Hawthorne to Goldfield this year. Goldfield pays about one-third of the 

tl taxes of I lie county. Who ever heard of dead men paying poll-tax! 

Heavy buying orders continue to pour into the Goldfield exchange, the 

decline of prices to the contrary notwithstanding. Several times recently all 

wire communication with San Francisco was cut off, yet the Goldfield 

is allowed no resultant drop in quotations or a lessoning of volume. 

Prices are beginning to display an upward tendency ami many of the best 

informed are confident that rock bottom was reached on the first week of 

• 

Goldfield securities which just now appear to be exceptionally good buys 

are Black Butte, Blue Bull, Booth. Columbia Mountain, Combination Fraction, 

Daisy, Diamondfield, Dixie, Eureka, Coalfield Columbia, Goldfield 

Bolidated, Great Bend, Jumbo Extension, Kewana, Skylark, Triangle, 

Vernal and Yellow Rose. This list, however, does not purport to name all the 

- I ones. The stocks mentioned therein are far below intrisie values ami 

give particular promise of s| rty advance. The same thing might be said 

of a score of others. 

Readers familiar with the geography of the district will ntoice that 
several of the securities listed above represent mines situated in the Diamond- 
field portion of Goldfield district. It is a fact that this section is coming 

to tlie fi t more rapidly than any other one area of Goldfield 

district, development considered. It is the scene of operations of 

"Diamondfield -lack" Davis, who chose il above all others when he first 

cauo to .■.■imp and has by repeated si esses found substantiation of his good 

judgment. Goldfield Skylark-, one of his latest pets to receive flattering ex- 
ploitation attention, is responding generously with a fine showing of gold 
ore and will doubtless rank in time with Daisy, (treat Bend and Black Butte. 
Skylark is not yet listed, lint will lie soon, in San Francisco and Goldfield. 

Well behaved stocks in Bullfrog district are Amethyst, Banner, Central, 
Daisy, Gibralter, Gold Bar, Golden Sceptre, Lige Harris, Mayflower Con- 
solidated, Montana. Montgomery Shosl Extension, Nugget, Original, Pedes- 
tal, Trani]i Consolidated, Victor ami Yankee Girl. Bullfrog Pedestal, named 
above, will lie one of the first listings of this year in Goldfield and San 
Francisco. There are many other stocks in the booming camp of Bullfrog, 
which will demonstrate great strength within the next few weeks. 

Worthy of favorable mention among the stocks of Manhattan are Broncho. 
Buffalo, chipmunk. Combination, Consolidated, Consolidated Extension, Dex- 
ter. Giant. Key. Little Joe, Manhattan Mining. Sedan, Seylor-IIumplirey, 
Whale, Wolftone, Yellow Horse and Zanzibar. There tire others. One of the 
most sensational discoveries in the history of the camp was recently made on 
th' Annie Laurie claim oi' the Manhattan Mining Company's group, a full 



■!'■ on the |2i foot 

per ton. 

• uts are I'.. In ■ 

Goll Inn Crown, Home. .Inn But 

rtli Star. I,', s. n. . Tonopah Mining and Weal v.-ai 

io nit '« greatest prodnetion Idemls. 

B & R PAPERS for Sheathing Dwelling 

Are Unequalled. 

Write lot samples and prices. 

BONESTELL, RICHARDSON & CO. 

California's Leading Paper House 
173 <'• (8s SIXTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



BANK OF SANTA MARIA 

Capital and Surplus $150,000.00 

The Pioneer Bank of the Oil Regions 

Solicits the Accounts of Oil Men and Investors 



I has. Bradley, President 

B. Pezzoni, Vice-President 

Paul 0. Tictzen, Manager and Cashier 

L. P. Searoni, Assistant Cashier 



Santa Maria 

California 



PRIVATE R00HS 



JULES WITTMAN 



Jules' Restaurant 

Only First-Class Restaurant in Burned District 
Formerly 315-323 Pine Street 

Regular Dinner, with Wine, 75 cts. 
Sundays and Holidays, $1 00 

OPEN EVENINGS 

326 BUSH STREET, Bet. Montgomery and Kearny. San Francisco 



Steel Oil Tanks 

Refineries Erected Complete 

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Nathan-Dohrman Co. 6 machines Union Trust Bank . . 5 machines 

Cal. Safe Deposit Bank 5 " Cal. Wine Ass'n 6 

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1820 Fillmore Street 

Telephone West 6288 
Branches:— Lob Angeles. Portland, Seattle, Spokane, 
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14 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER. 



In Fairview district, youngest of the lot, exceptionally desirable securi- 
ties are Aztec, Condors, Dromedary Hump, Eagle, Fairview Mining, Florence, 
Lookout, Nevada Hills, Pyramid, Bed Bock Seymour and Silver King. Nevada 
Hills, the first shipper and dividend payer, is the hub. Fairview Eagle will 
very shortly enter the same list, being one of the Wingfield-Nixon bonanzas 
joining the Hills. Fairview Aztec endlines the Eagle and with less develop- 
ment shows a similar promise of great values to come. Aztec was the most 
recently listed of the Fairview stocks. 

Returning to Goldfield, it would be useless to discuss the strike, because 
present appearances all point to a settlement to be effected before this 
letter can reach the printers. Service on the railroads and the telegraph 
offices is improving. Brilliant writers, such as Rex Beach, author of The 
Spoilers, are in camp and it is fair to presume their reports will more than 
offset the libels circulated by hired hacks of the past month. There is 
relief from the fuel famine. Coal is coming in. At the most acute stage, 
there arrived two carloads of wood from a point in Utah, nine hundred miles 
away. These two carloads were a part of a trainload ordered by the brokerage 
firm of W. F. Bond and Company, who distributed the supply free of cost 
among those in the direst need. Just one instance to prove that in this desert 
camp, where strangers look for naught but gold and six-shooters, there is the 
milk of human kindness and the honey of philanthropy. 



CHLORIDE. 

Goldfield, Nevada, January 17th. — The latest of Nevada's old mining 
districts to plunge suddenly into the limelight of popular favor is Chloride, 
the new, which was Danville, the old. Silver-lead ore in lavish abundance 
and high percentages of mineral content are its claims upon the mining pub- 
lic 's favor. When the size, number and ore-bearing proclivities of its massive 
veins are considered it seems unaccountable that its fame has so long been 
kept in the background; yet in this it but repeats history of such camps 
as Fairview, traversed fifty years ago by California-bound gold seekers who 
in their hurried flight to the mecca of the Forty-niners stumbled unheeding 
over float and croppings which within the last year led to the discovery of 
mines that are now paying dividends, such mines as Nevada Hills, Fairview 
Eagle and Golden Boulder. 

Chloride town is the heart of the Chloride district, which is about twenty- 
five miles square, stretching from Dobbin 's Summit on the north to Clover 
Creek on the south, from the Morey mountains on the east to the crest of the 
Monitor range on the West, facing Fish Springs Valley, Nye County. The lit- 
tle camp, itself, is 75 miles northeast of Tonopah, 45 miles northeast of Man- 
hattan, 65 miles southwest of Eureka, 40 miles northeast of Belmont, 30 miles 
northwest of Tybo, 25 miles northwest of Morey. 

Danville mining district, reorganized as Chloride less than a year ago, 
was originally located in 1867. The old town of Danville is the site of the 
modern Chloride. In her maiden days she mined and shipped hundreds of thou- 
sands of dollars worth of ore, numbering among her productive bonanzas the 
Richmond, Sage Hen, Boston and Rattlesnake mines, whose names were house- 
hold words among prospecting pioneers of the Sagebrush state. Smelters at 
Eureka and Hot Creek treated the output. This was contemporaneous with 
the halcyon days of the Comstojck, when Belmont and Morey and Tybo were 
adding their millions to the steady flow of silver and gold that poured from 
the reserves of Nevada. All these ancient camps, virtually derelicts after 
"the crime of '73," are reviving, taking on new life that promises for them 
such an era of prosperity and production as shall prove a total eclipse of their 
pristine lustre. At Belmont a wealthy corporation of Easterners is planning 
the rejuvenation of the old smelting industry, spurred on by the resumption of 
healthy activity at all contiguous camps. 

Col. S. F. Mount, step-father of Chloride under its new regime, journeyed 
to the. re-born diggings in July, 1905, pinned his faith forthwith to the long 
abandoned domain, there pitched his tent and there has abided ever since, he 
and his associates regularly re-organizing the district in March, 1906. Col. 
Mount is well known among mining operators, especially of Utah, having 
been a conspicuous figure in the early history of Bingham, Eureka, Gold 
, Mountain and Marysvale. He and Lafayette Holbrook owned the 
famous old Ibex mine in Drum district, Millar Count, Utah, selling an interest 
to the late Allan G. Campbell, subsequently transferring to Col. O. P. Posey, at 
present a prominent mining and smelting magnate of Goldfield, and his partner, 
F. L. Underwood, a New York capitalist. The Ibex is now the property of 
Senator Smoot, C. E. Loose, David Evans and Mr. Holbrook. Just now, Col. 
Mount is in Goldfield on business connected with his Chloride holdings and in 
an interview furnished the substance of this letter. Incidentally while here he 
declined a spot-cash offer of $25,000 for the group of Chloride claims owned 
by himself, Lige Harris, of Bullfrog fame; Lige Mount, the Colonel's brother, 
who has mined in the west ever since the close of the Civil War; Clarence 
Robinson, a successful operator of Manhattan and Goldfield and Felix Yowell, 
a practical miner. 

The Northern group, the property of this quintette, Comprises twenty-one 
claims, upon which seven well-defined ledges are receiving development at- 
tention. Upwards of $35,000 worth of work was done upon them by owners of 
away-back and the present management has expended $15,000 in further ex- 
ploitation. It is a lime and porphyry country, the lime trending north and 



PROFESSIONAL, DIRECTORY 



BARLOW & HILL 

MAP MAKERS 



Bakersfield, 



California. 









GEO. 


H. 


BUSH 












ATTORNEY AT LAW 






1300 


Golden 


Gate 


Avenue 




San 


Francisco, 


California 



A. S. COOPER, C. E., M. E. 

GEOLOGIST AND MINERALOGIST 

2621 Hillegras Avenue Berkeley, California 



CRESCENT BLUE PRINT CO. 

MINING MAPS 
Blue Prints and Tracing 

Tel. Franklin 773. 



612 O'Farrell Street 



San Francisco, California 



HENRY C. DEMMING 

MINING ENGINEER 
Geologist Mineralogist and Chemist 
79 wells located without a "duster" 
15-17 North Third Street. 



Harrisburg, Pa. 



CHARLES GREEN 

DRAFTSMAN 

General Drafting and Tracing— BLUE PRINTS— Fine Map Work a 

Specialty. 

Telephone Berkeley 461 

2430 Channing Way Berkeley, California 



WM. P. HUBBARD, 






Attorney at Law 






1300 Golden Gate Avenue, 


San 


L'rancisco. 









CHARLES F. 


HUMPHREY 










Attorney 


at Law 










Suite 32 St. 


Mingo Bldg. 




1300 


Golden 


gate 


Avenue 


San Francisco, 


California. 









J. M. 


NESBIT, Attorney 

PATENTS 








United States and Foreign Trade Marks Registered 


921 


Park 


Building 




Pittsburg, 


Pennsylvania 







SMITH, 


EMERY & CO., 










Chemists and Chemical Engineers 






Bureau 


of Inspection and Tests 








San 


Francisco, 




Oakland Office, 


1068 


Broadway. 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPOKTKU. 



IS 



iib iron porphyry, the ideal silver 
lion. In the Ul am ;i glory 

n ide nod in 

ir bile at other points I i vein width of from o 

two r r tun, silver ami lead. Exploration energy ■ 

fin. 4 ehieflj to the driving ot tunnels nnd crosscuts, though several com 
parativcly shnllow shafts have been sunk, all in ore. 

ts claim en the Northern group, formerly christened the Sage 
Hon, ■ Med a three fool lead of av< iff. Prom the Lookout 

rlaiin. another of the group of twenty one, rich ore in quantity was mai 

timers. There is there ■ great blowout win 

sihor per ton. Another claim is the Kentucky^ where fur- 
returns run to $90 silver and 30 per cent lead. Ten to forty ounces 
silv.-r and - '• from a i>ig iron dyke, contact between lima and por- 

phyry, outcropping on the Iron Savage rlaim. Another iron blowout, found on 
it hern claim is good for as much as 120 ounces silver and the Baal Dip 
need to ship $900 ore when it was first worked as the Are of Spades by the 
earlier operators. The lime and porphyry belt from which bucb values are 
taken on the Northern group is about three-quarters of a mile long, boldly 
tpping all the way and everywhere showing more or less generous val- 
\ total blank anywhere along the grassroots lias never yet been found. 
Grassroots suggests the fact that in this section of desert Nevada, there is 
abundance oi wood and water and a fine grazing range, there being thrifty 
a in the immediate vicinity. 

of the Northern's neighbors, which are being thoroughly pros- 
pected with a view to future production, are the adjoining group of four claims 
ownr»l by Lloyd Mount, Col. Mount's son, the Hillery, the McGilvery and the 
Jackson Rhine group on Green Eyed Monster ('reek, a mile and a halt" south 
of « 'hloride, and the claims of Harry Bedford and others on Silver Creek a 
mile and a half north. On both these creeks the values are gold, silver and 
copper, though the formation is identical in appearance with that of the 
Northern. Within the past few weeks, there lias been a mild stampede to the 
district, which is fast filling up with prospectors, working on their own ac- 
counts or staked by mine-owners who are waking up to the possibilities of 
Chloride, whose nearest post-office is Antelope, Nye County, five miles north 
of the district headquarters, the camp of Chloride on Northern territory . 

One of the most powerful influences making for the renewal of develop- 
ment is the certainty of one and possibly two railroads to be built this year 
to points respectively within eighteen and twenty-five miles of Chloride. One 
of these projected lines is to extend from Battle Mountain and Austin, via 
Smoky Valley and Manhattan to Tonopah, thence to connect with the Santa 
- Fe at Ludlow, by way of Goldfield and Rhyolite, by relations with the Tono- 
pah and Tidewater. Its nearest station to Chloride will be eighteen miles west 
of that camp. Hot Creek, 25 miles southeast of Chloride, is on the route of 
the road to run from Ely. Chloride mines can now play a trifle better even 
by shipping to Eureka, 65 miles, and Tonopah, 75 miles. It is obvious that 
the reduction of the haul to 18 or 25 miles will make a big difference in the 
profits. "With the completion of either or both of these roads, will come the 
Complete rehabilitation and permanent re-establishment of Chloride, the resur- 
rected Danville. 



MANHATTAN. 



Manhattan, Nev., January, 15th. 

That the mining district of Manhattan is to have another custom reduction 
plant in addition to that projected by the Tonopah Exploration Company, is 
now an absolute certainty. Two gentlemen at the head of the enterprise 
are now in Goldfield arranging for ore to be treated when the stamps begin 
to drop. They are Clifford McClellan, a prominent attorney of Manhattan, 
and C. S. Lemon, a noted promoter of Philadelphia and Manhattan. Both 
gentlemen state that they are receiving every encouragement from mine owners 
who are operating properties in the Manhattan district, and that the under- 
taking is far beyond the stage of speculation. 

In the beginning the mill will be equipped with probably not more than 
ten stamps, but according to present expectations the number will soon be 
increased to fifty or sixty. The process will be a combination of concentra- 
tion amalgamation and cyanide. The day the mill is placed in commission, 
there will be available, according to contracts already signed, 15,000 tons of 
Manhattan ore for treatment. This will be supplied by the Union No. 9 and 
other properties of the Dexter company, the Little Grey, Chipmunk and the 
Annie Laurie claim of the Manhattan Mining company. The largest signed 
contract obtained in Goldfield was from the Manhattan Mining company, which 
has agreed to deliver to the mill, as soon as it is ready to handle it. 1000 tons 
of rich milling ore now on the dumps of the Annie Laurie claim. 

Mr. Lemon has achieved many notable successes in the line of large pro- 
motions. One of his most distinguished accomplishments was the launching 
of the Tonopah and Goldfield railroad. He conceived the plan and carried 
it to a point near execution when he turned the proposition over to its pres- 
ent owners. It is interesting to note that in his prospectus upon which he 
floated the deal, Mr. Lemon stated that the earning capacity of this line would 
reach $135,000 per annum, net. It is now a matter of history that the first 



OIL STOCK EXCHANGE 

Oscar Eldridge, Proprietor 

Arroyo Grande, California 

Oil Stocks bought and sold on Commission. Before 
investing call or write lor quotations. 



' 



Contract 

Drilling deep 
wells for 
Oil or 
Water 
Furnish Com- 
plete Plants 
for Drilling \ 
Prices Eeas 
onable 






i 



*■'-'- - 




Box 237 



W. E. YOULE 



Wanted 

Good Second- 
hand Kigs 
Oil Well Tools 
I Oil Well Cas- 
ing and Pipe 
Engines and 
Boilers 
: ( Fishing Tools 

SAN LUIS 
OBISPO, CAL 



PRESNO COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY 

Incorporated under the laws of California, January 21, 1901 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 

FULLY FiVID UP 

SEARCHERS OF RECORDS AND 
CONVEYANCE 



Abstracts of Title carefully compiled at reasonable rates 



No. lll€* k: St. 



Fresno, Ceil. 



King Keystone Oil Co. 

Lubricating Oils and Greases 

Marine Engine Oils, Boiler Compound, Distillates 

Linseed Oil, Paraffine Wax, Vegetable Oil 

Asphaltum, Animal Oil, Fish Oil 



22 Clay Street 



San Francisco, Cal. 



SEATTLE BRANCH : 
Cor. Pike St. and R. R. Ave. 

REFINERY: West Berkeley, Cal. 



16 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER. 



year's net earnings of the Tonopah and Goldfield railroad amounted to $446,000. 
The eight months ending on the 30th day of last June brought net earnings 
of $435,281, while the annual net earnings, estimated from the present opera- 
tions, are now $652,921. 

Another great enterprise which Mr. Lemon is backing is the construction 
of a railroad whose completion will effect a connection between the Southern 
Pacific on the north and the Santa Fe on the south. The Nevada Central line 
will be utilized from Battle Mountain to Austin, and will be extended from 
the latter point to Manhattan via Smoky Valley and then on to Tonopah 
and Goldfield to reach Ludlow on the Santa Fe over the Borax Smith road, 
with which it will connect at Rhyolite. The Nevada Central line is 93 miles 
long. It will require the building of 125 miles of road to connect Austin with 
Tonopah. Thence the route will practically parallel the Clark mid Brock roads 
from Tonopah to Rhyolite, it being understood that on this stretch the Lemon 
line will join issues with the Tonopah and Tidewater, more commonly known 
at the Borax Smith line, which will be used from Rhyolite to the Santa Fe 
station of Ludlow. 

The Annie Laurie claim, owned by the Manhattan Mining company, Man- 
hattan district, again comes to the front with a gold strike of sensational 
proportions. Six feet of ore, tapped at a depth of 120 feet in the main work- 
ing shaft gives a grab-sample assay across its entire width of $128 per ton. 
A streak of 3 to 5 inches near the hanging wall has yielded 3 assays the average 
being $1922 gold per ton. 

The main shaft of the Annie Laurie is sinking beside the vein which it 
has tapped at intervals along its course. At a depth of 50 feet the ledge 
showed average values around $50 per ton. At the 100 level the average was 
better than $100, with a seam for more than $1000 per ton. The latest revela- 
tion on the 120 foot level is a confirmation of the previously demonstrated 
theory that Manhattan values enhance with depth and all Manhattan operators 
conversant with conditions are rejoicing with the management of the Man- 
hattan Mining Company. The Annie Laurie shaft continues sinking for a 
depth of 500 feet. 



JOHNNIE. 

Johnnie, Nevada, January 14, 1907. 

All indications are that Johnnie will make a greater headway during the 
coming year than it has during the one just ended. The last year has shown 
remarkable strides, for when one stops to consider that this time last year, 
such great properties as the Johnnie Wonder, the Globe Johnnie, the Bull- 
frog Johnnie and the Boston Johnnie were practically unknown and the Globe 
Treasure vein which has produced some of the richest ore ever mined in 
this state, truly the progress has been wonderful, but this has been the history 
of the whole state. This move fast on the desert. 

The new shaft of the Johnnie Con. is almost completed and will be equip- 
ped with a new hoist and then will be modern in every particular. All the 
property will require to become one of the big producers of the state will 
be reduction works, and this will also soon be a fact, for in a recent interview, 
Carl F. Schader, the manager of the Johnnie Con. mine, stated that there was 
enough money in the treasury to erect the plant, but that certain development 
would have to be done first. This was accomplished in the upraising of the 
new shaft and now that the upper levels have been cleaned out and the uncer- 
tain ground has been well timbered, the property has lost its deserted ap- 
pearance it has the appearance of "something doing.*' 

The lower tunnel of the Globe Johnnie is swiftly approaching the bonanza 
ground. This work has been going on for some time, but a fault and the 



vagaries of nature have proven the calculations of man a mistake and the work 
took longer than was anticipated. The tunnel is advanced nearly two hundred 
feet and the ore, while the formation is practically the same as when first 
encountered, shows up much richer. The gold comes in larger quantities and 
occasionally "glims" are extracted. 

In addition to the force at work in the upper shaft of the Bullfrog John- 
nie, men have been put to work in the lower shaft. These two shafts are 
connected by a 175 foot tunnel along the ledge. It is the intention of the 
superintendent to sink both shafts another hundred feet and again connect 
them, thus blocking out a large amount of ore. 

The superintendent of the Boston Johnnie Company is confining his at- 
tention to the development work in the leases. The Bowler lease, especially^ 
is showing up well and bids fair to resume its record breaking of last summer. 
Considerable assaying work is being done on the original ground of the 
Boston Johnnie and soon men will be at work in the main working shaft. 



IMPORTANT STRIKE ON WEST EXTENSION. 

A strike of more than ordinary importance has just been made in the West 
Fjxtension, says the Bullfrog Miner. At a depth of 94 feet in the double com- 
partment shaft, recently started on the side hill, 300 feet northwest of the 
original development shaft, some $900 ore has been uncovered. Len P. MeGar- 
ry, general manager of the company, brought in a quantity of the material 
the other day. It is the characteristic green ore of the Original Bullfrog, 
and shows lots of free gold to the naked eye. Besides the rich streak, the 
entire bottom of the shaft will average between $50 and $75. 

Assays from the face of the west drift from the old shaft recently gave 
a return of $648. The recent uncovering made in the new shaft shows a con- 
tinuous ore body of at least 300 feet, high grade material, between the two 
shafts. Besides this on the Ethel claim the tunnel, now in 56 feet, has broken 
into I 1 !' feet of amethyst quartz, invariably accompanies the high grade green 
ore. This, it would seem, gives every reason to believe that the body is con- 
tinuous for this distance. 



RECORD STOCK SALES. 

Following closely upon the settlement of the Goldfield strike, stock sales 
at San Francisco have taken a tremendous boom and record sales have been 
recorded. On Saturday, January 12th, the short da}' on 'change, the average 
for the session was 3333 shares per minute, or more than 200,000 an hour. 
Brokers again find themselves piled up to the ears in business, and there is a 
general scramble for Southern Nevadas on a rapidly raising market. 



Asked. 
.2(1 



CALIFORNIA STOCK & OIL EXCHANGE. 

Following are the latest quotations for stocks of oil companies listed 
on the California Stock & Oil Exchange: 

Bid 

Apollo 

Associated Oil Stock. Tr. Cer 

Associated Bonds 5s 1922 

Caribou 

Chicago Crude (old) 

Chicago Crude (new) 

Forty 

Four 

Home 

Independence 

Junction 

Kern (new) . . - - 

Linda Vista 

McKittrick 

Monarch of Arizona 



ill .1)11 




(i . 2.1 




.35 




.08 


.10 


.58 






.27 


. 25 


.29 


.11 


.in 


.10 




.10 




.10 




.12 





Capitalization 

$1,500,000.00 


Dutchman Creek of Nevada 
Gold Mining Company 


1,500,000 Shares 

Par Value $1 Each 


Treasury Stock 

575,000 Shares 


Fully Paid and 

l\on-Assessable 


incorporated Under the Laws of Arizona 


THE COMPANY ANNOUNCES ITS FIRST OFFERING OF STOCK TO INVESTORS-50,000 SHARES WILL BE SOLD AT 

25c— TWENTY-FIVE CENTS— 25c 

the proceeds of which will be devoted to further development work. Dutchman Creelc of Nevada Gold Mining Co. owns three full claims paid in full and deeded to the company! j 
ocated in the great "Walker Lake Mining District," Nevada, and adjoining the famous old "Dutchman" mine on the west upon which a strike has just been made assaying $1 
pound or 32,000 a ton. Three ledges on our property show assays of $101.21, $30.75, $15.26. WIRE YOUR ORDERS AT ONCE. 


POMEROY SECURITIES COMPANY, Incorporated 

FISCAL AGENTS 
San Francisco Office, 1300 Golden Gate Avenue 



I' \< IF1< MINING & nil, REPORTER. 



17 



.M 



.40 



,40 

SAN FRANCISCO STOCK EXCHANGE. 
the latest quotations of mining Btocka l.ated on the San 
ft Exchange Board: 

ALASKA 
Bid. Ask., I. Bid. Asked 

Wild G -].::• 

CALIFORNIA 



it 



Brunswick 65 

( '. n. Kur. kn 7.~> 

Ex. Mt. Cop 1.40 

Fur i ri-rk 

Kur Creek Exten 

Qreon I". i 'op 



.10 

go 



Green li 



t 5.6 

I I Kx 

Tonop 1 

Brow^h.-r 's 2 

< California 

Boy .... 
Esperanza .... 
ka Tonop. 
in Anchor 
' irown . . . 
' lolden ' (ate . . 
Gold Mountain 
Gold M. i 'cm. . 
tin at Western 

Home 

Indiana Tonop. 



1.45 

."..r.ii 
1.10 



.li) 

.1* 



is 

11' 

(12 

.' 11 

20 

in 

mi 

I).'. 

Hi 

02 

.Mm Butler 1.27 



Jim Butler Exten. 
Little Tonop 

Mac Xalnal'a 

Midway 



.13 



.64 



Green B. Ox 

Moli 

K. an. Won 

Light ner 1 

Nevada Berculi a 

Boy 

.30 Smith Eureka 

NEVADA. 
Tonopah District 
- Midway Exten 

M , :pah Ex 

M ontana 

Mi. n. Mid. Exten 

M. Pitta Ex 

V Y. Ton. Con 

North Star 

< tlii.. Tonop 

( thin Tonop. Ex 

Paymaster 

Bed Rock Ex 

Rescue Con 

T p. Exten 

T. Home ( 'on 

Tonop. Loile 

Tonop: S. and G 

Ton. of Nev 17 

West End 1 

UVst Tonop 

W. T..uop. Ex- 



20 



.11! 

.'.:: 
.mi 
.4:: 
.21 

.07 

.ill 
.06 

.03 

1.3(1 
.14 

3.00 
.65 

2.25 



A. lams . . . 
A loha 
Atlanta 
Bait Gold. 



Goldfield District. 
.24 .25 Goldfield Union . . . 

.14 . . Grandma 

.94 .95 Great Bend 

.01) .. (Ireat Bend Annex 



.24 
.32 
.26 



.50 



.:to 



.38 

.us 



.4(1 
.Hi) 

3. ill) 
.19 
.21 
.14 
.411 
.2(1 
.12 
.03 
.04 
.20 

5.87 
.OH 



11). no 
1.66 



.15 



.20 



1.35 
.30 



MAILED FREE ON REQUEST 

An elaborately illustrated and ably edited resume of the past 
year's developments in the mines and town of Goldfield, to be pub- 
lished under the auspices of the Goldfield Mining Stock Exchange, 
will be sent to any address in the world free of cost. If interested 
in Nevada mines or stocks send us your address. We are members 
of the mining stock exchanges of Goldfield, Reno and San Francisco 
and are the oldest established brokerage house in Goldfield. 

W. F. BOND & CO. 

Goldfield, Nevada 



A STRAIGHT TIP 



The Debenture Surety Company, ;i prominent brokerage house of 
S;ni Francisco, California, says: 

"Tli< one • best buy ' in Bullfrog today is Bullfrog Extension 'at 
market;' listed San Francisco Exchanges; Belling 20 i«i 25 cents, an 
advance of ten cents per share in (lie past fewdays. Joins Original 
Bullfrog mi thr north, easl ami south; four claims paid for; four shafts 

ami i 'I prove ledge Eor over L500 feet in length and over 40 feet 

witlr ami wiih ;i depth of 200 feet, gives an enorifious tonnage of nulling 
ore developed. Complete in list i ny equipment; double shifts of men 
rushing work. Clark's railroad already built amiss property, town- 
site on Bullfrog Extension ground. Competent, trustworthy management 
by San Francisco business men who have made honest, business repu- 
tations. A 200,000-share transaction recently passed through a ioc-al 
bank. The stock is falling into strong hands and will advance soon to 
double presenl price. 



;iml Bondi 

High-gride Securities 
Mines nnd Mining 



telephone WEST 6155 



■ 

—Private 

lint" 



Alfred A. Borlini & Co., Inc. 

Capital, $100,000 

OUR SPECIALTIES 

High-class Investments in Tonopah, Goldfield, 
Bullfrog, Manhattan, and Adjacent Districts 

We handle None But the Best 

OUR AIM 

PROFITS FOR CLIENTS 

NOW OFTERING 

Shares in the Bullfrog Fortuna Mining Company at 
25 cents per share. 

Allotment being rapidly subscribed. 

Write at once for our Booklet "Money Talks." DO NOT 
DELAY. THIS MEANS Y00. 

A. A. BORLINI & CO., Inc. 

Suite 33 Saint Mungo Building, 1 300 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco 



Band 20 

Black Ants 1(5 .17 

B. B. Bonanz 15 .16 

B. B. Exten 17 .18 

Black Rock 12 .13 

Blue Bell 25 .26 

Blue Bull 59 .60 

Blue Quartz 45 

Brooklyn 07 .08 

Butte Goldfield 12 .13 

Booth 1.02 1.05 

('. O. D 1.21) 

Columbia 97 

Columbia Mt 1.15 .1.20 

Columbia Exten 10 .11 

Comb. Fraction 5.50 f».7."> 

Common 34 .35 

Conqueror 29 .30 

Crackerjack 22 .23 

Daisy .'..' 2.72 2.75 

Daisy Annex .21 

Daisy Exten 10 .11 

Dia. B. B. Con 61 .62 

Dixie 16 .18 

Empire 20 

Esmeralda 34 .35 

Exploit 20 

Federal .16 

Fawn 10 

Florence 3.02 4. on 

Florence Exten 27 .30 

Frances M S7 .90 

Frisco 15 

Goldfield Bar Gold 1.25 

Goldfield Bar Frac 20 

Gold Dust 01 

Goldfield Bulldog is 

Goldfield Con 9.12 9.25 

Goldfield Com 35 

Goldfield Fairvw 12 

Goldfield Fissure 06 .07 

Goldfield G. B. Ex 2* .30 

Gol Ifield Herald 05 .07 

Goldfield of Nev 1.75 

Goldfield Me.la 11 

Goldfield N. Star 25 

Goldfield Portland 34 .36 

Goldfield Flat 20' 

Goldfield Lucky Strike .. .14 .15 

Golilfiel.l Kewanos 1.60 1.65 



Great Bend Exten 41) .41 

Hibernia 22 .24 

Highland 10 

Jumbo 4.50 

Jumbo Exten 1.85 1.87 

KendalJ 04 

Kendall Exten 07 .08 

Kewaii.-i Ex. 47 

La;;una 1.65 

Lone Star 40 .41 

Lou Dillon 26 .27 

Lucky Bovs .15 

Lucky Swede 10 

Mnyne 19 .20 

May Queen 32 .33 

May Queen Ex 1) .15 

Mid. Pawnee 12 

Milltown 49 .."in 

11. .hawk 18.00 

Mohawk Jr 08 

Mohawk Exten 24 .25 

Moose Gi.lilt'ii'bl .16 

Nev. Boy '-'4 .25 

Nev. Goldfield 70 .75 

Nev. Western ,06 

Nev. Gt. Bend 12 

Oro 52 

Palace Goldfield 16 

Panyan 10 .11 

Pennsylvania 05 .06 

Potlateh 90 .95 

Red Hills 34 .35 

Red Lion 16 .17 

Bed Top 4.50 

Ked Top Exten 38 .39 

S 1st. .rni .72 ..4 

Sandstorm Exten .10 .11 

Silver Pick 1.50 L.52 

Silver Pick Ex Is .20 

Simmerone .38 

Spear Goldfield 1.20 1.50 

Spear Frac 33 

St. Iv.'s 91 

Sun Dog "4 

Sunnysi.le .16 

Treason- 17 

V.i.l. • 04 .05 

Vernal 25 

W i. i "7 

Yellow R..S.- 14 .15 



18 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER. 



Goldfield Band 

Goldfield 3rd Chance 



Yellow Tiger 



.05 

.26 .27 
Bullfrog District 



11 



59 



05 



Alliance 

Amargosa 

Amethyst 

Baltimore 

Big Bullfrog 

Black Spar 14 

Bon. Mt. Gold 

Bonnie Clare 

Bullfrog Aunex 05 

Bullfrog Banner 1.00 

Bullfrog Com 

Bullfrog Con 

Bullfrog Daisy 44 

Bullfrog Exten 18 

Bullfrog G. King 40 

Bullfrog Gold Beef 15 

Bullfrog Jumper 

Bullfrog Midas 

Bullfrog of Nev 40 

Bullfrog Nt. Bank 55 

Bullfrog N. Star 14 

Bullfrog Sunset 17 

Bullfrog Victor 33 

China Nev 11 

Croesus 

Den. Bullfrog An 

Den. R. Ex 12 

Dia. Bullfrog 10 

Gold Bar 1.47 

Gold Anchor 10 

Gold Annex 

Gold Exten 11 

Gold S. Exten 12 

Gold Dollar 10 

Goldfield Bullfrog 

Goldfield Scepter 

Goldfield M. Gld 

Happy Hool 



56 



.15 
.08 
.60 
.04 
.07 
.15 
.20 
.35 
.06 
1.10 
.12 
.05 



.10 

.70 
.41 
.57 

.IS 
.35 
.15 
.22 
.29 



1.52 

.40 

.15 

.07 
.60 
.09 
.13 



Homestake Con 1.20 

Homestake Exten. 

Lige Harris 06 

Little Bullfrog 04 

Little George 

Mayflower An 

Mayflower Consol :65 

Mayflower Exten 

Maryland 03 

Midnight 

Montana Bullfrog 15 

Montgy. Hill 08 

Montgy. Mt 46 

Mon. Sho. Ex 22 

New Orl 09 

Nugget 12 

North Sho 

Ohio Bullfrog ... 

Orig. Bullfrog 21 

Orig. G .B. Ex 

Penn. Bullfrog 

Piute 

Bhy. Twnsite 

San Pran 

Shoshone 

Sho. Bullfrog Gld. . . . 

Sho. Nat. Bank 

Skook. Bullfrog ..... 

Steinway 

Tramp Con. . . 1.75 

Trinidad 

Valley View 27 

Velvet 10 

Ventura 

Wolverine 

Yankee Boy 14 



.10 
.10 



.15 



21 



Yankee Girl 



.15 



Manhattan District. 



Apr. Pool Ex 04 

Atlan. & Pae 07 

Bulldog 03 

Comet 03 

Doub. Eagle 

Gold Wedge 18 

Granny 

Hindocraft 21 

Indian Camp 

Jump Jack 30 

Little Grey 50 

Man. Atlas 

Man. Belmont 04 

Man. Belle 08 

Man. B. 1 our 15 

Man. Broncho 19 

Man. Buffalo 09 

Man. Carson ' 

Man. Central 

Man. Con 96 

Man. Exten 20 

Man. Com 14 

Man. Cres 

Man. Cowboy 10 

Man. Diamondfield 

Man. Dexter 79 

Man. Prisco 26 

Man. G. Gate 20 

Man. G. Nugget 09 

Man. H. Grade 16 

Man. Ivanhoe 25 

Man. Humboldt 08 

Man. Little Joe 06 

Alice Won 

Arcadia 

Centen. Gld 

Congress 

Cyrus Noble 

Clifford 

Dia. Triangle 73 

E. Gibraltar 

Eagles Nest 26 

Edina Gold 

Pair S. King 50 

Pair Eagle 

Pair B. Mt 17 

Plor. Leasing 15 

Gld. S, Peak 

Gld. Terra 07 

Gld. Beef 14 

Ida Mines 16 

Ida Mae An 05 

Interstate 

Jackpot 1.50 

John Con 18 



.05 
.08 
.05 
.04 
.10 
.19 
.26 

1.00 

.59 
.13 
.05 
.12 

.20 
.10 
.10 
.05 
.98 
.22 
.15 
.16 
.12 
.07 
.80 
.28 



.17 



Man. Jumbo 05 

Man. of Nev 18 

Man. Mammoth 22 

Man. Mayflower 50 

Man. Mohawk 

Man. Mon. Ex 05 

Man. Monitor 06 

Man. Navajo 

Man. Oriental 14 

Man. Oreana 

Man. B. Top 05 

Man. Stand 05 

Man. Syn 

Man. United 15 

Man. Verde 05 

Man. Vir 

Man. Wolftone 25 

Mineral Hill 

Mustang Mn 22 

Mustang Annex 04 

Mustang Exten 17 

Nemo Man 25 

Orig. Man 31 

Pinenut 28 

Balston 

Bocky Hill 16 

S. Humphrey 13 

Stray Dog 50 

Taquima Cop 12 

Thanksgiv 10 



Whale 

. . Yellow Horse 

.07 Yellow Horse Exten. 
Other Districts. 

.24 K. Keystone 

.10 Kaw. of Nev 

.65 Lee Bonanza 

.10 Lida Bell 

.20 Nev. Hills 

.03 do. Extension 53 

.75 Nevada Hill Plor 

.50 Nevada Sunshine 

.27 Nevada Gold Dev. 
.50 N. S. Wonder .... 

. . Palmetto 

1.00 Pitts S. Peak .... 

. . Pyramid 

.25 Bamsey 

.20 Bed Wing 

.08 Boe. Hmstk 

. . Bound Mt 

. . do. Alpine 25 

do. Extension . 33 

.05 Buby Wonder 31 

1.75 S. P. Mayflow 

. . Sylvania 15 



.11 
.10 
.19 

.20 
.01 

.08 
3.60 



.05 
.28 

1.75 

/iO 

.31 



.18 



.21 
.07 
.05 
.05 
.22 
.66 
.20 

ii 

.16 



.23 
.10 
.13 
.19 
.30 
.22 
.10 
.11 



.07 
.09 
.22 
.36 
1.80 
.50 
.28 

.50 

.08 

.16 



.06 
.19 



.14 
.15 
.24 
.10 

.07 



.07 

.30 
.24 
.05 
.18 

.32 
.29 

.14 

ii 

.51 
.14 

.13 
.11 
.20 



.20 



.20 
50 

.29 

.34 

1.80 

.23 

.32 

1.00 

.05 



.40 



City Livery Stable 

Hauling of Every Description Done 

A full line of Hardwood Lumber. 
Blacksmithing Done at Standard Prices. 
A full line of Single and Double Rigs. 

Cheney Brothers Coalinga, Cal. 

Coalinga 
Lliveipy and peed Stables 

LOUIS MERRILL, Prop. 

DEALER IN HAY AND GRAIN 
FIRST CLASS TURNOUTS 

Single and Double 
AGENTS FOR STUDEBAKER VEHICLES AND WAGONS 

Coalinga California 



A. P. ffiAY 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

[WHOLESALE AND RETAIL] 

most Reliable and Complete Stoek.of eamp 

supplies and oil men's furnishings 

in Coalinga 

"^7"ells E^a-zgro cSc Company 
COALINGA, CALIFORNIA 



Wm. Wallace 



B. W. Charlesworth 



WALLACE & CHARLESWORTH 




PLUMBERS, TINNERS and 

Galvanized Tank Builders 

Everything in Plumbing, Tin and 
Sheet Iron Work 

Estimate furnished on all kinds 

of work 

Oil Tanks, Bath Tubs, Sinks, 

Wagon Tanks, Toilets, Pumps, 

Water Barrels, Lavatories, 

Wind Mills 



P&B 

Coalinga, Cal. 



Agent of 
ROOFINCi PAINTS 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



Vol. VIII. No. 7 



San Francisco, Cal., February 5, 1907 



Price, 10 Cents 



DUTCHMAN CREEK. 

History of a Eich Mining District in the Old Walker Indian Reservation. 

With tin- great production of the Southern Nevada mines during the 
year just passed the "Silver State" is regarded by people qo1 versed in its 
history, as ■ new country, and yel it was forty-two years ago (1865) when 
;tn old German prospector named Sennits, while prospecting in the hunting 
grounds of the "Piute* 1 on the weal si.!.- of Walker Lake, found an outcrop- 
ping ledge of rich gold ore. Be dug as only the poor prospector can, and 
found, :is depth was reached, that tin- ledge grew wider and richer with 
every foot. To him it was like a dream, but, in reality, it was his, all his. 
and the thought came to him of untold riches and a return to the Fatherland. 
It was his secret, nobody should know of it. and yet, in a short time, he 
wondered how he could alone cope with the obstacles nature had placid in 
those rugged Nevada mountains. Me thought it better to keep tlie secret 
within his own family than to lei outsiders into it, so he sent for his two 
nephews in Germany — he could trust those of his own blood and would share 
with them greater riches than be had ever dreamed of. 

After due time the two Schnitz boys arrived at their new home. A crude 

d by their uncle, about one-half mile from the shore of 

Walker Lake, on a beautiful Hat that slopes gently toward it. and which 

ever sheltered by the hills on three sides. With the limited knowledge 
of mining possessed only by the uncle and with their primitive tools, the three 
went to work, the two boys digging and breaking away the ledge and the 
elder Sclmitz operating the wheel and flume reducing the roek to the sought- 
for prize — gold. Many trips were made by them to Hawthorne, which, at 
the present lime, is still a busy town, the county seat of Esmeralda County, 
and which has been cut off from the railroad seven miles on account of the 
rebuilding of the same from a narrow gauge to standard gauge track. It 
was, perhaps, more flourishing in those days than now, but there it was 
that they carried their coveted treasure and exchanged it for supplies and 
money. 

Schnitz became known in Hawthorne as the "Old Dutchman," and it 
was also known that he had a secret mine, rich in gold. Naturally, he was 
cunning, and his secret was kept by himself and the two boys, for a time. 
N'o doubt it was the "Nevada American" the Piute Indians followed and 
discovered Schnitz 's mine, and then, again, it may have been that the old 
man and his nephews had become less careful, and possibly, they were grad- 



ually losing respect for the intellectual and courag s Piutes, who were 

watching theil every move. History knows nothing of how they were 
found out, but it does know that one might in the early spring of IS(>7. a£l i] 
all three had "turned in,'' and sought the comfort of their little Cabin, after 
the days toil, a band of the Piutes surrounded the little cabin and its in 
mates and called them out. Once out of their home they found themselves 
confronted with levelled and cocked guns for their greeting. The Indians 
told the old man that his lease of life was about up, and they had come to 
kill him and the two boys. Schnitz pleaded for their lives, but the Piutes, 
true to the nature of their tribe, were obstinate and said nothing but their 
lives would do. At last a bargain was reached which shows the character of 
this kind, unselfish German and of many a prospector who lias experienced the 
many bitter struggles and hardships of life in his quest for gold. 

Schnitz offered to pay them $500 in gold if they would allow the boys to 
go away in peace, death being agreeable to himself under the circumstances. 
This offer was accepted, the money was counted out, the payment made and 
immediately upon the consummation of this part of the deal the old pros- 
pector was shot down in the presence of his nephews. The boys were then 
ordered to leave, which they did, by going down to the lake and embarking 
in their canoe. The boys had not paddled far from the shore when they were 
filled with bullets from the rifles of the treacherous Indians. The canoe over 
turning, their bodies were lost in the clear waters of Walker Lake. 

Soon after these murders, the Indians worked the mine in their lazy, un- 
intelligent way for a few months, doing practically nothing in the way of 
development. Later on, in the same year, Colonel Hart, of Marcus Daly fame, 
visited the reservation, made a treaty with the Indians whereby the mine 
could be operated on a large scale. He returned to San Francisco, where 
he placed an order for an immense "Arasta" and water wheel, the lafgesl 
ever constructed, the sections of which were shipped at a very great ex- 
pense to "Dutchman Creek," and erected in front of the cabin built by 
Schnitz, and new operations, under Colonel Hart, were immediately begun. 

From this mine Hart expected to realize great wealth, but he had not 
calculated upon the treachery of the "Piutes" and other obstacles which 
blocked his way. The attacks so frequently practiced by the Indians were so 
annoying that he ceased operations altogether, at a loss of about $70,000. 

For a number of years thereafter the "Old Dutchman" mine remained 
idle, and no one ever appeared who had the grit and hardihood to ever at- 
tempt to work under the difficulties occasioned by Indian interference. 

During August, 1906, Major Falkeuberg and a party of friends, knowing 




OLD "ARASTA" AT DUTCHMAN CREEK MINE 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER. 



that the reservation would be opened to the public, decided to cross the 
boundary line and investigate the mineral merits of the "Dutchman Creek" 
district. They had been prospecting around Mt. Grant, to the west of the 
reservation, and near the boundary line, and started mule-back across the 
mountain pass over steep and dangerous trails. One thing the members of 
the party were to look for sharply was the Indian police, for to meet them 
would have meant to be turned back. During the night they did not dare to 
light the customary camp fires on account of the vigilance maintained by the 
mounted Indian police. Through the pass the journey was made on foot to 
inspect the "Old Dutchman" mine on Dutchman Greek, and they finally 
reached the mine. It looked good to them, for the opening of the reservation 
was to be on October 29th. On the -7th day of October they could have 
been seen at Wheeler Pass Springs, carrying four days' supplies and ready for 
the "rush. ' ' 

The party again passed over the Mt. Grant trial, and mi Sunday, October 
28th, the day before the opening of the reservation, they reconnoitred prac- 
tically on the very edge of the "Old Dutchman" mine. The Indian police 
seemed to be watching everywhere; but Major Palkenberg, himself an old In- 
dian fighter, managed to keep out # of their sight at all times. Crawling on 
their hands and knees and oftentimes wriggling on their stomachs, slow 
progress was made. In the clear moonlight of the nigh! that followed they 
did not sleep, but watched. They saw several Indian police ride up, dismount 
and enter the cabin, probably looking for " sooners. Coining out of the 

door, they locked it carefully after them, and inspected the surrounding land 
closely. 

The very frequent crossing and recrossing of the creek, which is un- 
natural for police, be they white, black or red, made the Major suspicious 



that they were not police at all, but that they were employed by "sooners" to 
act as such, and to bluff any one who might come in before the signal was 
tired for the opening. The morning of the 29th had come and nothing could 
be done but to await the signal which gave all liberty to cross the line. 

The story of the Dutchman had not been told for 40 years for noth- 
ing, and the ground seemed covered with determined men ready to take 
their chance for the old "Dutchman" mine. It seemed that behind every 
other bunch of sagebrush there Was a white man's head, prospectors who 
had rushed in before the noon hour and erected monuments; but these were 
all knocked down by the police and their notices destroyed. 

Falkenberg and his party waited. They had their plan of action, and it 
was perfect. At about one minute to twelve he came out from under cover 
of the brush and went to the mouth of the old tunnel and stood there with 
cocked revolvers in his hand on the two Indians he found coming out of 
the tunnel at this point. Stansbury and Campbell beat Falkenberg 's partners 
to the old Dutchman, put up their monuments and notices, and the MajoT 
lost the sought-for prize. Several locations were claimed on the property, but 
it is now settled that Stansbury and Campbell are the original locators. 

It has been reported that many rich strikes have been made on several 
properties on the creek, ore to the value of $2,000 per ton being taken out of 
the "Dutchman." The Dutchman Creek of Nevada Gold Mining Company 
has three claims adjoining the "Dutchman" mine, and it is said to be a very 
valuable property, ore averaging $200 to the ton being taken from one of 
their claims. 

Dutchman Creek is the name of the new camp for this district which can 
boast of about 150 houses and as many tents, 1,000 inhabitants and a weekly 
newspaper. 





352 ' %*>■• ii«£ -".'-* *■'<*£' - * ±. V *■• " ' w»wi . w«,_.- ---JX-. 



W g W^frpyj afci 




THE TANK CAR SHORTAGE. 



From evidence gathered over a period of years ami from the testimony 
submitted before the United States Commissioner of Corporations last year, 
1906, it would seem that in California a form of railroad discrimination exists 
other than that of rate discrimination, i. e., discrimination in the supply of 
equipment. While this form is general in its nature, applying more or less 
to all industries in the State of California, there is convincing evidence that 
it is principally aimed at the oil industry, which has suffered in an almost 
incalculable degree thereby. Indeed, it is this equipment discrimination that 
is at the bottom of the grievances of the independent oil producer and of 
the apparent advantages of the powerful monopolies which now control seven- 
tenths of I lie available oil output of the .State of California. The unfair ap- 
portionment of tank ears is on the lips of nearly every independent producer, 
ami the complaint is well grounded and fully corroborated. 

The more important groups of oil districts of this State are four in num- 
ber, as follows: 

Kern County, embracing the Kern River, Sunset. Midway and McKit- 
triek fields. 

The Coalinga Held. 

The Santa Maria Geld, including the Lornpoc Anticline. 

The Southern fields, embracing the Los Angeles City Held. Salt Lake field. 
Pullerton and Brea Canyon field, Puente and Whittier, Xewlnll, Ventura, and 
several adj nt small districts. 

Of these four districts Kern County and Coalinga. by reason of their 
geological position, are the ones principally effected by the equipment dis- 
crimination. They lie in the San Joaquin Valley more than one hundred 
miles from tidewater, from which they are separated by a range of moun- 
tains over which oil pipe lines can be laid only at an expense so great as 

to lie beyond the reach of any of the independent prod re. Santa Maria 

and the southern fields, on account of their close proximity to tidewater and to 
a ready market, are less effected, but suffer in a measure inasmuch as they are 
limited to such means of transportation as are independent of the railroad 
companies. It will, therefore, be readily seen that the independent producers 



GENERAL VIEW OF DUTCHMAN CREEK CAMP 

of the Kern County and the Coalinga (Fresno County) fields, are entirely at 
the mercy of the railroad companies, or, more strictly speaking, at the mercy 
of the pipe line companies, to which they are compelled to sell at ruinous 
prices, inasmuch as they are not enabled to transport their product to 
a market. 

For several years prior to the development of the oil fields of the San 
Joaquin Valley (Kern River, Sunset, Midway. McKittriek and Coalinga), cars 
of the Union Tank Line had been in genera! use on the Southern Paeifie 
Raiiroad and had been open to all shippers. The Union Tank Line is owned 
and controlled by the Standard Oil Company. The cars of this line had 
been operated up to 1901 by the Southern Pacific Company under a revocable 
hase, which lease was revoked, the ears being withdrawn from general use, 
their use being enjoyed exclusively by the Standard Oil Company. 

To better illustrate the disastrous consequences and to take advantage 
of an indisputable authority, I shall quote verbatim from the report of the 
United States Commissioner of Corporations, 1906, page 465, as follows: 

"1. For some time prior to 1901, about 325 cars of the Union Tank Line 
Company had been under lease to the Southern Pacific Company, and avail- 
able for the use of shippers generally; then' had been no suggestion to such 
producers that these cars would not remain in such service indefinitely. 



in the summer of 1901 these Union Tank Line cars were withdrawn 
from general commission by the Standard Oil Company and about, two-thirds 
of them sent east. The Standard Oil Company at the same time arranged to 
operate a number of its cars over the lines of the Southern Pacific Company, 
to be used exclusively in the business of the Standard Oil Company. 

"3. This withdrawal of Union Tank Line cars was practically co-incident 
with the purchase of a controlling interest in the Pacific Coast Oil Company by 
the Standard Oil interests, and practically co-incident witli the entrance of 
the Standard Oil Company into the refining and fuel oil business in California, 
it had previously confined its operations chiefly to the sale of refined oil 
shipped from the east or purchased from local refiners. 

"4. The Southern Pacific Company did not have tank ear equipment to 
replace these Union Tank Line cars so withdrawn, and did not provide facili- 
ties adequate for the needs of miscellaneous shippers for a long time. 

"5. Independent producers were thus deprived of a sufficient means of 
reaching markets. 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL KEPORTKK. 



1 

I tliu* i'i depress the 
--II their ■■ 

I 
i.-li producers should ■ quip- 

ooditton, inri< pemh ui 

tui down their « ells when > 

■r in ..in' or two 
which hail cars or had power to obtain them from 
ilea would, of course, \»- on terms advantageous to thi- 
ll will be •"'••n thai the Standard Oil Company, b\ means of its owner- 
i a private tank car line, exercised the privilege ol I • exclusive use 
i time when there was an urgenl demand for cars coincident 
with the development of the San Joaquin Valley B may readily 

...| why other companies did aot pure ha ' pul 

■ 'II an equal footing. The following will ain the 

— ihiliiv of such an action, which would have been accepted by all as 
solution of the question of ear short; i we quote from 

the report of the Commissioner of 

•■It appears from previous discussions that thi policy of the Southern Paci 
in pan y was. to a considerable extent, forced by the Standard Oil Company, 
Nevertheless, the Southern Pacific Company was evidently at fault in ool 
providing additional facilities for the use ol its patrons, and il was i pecialh 
at fault in giving more favorable treatment to the tank cars of the I oiou 
Tank Line Company than to those of independent lank ear owners. The dis- 
crimination is particularly shown in the refusal on tin pari of the Southern 
Pacific Company to haul the cars of independent private lank car owners sub 
to their exclusive use as it hauled the cars of the Union Tank Line 
* 'ompany. 

"An instance of bucIi refusal is found in the expern oce of the Union Oil 
Company. On December 27, 1900, the Union Oil Company informed the South- 
ern Pacific thai it had recently secured several contracts, amounting in all to 

- ething tike 300,000 barrels, ami asked the railroad company to make 

known its policy in regard to furnishing sufficient tank ears. The Union Oil 
Company, in a letter of the above date to an official of the Southern Pacific 
< 'ompany, said: 

•* 'This company has owned for several years 35 to 60 'auk ears The 

handling of these ears is provided for in an agreemenl of .May Ith. 1897, with 

your Mr. Fillmore. The contracts end with the new year. It is absolutely 

;i ry ihai we receive the informal ion we ask. Will be glad to make an 

intment with you at an early date to discuss the matter more fully.' 

"On .January 16th, 1901, the railroad company replied that it had ordered 
inn new cars. The Union Oil Company replied thai this did aol give the neces- 
sary assurance that sufficient cars would be furnished, and also stated that the 
company contemplated purchasing additional cars and asked for a proposi- 
tion for hauling them. On la mm ry ;i 1st an official of the railroad company 
replied to the Union (til Company as follows: 

"'We have taken every means at our command to provide ourselves with 
aev equipmenl and to lease equipment. We do not make any proposition for 
hauling your cars, as we do nol care about encouraging the building of private 
equipment. It' this equipment slum hi be purchased and we should, get a 
greater number of ears hereafter we should certainly insist on using our cars. 
to dm exclusion of private freight cars.' " 

Another sinking illustration of the gross discrimination in the matter 
of handling private equipment is that of the Wan Joaquin Oil and Develop- 
ment ('ompany of the Kern River field. The management believing that a 
solution of the ear problem was in private ownership, and who met with sore 
disappointment, has the following to say (Commissioner's report, page 471): 

"I was led to purchase tank cars for the simple reason that we could not 
get equipmenl to transport our oil. In 1900, when I found out how the trans- 
portation situation was going, I got on a train and went east to buy ears. I 
was told not to buy them; that if \ did 1 would lose money; thai the railroad 
••ompany would not haul them. But it was too late then, as the money was 
paid and the construction of the ears commenced. 1 sent out thirty-four ears. 
They got as far as Los Angel e8 before the Southern Pacific knew they were 
on their lines. Then I was ordered to take them off the lines or they would 
kick them off the rails, I told them to do so at their peril and demanded that 
i hey send the cars to their destination at Bakcrsfield, Fillmore scut the cars 
on, and after they arrived lie asked me to meet him, saying the Southern 
Pacific wanted to operate the cars; bul in the meantime 1 had made a con- 
tract to lease the thirty-four cars to the Santa Pe, After that I got the 
remainder of the cars, sixteen in number, which the Southern Pacific refused 
to ship from Chicago. The cars went to the terminal railroad tracks at Chi- 
cago ready for shipment to the Southern Pacific. I wired my agent to chang< 
his billing to Santa Pe. We got them out here, and then the Southern Pacific 
agreed to give me six-tenths of a cent a mile for my cars to be used in my 
trade only. Prior to this time, however. the\ had offered me 50 cents a day 
hiiI\ and wanted to use them for anybody's business. Later I ordered forty 
cars more, and after taking up the matter with Mr. Stubbs of the Southern 
Pacific, I finally go1 permission to put them on; but their ears were to be given 
preference in loading and unloading. I do not know whether the railroad com- 
pany delayed these cars del i berat ely , Put I have known instances where cars 
were kepi on a siding for six weeks. * ' 

The Commissioner's report is replete with illustrations of this nature 
covering a period of several years, all showing a general tendency on the 
part of the Southern Pacific Company to discourage the building of private 

tank ear lines; at the same time handling the tank cars of the Union Tank 

Line Company in greal numbers with ' , "' result thai bj the time the rail- 



road company had provided itself with a greater number ot cars the mis 
chief had been done ami the Standard <>il Company and a few i 

interests had become such a pow.-r that I their trade was 

sufficient to cause the railroad company to further discriminate in 

i'\ refusing to supply cars to the independents in number adequate to their 

requirements. Asa natural resull tra bj independents are n 

edly nullified because deliveries cannot be made. These contracts eventually 
fall into the hands <>f the Standard Oil Company or ■ I the other 

larger marketing companies, which. I.\ mean d ,1 ii i ininatioD, are 

enabled at all times to secure an adequate number of ears For all require 
ments. 

The matte] of d iscri in i na t ion in the distribution ol tanh cars has bee ■ 

a si.M-k in trade with the large marketing companies, The Standard Oil Com- 
pany, in soliciting contracts, advises that it is the onlj pi n a posi 

lion to make regular guaranteed deliveries. An independent producer in 
soliciting a contract is at once asked if he can guarantee delivery, and when 
he replies that he cannot, negotiations stop right there. No independent pro- 
ducer in the state of California can safely guarantee He' delivery of a single 

carload of oil ler the present deplorable conditions. And such a condition 

is not now due to lack of an adequate number of ears for all. There is ample 
evidence that hundreds of cars have been kept constantly idle on sidings when 
the independent producers have been unalde to secure a single car Ind there 
is also equally convincing evidence that loaded ears have been sidetracked 
indefinitely, while the consumer of independent oil has even been compelled 
to shut down his plant for lack of fuel. We will again repeat from the 
Commissioner's report the testimony of several producers and consumers as 
follows. (Report of Commissioner of Corporations, page 177): 

"An oil refiner said in part: 'I know thai 40 to tilt cars were being 
held for ten days loaded with oil in the Oakland yards when all the oil men 
were crying for ears. These ears had on them, in big letters, "Hold." They 
were the Southern Pacific Company's own ears. 1 

"A producer in the Kern River field testified as follows: 'For two years 
the Southern Pacific Company had an adequate number of curs winch ir could 
have distributed to shippers, but they have not been supplied in sufficient 
numbers and with sufficient regularity to enable producers to comply with 
their contracts. In the summer of I904 I s-v. a hundred empty ears in the 
Kern yard, wlmn neither I nor any other independent shipper could secure a 
car. I believe the Southern Pacific lias deliberately refused to furnish cars to 
independent shippers, its object being to hold the oil in the field for its own 
consumption. ' 

"A producer in the Coaiinga field stated: 'In the first shortage I think 
there was really a lack of cars, but later there would have been plenty of cars 
if equipment had been properly handled. About two and one-half years ago, 
or probably later, I remember there were two sidetracks filled with cars. The 
Southern Pacific Company, in my opinion, have had cars and held them back. 
I think the Santa Fe tried harder than the Southern Pacific to help the shippei 
of oil. ' 

"The superintendent of one of the largest companies in the Kern River 
field said: 'I have seen a long string of empty ears on the gravel switch al 
a time when producers at Oil City were calling for ear-S Oil City is Mir 
Southern Pacific station in the Kern River field.; The Southern Pacific claimed 
to be short of motive power; but Wi producers suspected thai they were trying 
to break the price in the interest of the Standard Oil Company and them- 
selves. The car shortage undoubtedly prevented producers from securing con- 
tracts, as they were then nimble to guarantee deliveries. ' 

"A representative of the Continental Oil Company of the Kern River 
field said: 'Our company had a contract in HUM to deliver oil for ten years 
at 90c a barrel to the United Oil Producers of San Francisco, guaranteeing 
deliveries. The contract remained in force only a month because we con Id 
not get. the ears. The company could only get four or five cars a month in- 
steStd of four or five a day; we could have sold tin whole product if we could 
have had ears. I have seen whole sidetracks in Bakersfield full of cars when 
we could not get any. They were lined up there at the Standard's tanks — 
they may have been the Standard's own cars. \fter this experi ice we did 
not dispose of our oil. We started as soon as we had facilities and then shut 
down. In September, 1903, we made a contract with a bed sugar com 
pany. subject to our ability to gel cars, at a price of 22^c, Later we leased 
our property. ' 

"A large consumer of fuel oil said: "At a time when we were short of 
ears I counted 37 empty cars in the Southern Pacific vards. I think they were 
Southern Pacific ears; at least most of them were. r don't remember whether 
there were any Union Tank Line ears. I told my partner about it and he 
went down and asked the Southern Pacific why they didn't send those empties. 
And they couldn't answer his question.' 

As a specific case of the loss of contracts by independent producers, we 
give the failure of the Dabney Oil 'Company as ;m illustration, Thai company 
had, in the early days of the oil industry of California, enjoyed a good price 
for its oil on several very attractive contracts. As much as 72c a barrel was 
received, while all of the contracts were at a price above 50e a barrel. These 
contracts were with the following firms, and collectively called for about 12,000 
barrels a month: 

Santa Rosa Pumping Plant. 

Grace Profilers Brewery, Santa B 

White Star Laundry, Santa Rosa. 

Leslie Salt Refining ("'ompany, San Mateo. 

E. W. McLeUan, BurHngame. 

Northern California Power Company, Redding and Red Bluff. 

This company lost all of the contracts with the above firms on account 




6 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL EEPOETBR. 



of its inability to secure ears. It later was compelled to sell at 15c a barrel. 
At this price the property was not a paying oue and it has now declined to a 
point where it can never be put on a paying basis with oil at any price. Its 
wells have not been taken care of and have gone mostly to water. 

The Commissioner's report adds: 

"The withdrawal of the Union Tank Line ears at a time when an addi- 
tional supply was imperatively demanded to care for the demands of the 
trade, had a demoralizing effect upon the oil industry, and in connection with 
the failure of the railroads to provide cars, forced numerous producers to 
abandon contracts to the Standard Oil Company and the Associated Oil Com- 
pany. The railroads, it is true, may be held in part responsible for these 
consequences, since it is apjiarent that the Southern Pacific Company, at 
least, did not provide a sufficient number of cars. The attitude of the 
Standard Oil Company is that the Union Tank Line cars withdrawn were 
needed for its own business; but the fact that a large number of these cars 
were taken from California at a time when the oil business in the State was 
expanding so rapidly, and the further fact that this withdrawal occurred 
just about the time that the Standard Oil Company commenced extensive 
purchases of crude oil in California, certainly point very strongly to the con- 
clusion that a desire to depress the price of oil was a consideration in the 
policy of the Standard Oil Company in this matter. 

"A further contention of the independent producers is that the railroads 
of California are aiming to control the principal fuel oil fields of the State 
in order to insure to themselves a supply of cheap fuel for a long time to 
come. In 1904 California railroads consumed about 7,500,000 barrels of oil for 
fuel. A saving of only 10c a barrel on this amount would be equivalent to 
$750,000, which would pay the interest on the dividends at 4 per cent on 
$18,750,000 of securities. The enormous value of a cheap fuel supply to a 
railroad, however, is so obvious as not to require illustration. The theory of 
independent producers that California railroads are endeavoring to secure 
control of those oil fields which produce the most desirable grades of fuel oil 
finds much color in extensive purchases of oil lands by the Santa Pe system 
and in acquisition of oil-producing property by the Associated Oil Company, 
the stock of which is largely owned by the Southern Pacific Company. ' ' 

You will note that I have quoted quite extensively from the report of the 
Commissioner of Corporations. I have done this inasmuch as it is the only 
authentic record of the gross discrepancies of the railroads yet published. "Vol- 
umes of testimony is at hand, the tank car discrimination being on the 
tongue of every independent producer who has ever had a thought of market- 
ing his production. That this discrimination has had the effect of curtailing 
the production of oil from the State of California to at least 50 per cent of 
its possible production is a foregone conclusion well borne out by authentic 
statistics. That it will be still further curtailed, unless some relief is given 
to shippers, there is not a question of doubt. If the ruinous practices of the 
railroads and the Standard Oil Company are allowed to continue another two 
years, all that will be left to mark the site of many a producing oil camp 
will be a mouldering pile of ruins. The railroads will have gathered for their 
own use the cream of the production of the State, insuring a cheap and almost 
inexhaustible fuel supply for many years. 

The present output of the oil fields of the San Joaquin Valley (Kern 
River, Sunset, Midway, McKittrick and Coalinga) is approximately 45,000 
barrels daily. In addition to this there is a possible production of at least 
30,000 barrels daily for which no shipping facilities can be obtained. This 
30,000 barrels daily, or about 11,000,000 barrels yearly, is owned by the 
independent producers, and is being held with the last ray of hope that 



the present Legislature will enact some measure that will afford relief. The 
only alternative would be to sell to the Standard Oil Company at a price 
that would absolutely net no profit to the producers and which would, on 
account of the most unfavorable terms of the contracts, result in the practical 
subsidization of all of the independent companies of the State, said subsidiza- 
tion being equivalent to the absolute control of the oil business of the San 
Joaquin Valley by the Standard Oil Company. 

The production of oil in the State of California for the year 1906 
was approximately 26,000,000 barrels, or a decline, of 8,000,000 barrels from 
the production of the year 1905. This decline, together with the usual in- 
crease of about 8,000,000 barrels, in reality makes a decline of about 16,000,000 
barrels from the possible production of the State under ordinary circum- 
stances. The ordinary production of the State of California under favorable 
conditions in regard to shipping the production is conceded to be at least 
50,000,000 barrels of oil a year. 

Returning for a moment to the question of transportation, I want to say 
that each of the oil fields above mentioned are touched by a railroad system, 
as follows: 

Kern River field, broad gauge tracks of both the Southern Pacific Com- 
pany and the Santa Fe, amply provided with tankage, loading racks, etc., for 
the loading of several hundreds of cars at a time. Dozens of pipe lines 
tap the fields but a short distance away. Facilities fully sufficient and effi- 
cient for the shipping of the entire production of the field with the exception 
of cars. 

Sunset field, broad gauge branch line track owned jointly by the Santa 
Pe and the Southern Pacific Company. All necessary facilities for the shipping 
of oil with the exception of cars. Most of -wells shut down. 

Midway field, an extension of the Sunset field, to which short pipe lines 
could be cheaply laid. One pipe line was projected and the pipe shipped to 
Sunset and distributed over the proposed route of the line, but the question 
of a car shortage became apparent, tank cars would not be guaranteed by the 
railroad company, and the project was abandoned at the cost of several 
thousands of dollars to an independent producer. All wells shut down. 

McKittrick field, broad gauge branch line of the Southern Pacific Com- 
pany, tankage and loading racks. Ample facilities for shipping the entire 
production of the field, except tank cars. Most of wells shut down. 

Coalinga field, broad gauge branch line of the Southern Pacific Com- 
pany, tankage and loading racks. Adequate shipping facilities for the inde- 
pendent production of the field with the exception of tank cars. Many wells 
shut down. 

Summing up the situation, it will be noted that, with one exception, 
the lines of the Southern Pacific Company are the only means of transporta- 
tion from the following fields, viz: 

Kern River, McKittrick, 

Sunset, Coalinga, 

Midway, 

With a view of assisting to overcome the existing equipment discrimina- 
tion, the Pacific Mining and Oil Reporter has drawn up the following bill, 
which is a duplicate of the "Texas law" with a few modifications, and, to- 
gether with copies of the foregoing article, mailed the same to representatives 
in both the Senate and Assembly, with an urgent appeal to effect its passage. 
Oil men generally should lend their support to the bill, which is the keynote to 
future success in the oil business: 



Hammond 
Iron Works 

Warren, Pa, 

U. S. A. 



Builders of 

Steel Tanks 

of the 

Highest 

Grade 




Stills 

Oondensors 

Agitators 

General 

Oil Refinery 

Work 



SALES AGENTS 

Herman Nieter 

29 Broadway 
New York. 

Krumbhaar&Aiken 

201 Defiegre Building 
New Orleans 



PACIFIC MINING & <>IL REPORTER. 



An Act to Regulate the Distribution of Freight Cars. 
The [•• train, represented in the Senate and \^ 

■ 

Art rner, manager »t ahippei of an} tr»-ight .it an\ 

kind shall make application in writing to anj superintendent, agent or other 
rtation, to any railway company, receiver or trus 
• rating a line ■•: I a point where the «;ir> desirod upon which 

to ship tin- freight, it shall be tin- duty oi sach railway company, receiver, 
truatet', or other person in *.-har^ to supply tin* number of cars *<• 

n-quirfd at the point Indicated in the application within a reasonable time 

hi the re. -i-ii it ut' such application, and 
shall supply the tars to the person or persona so applying therefor in the order 

1U Which applications are made, wit lion t giving preference to any person ; 

led, it the application be tor ten can or leas, tin' same shall be furnished 

within three days; and provided farther, the ipplication be tor titt\ 

railroad company may have ten lull days in which to Bupplj 

tin- ears. 

Article II. Said application for ears shall state the number of ears de- 
sired, the pla.e at which the] are desired and the 1 iiue they are desired; pro- 
vided, that the place designated shall be B.1 BOme station, switch or siding of 

the railroad company to which application is made. 

Article 111. — When the cars are applied for under tin- provisions of this 
chapter, if the] are not furnished, the railroad company so failing to furnish 
them shall forfeit to the party or parties Bp applying for them the sum of $50 

per day for each ear failed lo be furnished, to be recovered in any court of 
competent jurisdiction, together with the ...sis ot said action, attorneys' tees, 
and all actual damages that said applicant may sustain. 

Article IV. — Such applicanl shall, within forty-eight hours after sueh car 
or cars have been delivered an. I placed as hereinafter provided, fully load the 
same, and upon failure to do so. he shall forfeit and pay to the railroad com- 
pany the sum of $50 foi each ear not used; provided, that where applications 
are made on several days, all id' which are rilled upon the same day, the appli- 
cant shall have forty eight hours to load the cars furnished on the first appli- 
cation, ami the next forty eight hours to load the cars furnished on the next 
Application, and so on; and the penalty prescribed shall ifot accrue as to any 
car or lot of cars applied t"i on any one day, until the period within which 
they may be loaded has expired. And if s:ii.[ applicant shall not use sueh 
cars so ordered by him, and shall SO notify said railroad company, or its 
agent, he shall forfeit and pay lo i he s;n,l railroad company, in addition to 
the penalty herein prescribed, the actual damages that said railroad com- 
pany may sustain by said failure of the applicant to use said cars. 

Article V. — When cars have been supplied and loaded, it shall be the duty 
of the railroad company to deliver the same to the party or parties to whom 
they are consigned within a reasonable time, and the party or parties to 
whom the cars are consigned shall unload the same within forty-eight hours 
after delivery and notice, or forfeit to the railroad company the sum of #25 
per day for each car so left unloaded, to be recovered in any court of compe- 
tent jurisdiction. 

Article VI. — It shall be necessary for the party or parties bringing suit 
against any railroad company under the provisions of this law, to show by 
evidence that he or they had on hand at the time any demand for ears was 
made, the amount of oil, lumber, grain, fruit, wool, hides, or other commodity 
or freight necessary to load the cars so ordered; provided, that the provisions 
jof this law shall not apply in ease of strikes or other public calamity. 

Article VII. — This act shall take effect from its passage. 



POLICY OF STANDARD OIL COMPANY MOST BRUTAL. 



The Interstate Commerce Commission has just sent to Congress a report 
of the investigations made by it under the Tillman-Gillespie resolution con- 
cerning the relations of common carriers by rail to the production and dis- 
tribution of oil. The report points out generally the methods by which the 
Standard Oil Company has built up and perpetuated its monopoly. 

It is asserted in the report that the ruin of its competitors has been a 



distinct part of the policy ot the Standard oil Company In the past, ayaio 
niaticallv and persistently persued. 

The report continues substantially as follows; 

"The Standard Oil Company largely monopolizes the handling of petru 
leum from the mouth of the well until it is sold to the retailer and sometimes 
to the consumer, and under ordinary Circumstances its margin of protit is 
very large. 

"The evidence shows little basis for the contention that the enormous 
dividends of the Standard Oil Company are the legitimate result of its eco- 
nomics. Except tor its pipe lines, the Standard has but little legitimate ad 
vantage over the independent refiner. 

"The Standard buys advertising space in newspapers which it tills not 
with advertisements, but with reading matter prepared by agents kept for 
that purpose, and paid for at advertising rates, as ordinary views. The as- 
sumption is that this literature furnishes many of the ideas touching the great 
benefits conferred upon the public by the Standard Uil Company. 

In discussing the assertion contained in the report that "the ruin of its 
competitors has been a distinct, part of the policy of the Standard Oil Com- 
pany," the commission says one method has beeu the organization of a per- 
fect system of espionage over the shipments of its competitors, resulting in 
knowledge as to the destination of every car of oil leaving the refinery of 
an independent. The Standard agent at the destination, says the report, is 
held responsible if the independent oil is sold. 

It is asserted that it is the practice of the Standard, whenever a competitor 
erects a storage tank to which the oil is transferred from the tank car, to 
reduce the price of oil in that locality to such a point as to make the busi- 
ness unprofitable to such competitor, while prices were maintained in other 
localities. There was much complaint that the railroads allowed the Standard 
to erect its tanks at convenient points on the right of way and declined to 
accord this privilege to independent refiners. The commission says that it 
is satisfied that such discrimination has been very generally practiced in 
the past. 

In the matter of a remedy to effectually eliminate the possibility of fur- 
ther discriminations in favor of the Standard Oil Company, the report has 
the following to say: 

"Since in the past petroleum rates have not always been established to 
promote, but often to check traffic, and the tariffs are more or less per- 
meated with discriminations in favor of the Standard Oil Company, having 
been built up during a series of years in that view, it may be that this dis- 
crimination will never be eliminated by any process of complaint against 
a specifid rate or practice. Judging by the past, discriminations as to this 
traffic may arise more frequently than those now existing can be routed out 
by that method. As to no other important traffic is there an approach to the 
monopoly of the Standard Oil Company in that of oil. Under these condi- 
tions it may become necessary to the uprooting of established wrongs and 
the prevention of others that the government shall fix in the first instance for 
the rates and transportation of this traffic. This method has been adopted 
by the Legislature of one State. It probably will be found necessary to dis- 
associate in the case of oil, as in that of other commodities, the function of 
transportation from that of production and distribution. What other reme- 
dies in addition to those already provided it may be necessary to prescribe 
may be better determined in the future by the results of experience in admin- 
istering the present law." 



r^iVOY jviivivur^ivo^rui^iivo oomi^aivy 



Manufacturers of 



Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet Iron 
Works 



y* 1 ^ '^SSs^ W "^SWt^WRi*"' I 


..." 













Oil Well Casing 
Oil Stills 



OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 

Works:Cor. New Main and Date Streets, Baker Block P. O. Box 231, Station C. Telephone Main 196 

Office, 334 J^OFth Main Street, Ltos Angeles, Cal. 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER. 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 

The Oil and Mining Authority of the Pacific Coast 
Published Semi-Monthly by 

Pacific Oil Reporter Company 

Incorporated 



EDWARD S. EASTMAN 
MARIA R. WINN 
KARL R. EASTMAN 



Managing Editor 

Secretary- Treasurer 

Field Manager 



OFFICE AND EDITORIAL ROOMS 

Suite 37 Saint Murgo Building, 1300 Golden Gate Avenue 

San Francisco, California 

TELEPHONE WEST 6677 

Subscription price, $2.00 per year, in advance, to any part of the United States, Canada 
or Mexico. Add $1.00 for foreign subscriptions. 

Entered as second-class matter Nov. 5th, 190G, at the Post Office at San Francisco, Cal., 
under an Act of Congress of March 3, 1879. 



FIRST OIL THROUGH PANAMA PIPE LINE. 



According to statements from the offices of the Union Oil Company, the 
first shipments of oil has been run through the Panama pipe line without diffi- 
culty, the system meeting all the expectations of the big producing marketing 
company, and at once putting California in close touch with the oil market of 
the Atlantic. California oil can now be as cheaply transported to the Atlantic 
Coast as it can to Alaska or the Hawaiian Islands, where it has now taken 
preference over all other fuels in matter of convenience as well as economy. 

The plan of building a pipe line across the isthmus was formulated some 
three years ago by John Baker, manager of the marine, sales and manufactur- 
ing department of the Union Oil Company. As early as July, 1903, he con- 
ceived the possibilities of marketing California oils in the east. Transporta- 
tion was the only drawback. Being an independent company it could not 
secure rebates and shipments by trans-continental shipments were out of the 
question. The two months' voyage around the "Horn" was too dangerous 
and expensive. Therefore an Isthmian pipe line was the only practicable 
solution of the question. The proposition lias been successfully carried through, 
affording an outlet for a vast quantity of California oil. The line is an 8-inch, 
and has an approximate capacity of 25,000 barrels daily. Its entire length is 
but fifty miles, and the maximum elevation 210 feet. It runs along the Panama 
Railway right of way, which is almost parallel to the proposed route of the 
Panama canal. The Pacific terminus is near the city of Panama and the 
Atlantic terminus near the city of Colon. There is but one pumping station, 
which is at the initial station, Panama. 

The Santa Rita, arriving at San Francisco last week, now gives the 
Union Oil Company a fleet of nine vessels, as follows: 

Name. Class. Capacity. 

Lansing Tank steamer 1,974,000 gallons 

Santa Rita Tank steamer 2,205,000 gallons 

Santa Maria Tank steamer 2,205,000 gallons 



Washtenaw Tank steamer 1,239,000 gallons 



1,155,000 gallons 

1,125,600 gallons 

47-Mino gallons 

672,000 gallons 

344,400 gallons 



Roma Tank steamer. . . . 

Argyll Tank steamer .... 

Whittier Tank steamer. . . . 

Fullerton Ship 

Santa Paula Ship 

In addition to this fleet the company owns tugs, barges, etc., for handling 
its bay trade, which is large. It is the largest oil fleet under the Ameri- 
ca u bag. 

The company owns two refineries, has about 170,000 acres of oil land, in 
the largest individual producer of oil in California, owns its own pipe lines 
to the fields where it is producing, and is in every manner fully equipped for 
handling its immense trade. The company has always been a pioneer in new 
markets, opening up many new markets to the use of California fuel oil. It 
is a strong competitor to the Standard Oil Company, there being no affiliation 
between the two companies. 



APPROPRIATION FOR PORT HARFORD. 



The river and harbor appropriation reported to the United States House 
of Representatives carries an appropriation of $63,500 for San IJuis harbor, on 
which Port Harford is situated. A part of the amount is to be available on 
July 1st next and the balance on July 1st, 1908. it is understood that the 
money will be expended for extending the breakwater which has already been 
partially built. Port Harford, or San Luis Bay, is one of the best deep water 
harbors on the Pacific Coast. It is now coining into great prominence on 
account of its growing oil shipping. Three pipe lines terminate here, with a 
fourth building, and several more contemplated. The refinery of the Cali- 
fornia Petroleum Refineries, Limited, is now building on the bay. About 
twenty-five oil tank steamers now load regularly at the Port, besides various 
freight vessels which connect with the Pacific Coast Railway, of which Porl 
Harford is a terminal. 



Mining Companies Install Oil Burners. 

The Yellow Jacket, Caledonia, Belcher, Confidence, Overman, Crown Point 
and Challenge mines, known as the South End Comstocks, will close down at 
once to allow the installation of oil burners in their engines. 

Like all the other Nevada mining towus, Virginia City finds itself gripped 
hard and fast by the fuel ogre. Both houses and mines have beeu running 
on short supplies for some time past. Every sera]) of wood from chips to 
condemned railroad ties that could be gathered for miles around have been 
utilized for stoves and furnaces. Two days ago a big tressle was cut down 
and the refuse timbers were apportioned among the most needy families. Those 
mining companies dependent upon wooil and coal to run their machinery saw 
they were caught in a bad position, and they will in future take measures to 
prevent its repetition. Hence the order to shut down temporarily and install 
the oil burners. 

Preparations for the change have been quietly going on for some time past. 
Two big oil tanks, each of 9,000 gallons capacity, are now being built in 
Reno to act as reservoirs. The other machinery is almost completed or is in 
transit, so that the only time lost will be what is consumed in assembling the 
parts and getting them in place. Meanwhile the very valuable machinery on 



jsassasas®!^^ 



1 





00. I 






Carry in Stock a Complete Line of 

OIL COUNTRY TUBULAR GOODS 
DRILLING RIGS and OIL WELL SUPPLIES 



Bakersfield 



Los Angeles 



^ ^ J^ lw o^^^rt^ ^l^ ^^mlV. »g^^»^x^^>^x^x^^^ 



Santa Maria | 

i 



II 



I A V. j'ut 
tan til Efltl mi ix - 

I Ik rii.l nl in 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER. 

Have you seen our 



Santa Rita Brings Cargo of Pianos. 
Thi Union Oil I ompaoj - tank steam?) "Santa Ril 

h from Now York, I" h ronaiMteil 

fiiit-m of iIil< kit ■ i\.'i| hi this port, ami 

■ Iii< i'n.'iii.' i 'oast. The 
i \ ;i n.n ol ma i. 

- mta Ki tii will bo imnuntiateh |>u1 into I'ommission in thi 



Oil Prices Soaring. 
tloged shortage s!ii:i is given l>\ the Standard Oil 

n\ :ui opportunity to raise t > i * - price ol oil in San Francisco to • i pei 
barrel, or aboul l<"» per cent above that quoted - ndent 

producers are un cure »:irs and those who did not provide them 

9 with u supply must pav tlit- Standard its pi 
neral Manager * alvin of the Southern Pa< iSo lias stated that the 
company would have an additional 60U cars in the State within the raexl 
month; but who baa not heard the sum. promise many times before? The 
only reason to suppose thai the Southern Pacific I will provide itself 

with more ti - that it expects the '.'Texas law " to pass and does aol 

want to be kept napping. The only reason for supposing that the law will 
not pass is that the legislative body tnighl beconn contaminated; but then 
we had to eonvicl Beveral legislators bul u year ago for bribery, and we do 

for a moment believe the Southern Pacific Company would hesitate to 
pay b good liberal bribe to kill the "Texas law." 



New Pipe Line for Union Oil Conpany. 
Union Oil Company has distributed its 8-inch pipe along the i'igh.1 of way 
■ Pacific Coast Railway from the Santa Maria oil field to Port Har- 
ford. It was formerly intended to secure a right of way where there would 
be less grade, but this was finally deemed inadvisable on aecQitnl of a greal 
d»-al of trouble in getting rights to cross certain properties, and, inasmuch as 
the company already had its right of way along the line of the railroad, where 
it already has one 6-ineh line in operation, no time was lost in getting the 
work started. 

The actual laying of the line 1ms already begun at the Pdrl Harford end, 
and will be hurried as rapidly as possible to completion. When finished the 
Union will have pipe line facilities for about 35,000 barrels daily. The prob- 
able production of its properties in the Santa Maria field will fully equal this 
amount by the time the line is finished. Togi thi i with its fleet of oil tankers 
and its recently completed pipe line across the Isthmus of Panama, the com- 
pany is in an excellent position to continue as the largesl producer and shipper 
of oil in this country. 



ANOTHER BIG LAND DEAL ON. 

Another big land deal, second iii proportions only to that recently con- 
summated by the California Oilfields Limited, is now being negotiated for 
valuable holdings in the Coalinga field. A Mr. \V. M. Hall, whose identity is 
not known, but who is supposed to represent the Standard Oil Com pi ny, lias 
secured an option on the properties of the Oil City and Twentj Eight Oil 
Companies, depositing a liberal amount id' money in a Fresno bank as a guar- 
antee of good faith. 

The option calls for the properties (not the stock) of the companies, 
and the prices agreed upon are as follows: 

Twenty-Eight Oil Company $480,000.00 

Oil City Petroleum I 'nmpany 375,000.00 



Total $855,000.00 

The above prices are based upon the value of the issued capital stock of 
the companies at the rate of $8 per share for the Twenty-Eight Oil Com- 
pany and 75c per share for the Oil City Petroleum Company. The option 
runs until the 19th of February. 

The assent of the necessary two-thirds of the stock of eaeh company has 
already hern given, and if I lie deals are rnnsuui mated the Stocks of the 
respective companies will be railed in, the entire proceeds of the sale dis- 
tributed among the stockholders and the companies Liquidated. 

The result, of the negotiations will be fully reported in the next issue of 
this publication. 



R. H. HANDY RETURNS. 

R. H. Handy, for some time past runner ted with the Union Oil Com- 
pany of California, .and who has been in Smith America for two years or 
more, has returned to this city for a shorl time. Any part} desiring to 
communicate with Mr. Hardy ran reach him through the office of the Pacific 
Mining & Oil Reporter. 



CALIFORNIA DIAMOND BX 

Casing and Drive Pipe? It's the 
thing for d eep wells. Made in fol- 
lowing sizes and weights, and 
carried in stock at all our stores 

CASING 



Size 


Weight 


Size 


Weight 


59 s inches 


2o lbs. 


95/8 inches 


33 lbs 


6% inches 


20 lbs. 


1 1 l/% inches 


40 lbs 


65 x inches 


20 lbs. 


i iy 2 inches 


40 lbs 


8% inches 


2S lbs. 








DRIVJ© 


PIPE 






Size 


Weight 






4 j4 inches 


15 lbs 





THE NATIONAL SUPPLY COMPANY 

117 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

BRANCH STORES 

Coalinga, Cal. Bakersfield, Cal. Orcutt, Cal. 

TUBULAR BOILERS 



Large Dome 
Dry Steam 
Assured 
Full 
Capacity 




Easy access 

to every 

part for 

Cleaning, 

Examination 

and 

Repairs 



Slock of Boilers from 25 h. p, lo SO li. p, on hand for immediate delivery 

Made of best Flange Tested Steel. Tubes of best American manufacture and of 
standard gauge; Rivets of best quality; Fixtures heavy and durable. Every 
boiler complete, including following fixtures and fittings: Half arch front, com- 
plete with fire and ash doors 17x17 inches, with draft dampers; anchor bolts 
for front gates and bearers ; rear arch bars ; cleanout door and frame ; wall 
plates and rollers ; smoke stack and guy wire ; pop safety valve ; steam gauge 
and syphon ; water column of large capacity, complete with water gauge and 
three gauge cocks ; blow-off cock ; feed valve and check valve with nipples. 
Portable outfits and everything required for drilling; or boring 
Test Wells. Brass Goods, Kittinjjs and Valves of all descriptions. 



Write for prices 



R. H. HERRON CO,, affiliated with the 

OIL WELL SUPPLY CO. 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

212 North Los Angeles St. 



SAN FRANCISCO. CAL' 
11 1 Townifnd St. 



10 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL EBPORTER. 



One Good Investment is Worth a Lifetime of Labor 




MILLIONAIRES' ROW,; 



Goldfield GOLD-HORN Minin 

i 

Par value, $1.00, fully paid and non-assessable C6pitaIlZatiOll 

JOHN J. DUFFIE, President T. J. DONOVAN, 

Directors, J. W. HENDERSON, JOHN J. DUFFIE, 



Several Leases Paying 1,000 Per Cent 
to Investors 

The Truitt lease on the Mohawk in Millionaires' Row, with 
the Hayes-Monnette and the Frances-Mohawk, has proved 
one of the most sensational producers in the camp. It is 
handled by Truitt 's Leasing Company, which sold stock last 
spring to begin operations. Not a pick was stuck in the ground 
until late in May, yet in September this company declared a 
dividend of 25 cents a share out of the earnings, which was 
100 per cent on the investment, and the company announces 
its intention of paying ten more dividends of 25 cents each 
before the first of the year. 

Nowhere else does money work so quickly or earn so enorm- 
ous a wage. 

Our GOLD-HORN LEASE Expires 
September 30, 1908 

We are developing our lease on broad lines designed for big 
work, sinking at this moment a double compartment shaft. 
We have shippers East, North, South, and West, and have 
every reason to believe that we will encounter large bodies 
of high-grade ore in some of the mineralized ledges passing 
through our, lease. 



We have the same formation and ledges as the Velvet (which 
adjoins us on the northwest). Fortunes have been made all 
around us. We confidently expect to make enormous and fab- 
ulous profits for all who go in with us. We commenced to sink 
October 1, 1906, with twenty-four months to run. When we 
open rich ore, our stock will rise by LEAPS AND BOUNDS. 



FACTS 



We own a long, valuable lease on gold-bearing ground in 
Goldfield. 

We own 20 acres of proven territory in Bullfrog Mining 
District, near Gold Bar Mine. 

We have purchased for our Gold-Horn Lease the latest elec- 
trical hoisting machinery. 

Our officers are among the big mine makers of Nevada. 

We should ship ore and distribute profits before April 1st. 

Life of our Gold-Horn Lease is twenty-two months. 

Stock to be listed on San Francisco and Goldfield Exchanges. 

In ordinary mining you take risks. Mining by leasing con- 
tains smallest element of risk, and profits should be enormous 
and quick. 

You can purchase Goldfield Gold-Horn Mining and Leasing 
Corporation stock to-day for 20c a share. 

Only 100,000 shares to be sold at 20c ; you should act quickly. 
Order NOW by wire. 



Le 

"G 
ductii 
the n 
ducec 
good 
as a 
retun 
panie 
corpo 
dend- 

comp: 
comp; 
gethe 

M. 
a sh. 
Moh; 
of mo 
field. 
Moh;! 
Lagu 
east 






I' ICIFIC MINING & oil. REPORTER. 



11 



Mining Has Made More People Rich Than Any Other Industry 



- A 


J^ 60LD HORN 


























«Mnk' 




.«P 3!, ^ 


i l» ,WW« ^ 


- 








GENE.RALVIEWOF THE 

OHRWK.COMBINRTION 
|'ACTION,FLORENCE«no 
)M6INATI0N MINES, 

3LDFI ELD, NEVADA 

USA. 


' ^8 


Hi 


|Jj||E . ■: | 






^ .'.CD N»305O 
3 N^w.(9o6 













FIELD, NEVADA 



and Leasing Corporation 



$1,000,000 



Treasury Stock, $400,000 



ce-President W. R. MARKT, Secretary and Treasurer 

J. DONOVAN C. L. KNOWLTON, W. R. MARKT 



Pay Biggest and Quickest Dividends 

ll camp is not three years old, and the daily pro- 
lellow metal has reached the $100,000 mark, or at 
l>3,000,000 per month, most of which is being pro- 
nasing companies. A good leasing company on a 
I a good thing for investors and stockholders ; for 
Heir money is put directly in the ground and the 
|ften quick and profitable. Several leasing com- 
njust paid dividends. There are a score of other in- 
jl:ases that soon will enter the producing and divi- 
Wlist. 

let that more dividends will be paid out by leasing 
luring the coming year than from all the other 



the camp working on company account put to- 
itorial Goldfield "News." 



|idvanced in one year from i 5 cents to $20.00 
hat's a profit good enough for any one. 
d Jumbo are to-day beyond the financial reach 
But there will be other Mohawks in Gold- 
ill, it only required development work on the 
open up its vast ore bodies. Red Top, 
Id-Horn and St. Ives, all in line and directly 
Mohawk, are in line for Mohawk's success. 



For a Limited Time We Offer 

Fifty thousand shares of the treasury stock at 
twenty cents per share. 

This allotment will soon be over-subscribed. We 
have no salaried officers, a healthy treasury, and 
no debts. This is an opportunity of TO-DAY. 

Wire your subscription immediately, and remit 
by mail. Address : 

W. R. MARKT, 

322 Bush St., San Francisco, Cal. 
References: 

Italian-American Bank, San Francisco. 
Nevada Bank & Trust Co., Goldfield. 



12 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER. 



COALINGA. 

Section Six Oil Company are making fine progress on their No. 1 and 
are putting in 12 ^» -inch easing. They are now down several hundred feet. 

John A. Bunting and associates have leased the southwest quarter of the 
northwest quarter of section 6, township 21, range 15, from the Section Six 
Oil Company, and will begin work on No. 1 as soon as the weather will 
permit. 

The Associated Oil Company is getting materials on the ground as fast 
as the roads will permit for several rigs on section 36, township 20, range 14. 
This is an excellent property and will be developed as rapidly as possible. 

The Manchester Oil Company on Section 19 has shut off the water in 
No. 1 with 10-inch casing and are now putting in the 8-inch preparatory to 
entering the oil sands. They have every assurance of a good well in this 
virgin territory. 

The Commercial Petroleum No. 1, on section 12, township 21, range 14, is 
making slow progress, owing to a very difficult formation recently en- 
countered. 

The West Coalinga, on the same section, has been shut down for several 
days waiting for a new pump to supply them with water from the Lueile. 
They are now ready to start again and will push the well to completion as 
rapidly as possible. 

No. 5, on the Inea property, is down now about 800 feet in 10-inch, and 
hope to shut off the water in a few days. 

Eig No. 8 of the Wabash Oil Company is rapidly nearing completion and 
will be ready to spud in soon. 

The Limited 's No. 3, on the recently acquired property of the Pittsburg- 
Coalinga, is now making hole rapidly and will soon be heard from as a big 
producer. 

The Shreeves No. 1 has been perforated for about 300 feet, but owing 
to the loss of tools have not been able to bring in the well. The difficulty 
will be but a few days in being overcome. They expect at least a 2000-barrel 
well. 

Much interest is being manifested in this section with the prospects 
of this great oil fields becoming a part of Kings County. The sentiment here 
is almost unanimous for the change of county boundaries, so as to give a 
closer county seat and better attention to roads. 

Well No. 3 of the California and New York Oil Company is now flowing, 
making about 300 barrels daily. This property has increased greatly in pro- 
duction, making more oil during the month of January than any other month 
for the past seven months. 

Well No. 5, section 12, California-Diamond Oil Company, is 2140 feet in 
S^-inch casing and work is going ahead nicely. Eight thousand barrels of 
oil has been delivered from the property of this company at Sunset. 

Well No. 14, section 26, California-Monarch Oil Company, continues to 
make about 350 barrels daily. It is classed among the best wells on_ the east 
side field. 



OIL EXCHANGE ELECTS MEMBERS. 

The rise in the prices of fuel oil at the wells is having its effect upon the 
local Oil Exchange. Memberships which, for the past year, have gone begging 
at a small value, are beginning to command a premium. There seems to be a 
growing movement to join the "Oil Board," and the prices for seats are rising. 

Even the busy brokers of the Mining Exchange are taking the time to 
consider oil. Although fully 1 one-half the membership of the California Stock 
and Oil Exchange is composed of members of the San Francisco Stock and 
Exchange Board, still five members of the Mining Exchange have been elected 
to membership in the Oil Board. 

During the last week, applications came in so thickly that President G. 
S. Clark decided to call a special meeting for the purpose of passing on these 
applications. Last Saturday the following nine members were elected: H. A. 
Whitely, Frank Sternberg, H. U. Maxfield, W. H. Kent, J. Kullman, Percival 
D. Kahn, F. A. Houseworth, Geo. W. Hinkel, and Elliott M. Epsteen. 

The newly elected brokers are all either oil men or stock brokers of 
standing. Mr. Epsteen is probably the youngest man ever elected to member- 
ship in any exchange in this city. While only in his early twenties, Mr. 
Epsteen has efficiently carried out the duties of assistant secretary in the Oil 
Exchange for the past several years, and his courteous manners have made 
him popular and well known on "the street. " He will continue in the capacity 
of assistant secretary of the Exchange, in addition to his brokerage interests. 

The daily session of the Oil Exchange will hereafter be held at 2:05 p. m., 
instead of 12:15 p. m. as heretofore. 



OIL AND MINING NOTES. 



The gross earnings of the Union Oil Company for the year 1906 were 
$3,214,946.72, and the total expenses $2,185,476.16, making the net earnings 
$1,029,474.16, or a monthly average of $85,789.93. 

It is authentically reported that the Associated Oil Company will shortly 
commence the drilling of about forty wells in the Kern River field. A line 
of wells will be run up along the lines of sections 29 and 32. These wells, it 



is said, are independent of the 75 that the Southern Pacific Company will 
shortly commence drilling. The main drawback just now is the lack of 
lumber for the derricks on account of the lumber famine at San Francisco. 

It is now freely admitted that the Sunset Railway, between Bakersfield 
and Sunset, is owned jointly by the Santa Fe and Southern Pacific Company. 
The Santa Fe owns large holdings in the Sunset-Midway district, but the 
Southern Pacific has wisely avoided that district, that it could not be said 
to have entered a combination in restraint of trade. If we can get the Texas 
car act passed we do not care who owns the roads. 

The Illinois Crude Oil Company has declared a monthly dividend of one 
cent a share, which is to be the regular rate in the future. This will make 
a monthly distribution of about $2,000. The Illinois Crude is a member of 
the Independent Agency, which recently made a contract with the Associated 
Oil Company. The company has eight producing wells and a ninth drilling 
and expected in within a few days. 

Some of the richest ore ever uncovered in the Bullfrog district is being 
taken out of the Bullfrog West Extension. Len P. McGarry and Judge V. T. 
Hoggatt are heavily interested in this property and recently brought a 
quantity of ore of the specimen variety into town. Samples gave results as 
high as $5,500 to the ton. The shaft is said to be literally plastered with free 
gold. The genial Judge and Postmaster are welcoming visitors to the 
property. 

Nearly ten millions of dollars has been paid out in dividends by com- 
panies listed on the California Stock and Oil Exchange. And this has all 
been done in the face of low prices for the product. It is safe to say that 
another ten millions has been paid by companies not listed. With higher 
prices for oil securities in California oil companies are becoming most at- 
tractive. A fair sized boom in the oil business is now assured, 



THE CALIFORNIA GOLD AND COPPER COMPANY. 

The chief property of the Signal mining district of San Bernardino 
county, California, is undoubtedly that of the California Gold and Copper 
Company at Vontrigger, of which Mr. A. H. Cram is president and manager. 

This great property, consisting of nine full claims, surveyed and applica- 



PETROLEUM 

A TREATISE ON 

THE GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION AND GEOLOGICAL OCCUR- 
RENCE OP PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS; THE PHYSICAL 
AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES, PRODUCTION, AND REPINING 
OP PETROLEUM AND OZOKERITE; THE CHARACTERS AND 
USES, TESTING, TRANSPORT, AND STORAGE OF PETROLEUM 
PRODUCTS; AND THE LEGISLATIVE ENACTMENTS RELATING 
THERETO; TOGETHER WITH A DESCRIPTION OP THE SHALE 
OIL AND ALLIED INDUSTRIES; AND A PULL BIBLIOGRAPHY 

By 

SIR BOVERTON REDWOOD 

COMPLETE IN TWO VOLUMES, 1100 PAGES $13.50 Net 

Numerous maps and plates and 337 illustrations in the text. 

J. B. LIPPINCOTT COMPANY Washington Square, Philadelphia, Pa. 



SEND FOR MY MARKET LETTER 

If you read my Market Letter of last week and followed my advice 
on St. Ives you should have made money. You don 't have to take my 
word for it, but go to anyone who is receiving my private advices for 
the past few months and see if I haven 't been right in my predictions 
of the market. My next Market Letter will contain some more facts. 
To get it your name will have to be on the mailing list. I give you 
the facts as best I know them and these facts I secure through my 
Goldfield office and by personal visits to the Nevada Camps. 

Send your name and address for my private Market Letter. It 
costs you nothing. 

A. J. MOORE, 
BOOMS 29 & 30 BACON BLOCK OAKLAND, CAL. 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER. 



13 



tion made for palejit, >* bound i" becomi ■ of the big copper producers 

pper proper! lereloped aw this has in the i-m^i 

frw \ ■ 

t, nil in good <t.-. nbonl 600 feel f:i«t 

I nn.i .in a parallel ledge So. - which is also in high grade 

Shall No. ' Bouthweal of No. J and 

in ore running from '■'• per eonl to 4n per cenl coj per 

g I d and silver. 

In thafl No. ;■ between four and five luiniltv.l feel of levels have beon 
run and all through good paving 

For the fir*! 75 or 80 feel carbonate and red oxide ore was struck, but a1 

this depth ■ rich body of sulphite on was ope I which u'i"> vs richei as the 

w..rk progresses, thus proving thai the property is nut a surface proposition, 
but one whiefa >;o.-s down. 

A r •-•-•- n t trst made of ore from all parts of the property shows an nvcragc 
.if 15.8 copper. 

Burley .Irills arc used iii the shaft and ilrit'ts. a Fairbanks-Morse gasoline 
engine is used t<> hoist tbe ore and operate the coinpreasor for the ihills. 

In addition to the three in shafts there are about 25 prospect hole* 

from 5 tn 30 feel deep scattered over the property, every one of which is in 
ore. Iii fact, the property is one great body of copper and can be worked 
right from the surface, as a quarry with steam shovels, the iame as the big 
at Bingham Canyon, Utah, which are paying mill, 'tis. 

Another great advantage this mine, and in fact the Signal district, has 
over many others, is the railroad facilities, the Santa Pe main line running 
vast and west through the heart of it and the Barnwell branch of the same 
road running north and south and connecting at Leastalk with the Sail Lake, 
thus giving the mine easy access to both of the great continental roads. The 
mine being only one and s half miles from the railroad with a marly level 
road to the mine. 

The California Bold and Copper Company is now developing water in the 
shaft preparatory to installing a new reduction works. They are also sinking 
a new well on tin- property for domestic ami commercial purposes. 



DUTCHMAN CREEK. 



Petroleum. — A treatise on the geographical distribution and geological 
occurrence of petroleum and natural gas; the physical and chemical proper- 
ties, production and refining of petroleum and ozokerite; the characters and 
uses, testing, transport and storage of petroleum products; and legislative 
enactments relating thereto; together with a description of the shale oil and 
allied industries. By Sir Boverton Redwood. Second edition, revised and en- 
larged; 1906. Two volumes, 11)65 pages; price $13.50, London, Charles Grif- 
fin & Co., Ltd.; Philadelphia, J. B. Lippineott Company. 

"Oil Wells in the Woods" will be appreciated by lovers of oil field ro- 
mance. Around a pretty story of love and hope the author, John Christopher 
II Hay, has drawn an authentic and interesting history of the early days of the 
oil industry in Pennsylvania. Many of the instances foremost in the memory of 
the old-time oil man are here reiterated in a most pleasing manner. Pub 
lished and sold by Outing Publishing Company, New York. 



Mr. H. C Behneman, president of the Pomeroy Securities Company, re- 
turned a few days ago from Dutchman Creek, Walker Mining District, Ne- 
vada, and reports great strikes have been made there of late. The records 
of the County Recorder's office at Hawthorne show that up to January 28th, 
or in just three months' time, that there were 3248 notices of location tiled 
there from this district alone. In a conversation with Mr. Behneman he 
said: "1 believe more talked of samps in Southern Nevada will turn out to 
be mere pickings in the desert when enough time is given the new district 
to develop the mines. There are hundreds of outcroppings and there is unt a 
one that you cannot obtain values from; but the main fact is that the values 
are there and all that is needed is to sink down to the pay dirt. There are 
now eight leases at work on the "Dutchman," and all getting- higher values 
as they go down. On the Dutchman Creek of Nevada Gold Mining Companj 's 
property a sample of ore that I brought down with me assays $210.45 a ton, 
and I think that this will turn out to be one of the leaders of the camp. The 
town of Dutch Creels is an ideal camp and by those who have been there sax- 
it is "the most beautiful mining camp in Nevada." 

Among the many capitalists and promoters interested in Dutch Creek and 
vicinity may be mentioned the following: Wingfield and Nixon, Geo. Shively 
of Goldtield. Chas. Finninger & Co. of Philadelphia. D. M. Tittell and Cleve- 
land Dam of San Francisco, Bert Slessinger, also of San Francisco; W. W. 
Stewart of Reno, Adams & Miller of Hawthorne, Dr. Cyrus Perillo and Dr. C. 
Sangree of New York, Walter J. Kauftnann of Philadelphia. Sam Baylis 
of Nome, Dawson and Goldtield, Francis Young of Manhattan, Webb H. 
Parkinson and A. A. Stanton of Goldtield, Governor Mitchell, J. R. Hubbard, 
Jack Davis (Diamond Field Jack) of Diamond Field. 



CHAS. EDELMAN 

Notary Public 



American National Bank 



Merchants Exchange Building 



B&R PAPERS for Sheathing Dwelling 

Are Unequalled. 

Write- for samples and prices. 

BONESTELL, RICHARDSON & CO. 

California's Leading Paper House 
473 to 485 SIXTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



BANK OF SANTA MARIA 

Capital and Surplus $150,000.00 

The Pioneer Bank of the Oil Regions 

Solicits the Accounts of Oil Men and Investors 



Chas. Bradley, President 

B. Pezzoni, Vice-President 

Paul 0. Tietzc-n, Manager ami Cashier 

L. P. Searoni, Assistant Cashier 



Santa Maria 

California 



PRIVATE R00HS 



JULES WITTMAN 



Jules' Restaurant 

Only First-Class Restaurant in Burned District 
Formerly 315-323 Pine Street 

Regular Dinner, with Wine, 75 cts. 
Sundays and Holidays, $1 00 

OPEN EVENINGS 

326 BUSH STREET, Bet. Montgomery and Kearny. San Francisco 

Steel Oil Tanks 

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Also City and County Bank, & Nevada Bank 
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L. tf M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

1820 Fillmore Street 

Telephone West 6288 
Branches:— Los Angeles. Portland. Seattle. Spokane, 





14 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPOETER. 



GOLDFIELD. 

Goldfield, Nev. ; January 31, 1907. 
With the return of utmost confidence which came with the settlement of 
the labor difficulties in Goldfield, there came a resumption of brisk trading on 
the Exchange and lively development at the mines and prospects which is 
promising for Goldfield an era of prosperity unprecedented in her eventful 
career. In no previous time has there ever been the same amount of exploita- 
tion among the various diggings of the districts. Very seldom has there 
ever been before a stronger demand for the older securities and the newer 
botations on 'Change. The first week following the settlement of the strike 
was the second largest in the history of Goldfield from the standpoint of 
ehe values of shares transferred. 

The rich leases on the Mohawk have expired and there has been time to 
partially check up accounts. The figures so revealed prove the Mohawk to 
be the greatest gold mine of its age in the history of the world. Though it 
began operations only late in the summer of last year, the Hays-Monette 
lease alone has produced $4,400,000, besides a million dollars' worth of high- 
grade blocked out and left in its stopes. Its greatest record for a single day 
was $60,000, and its largest month was October, $1,300,000. The richest lot of 
ore shipped assayed better than $100,000 per ton. The Prances-Mohawk lease 
scored a production in excess of $2,000,000, the Curtis lease about $32,000, the 
Kalius lease $90,000 and the Truett enough to pay a 2o per cent dividend, 
^nipments Irom Goldfield are going out at the rate of about $400,000 per week. 
There are in the neignborhood of 3,500 miners in Goldfield district, as 
shown by the books of the Western Federation, but since the settlement of the 
strike it has been impossible for tne mines to obtain full crews. There is 
employment open in the district now lor at least 5,000 miners, which fact 
merely goes vu show the extraordinary amount of development being done. 

One thing that threatened the district's prosperity, eveu after the labor 
troubles were over, was the possible failure of tlie Sullivan Trust Company, one 
or tne most widely advertised and best known promotion houses in the west. 
Ail its troubles have been tided over by the reorganization of the corporation. 
At its first annual meeting reports of mine superintendents were read, and it 
was decided to continue development of the estate of the eleven corporated 
and three unincorporated properties controlled by the company. The recent 
financial embarrassment was attributed to the company 's expensive efforts to 
support its stocks in the face of adverse conditions. Marketable assets were 
found to be three times the amount of obligations, and these new officers were 
elected: T. B. Rickey, president; Alexander Russel, vice president and general 
manager; Geo. D. l J yne, secretary, and J. L. Lindsay, treasurer. Messrs. 
Rickey, Russel, Pyne, Gov. Sparks and J. D. Campbell will serve as directors 
for the ensuing six months. Mr. Campbell is mine manager. 

A fair criterion to the prosperity of the camp is the amount of banking 
business being done. Nevada is the second State in the Union from the stand- 
point of cash per capita, and that is not surprising when it is known that de- 
posits in the Goldfield banks alone amount to approximately $20,000,000. 

Other figures which prove conclusively that Goldlield is one of the liveliest 
cities in America are furnished authoritatively by the postmaster of Gold- 
field. The receipts for the several quarters of last year ending on the 
dates here named are as follows: 

March 31 $12,155.57 

June 31 13,532.48 

September 30 16,612.19 

December 31 35,769.13 

Total for year 1906 $78,069.37 

Receipts for the last month of last year were $10,168.35, which is at the 
rate of $122,020.20 per annum. There were 22,441 money orders issued in 
1906, and 3,298 of them were issued in December, representing a cash value 
of $66,843. 

In the last six months of the year 1906 there were 20,927 registered let- 
ters dispatched. 

A long distance telephone line to connect San Francisco with Goldfield, 
Tonopah, Manhattan and other nearby camps is being built by the Sunset 
Company. Money has been raised for the building of an independent tele- 
graph line from Goldfield to Reno, San Francisco and Salt Lake and to com- 
pete with the Western Union, which is now in the field and is drawing down 
tolls at the rate of about $1,000,000 a year. The Postal Telegraph Company has 
announced its intention to enter the field. 

Prominent citizens of Goldfield have organized a board of trade, which 
promises to be one of the most powerful influences working to the upbuilding 
of the city. There will be several bureaus subordinate to the board, and 
each will be in charge of a capable se'eretary. Every train into camp is 
crowded to the platform with new arrivals, many of whom are taking up 
their residences in the metropolis of the desert. To care for the great influx 
an enormous tent hotel has been constructed, and has been full to the utmost 
■ever since it was thrown open. There are several magnificent fireproof 
hotels in course of erection. 

Some of the stocks in the various districts of Nevada which are at this 
time showing exceptional life and noteworthy advances are: Conqueror, Dia- 
mondfield, Florence, Goldfield Consolidated Mines, Goldfield Mining, Gold Bar, 





PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY 






BARLOW & HILL 






MAP MAKERS 




Bakersfield, 




California. 



GEO. H. BUSH 




ATTORNEY AT LAW 




1300 Golden Gate Avenue San Francisco, 


California 









A. S. 


COOPER 


C. 


E. 


M. 


E. 










GEOLOGIST AND 


MINERALOGIST 




2621 


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Avenue 










Berkeley, 


California 



CRESCENT BLUE PRINT CO. 

MINING MAPS 
.Blue Prints and Tracing 



Tel. Franklin 773. 



612 O'Farrell Street 



San Francisco, California 



HENRY C. DEMMING 

MINING ENGINEER 
Geologist Mineralogist and Chemist 
79 wells located without a "duster" 
15-17 North Third Street. 



Harrisburg, Pa. 



CHARLES GREEN 

DRAFTSMAN 

General Drafting and Tracing— BLUE PRINTS— Fine Map Work a 

Specialty. 

Telephone Berkeley 461 

2430 Channing Way Berkeley, California 



WM. P. HUBBARD, 




Attorney at Law 




1300 Golden Gate Avenue, 


San FranciBco. 









CHARLES F. 


HUMPHREY 










Attorney at Law 










Suite 32 St. 


Mingo Bldg. 




1300 


Golden 


gate 


Avenue 


San Francisco, 


California. 









J. 


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NESBIT, Attorney 

PATENTS 








United States 


and Foreign Trade Marks Registered 


921 


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Pittsburg, 


Pennsylvania 







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EMERY & CO., 










Chemists and Chemical Engineers 






Bureau 


of Inspection and Tests 








San Francisco, 




Oakland Office, 


1068 


Broadway. 






PACIFIC MINING & Oil, REPORTER. 



15 



Gr*«t B*nd, Jumbo. Mohawk, Red Top. Atlanta. Bine Hull, Booth, Columbia 
Mountain, Combination Fraction, Daisy, Dixie, Gol rifle) d Colombia, Great Bend, 
Annex, Qroal Band Extension, Jombo Extension, Kawanna, Lacuna, Wayne, 
Milltown, Portland, Silver Piek, skylark. Triangle, Vernal and Yellow Rose, in 
GoldfleJd district; Tonopan Home, Tonopah Mining, Golden Anchor and Rescue, 
in Tonojtah district ; ftfajflower, National Bank, Original Bullfrog, Pedestal and 
Tramp Consolidated, in BnUfrog district; April Pool Extension, Buffalo, 
aolidntrd Extension, Keystone. Little Joe, Indian Camp and Manhattan Mining, 
in Manhattan district; Astec, Eagle, Florence, Eagle's Meat, Nevada It ilia and 
Red Rook, in Fairview diatriet, and Nevada Alpine on Lone Mountain, 



MANHATTAN. 

Manhattan, Nov., January 31, I!"i7. 

With the vesting of title in \v. s. Johnson i" a large acreage of mineral 
bearing ground in the rich Litigation Hill section, a portion of the Manhattan 
district that has lain dormant since the early Ways of the camp is to I"' 
developed. Ever since Johnson and Pan MacNamara discovered the value of 
the gold-bearing ledges crossing its ragged slopes the greater pint ion of 
Litigation Hill had been a bone a bone of legal contention between them 
until the recent decision of Judge Breen quieted title, if not the bitterness 
of spirit engendered by the quarrel ami subsequent suit. In a similar suit 
in which other mineral-bearing ground in the same locality was the cauSUS 
belli. Judge Breen vested the title claimed by MncXamara and associates in 
the Manhattan Union Mining Company. By the two decisions title is estab- 
lished to a large area long considered particularly rich in gold values and 
all litigation over claims on Litigation Hill is practically at end. In the case 
of the Manhattan Consolidated, however, W. S. Johnson has adversed thai 
company's application for United States patent on the grounds of prior 
location, and of breach of faith on the part of Philbriek and associates, who, 
under the title of the Manhattan Consolidated Mining Company, have made 
the application for patent. 

Having established his rights to the ground claimed by MacNamara, Mr. 
Johnson is preparing to work it on an extensive scale and is now in Han 
Francisco for the purpose of arranging matters connected with the property 
and the shipment of machinery. The Manhattan Union Company is likewise 
preparing to operate their Litigation Hill estate extensively, so it appears 
probable that additional interest will shortly attach to the east end of the 
pay belt. That the ground owned by Johnson and the Union people is well 
worth fighting for is well established. Specimens broken from the sorrated 
outcrops of the huge ledges crossing their acreages are in a number of in- 
stances more than half gold, and all have a beauty unique in .Southern Ne- 
vada camps at least. 

At a depth of 35 feet in the main working shaft on the estate of the Ral- 
ston Valley Gold and Copper Company a ledge has been tapped that both 
pans and assays well. The vein matter completely fills the shaft's bottom and 
neither wall of the ledge is in sight. The working force has been increased 
and other steps taken looking toward the hastening of the day when water 
level is reached. Assay returns show satisfactory values in both gold and 
copper. 

Assay returns as high as $84.32 the ton are being secured from the ledge 
traversing the estate of the Johannesburg Gold and Copper Company in the 
East Manhattan section. Three and one-half per cent of the values are in 
copper, $19.44 in silver and the remainder in gold. Two shifts of miners are 
employed. The tunnel by means of which the acreage is to be prospected is 
in the hill about 35 feet and is being pushed ahead with all the speed com- 
patable with consistent mining effort. The ledge from which the assays re- 
ferred to were obtained has an average width of 12 feet the full length of the 
seven claims owned by the company. 

These claims are located in the east end of the Manhattan mineral zone, 
to the north of the holdings of the Toquima Copper Company, aud are trav- 
ersed by the continuation of the same valuable contact which is yielding high 
grade copper returns on the Toquima ground. Where prospected at surface 
that portion of the fissure crossing the Johannesburg is the equal in point of 
mineralization with the outcrop further to the south. A permanent camp lias 
been established at the property and plans made for thorough development. 
The officers of the company are: Ross Moder, cashier of the Manhattan 
branch of the Nye & Ormsby County Bank, president; A. L. Gibson, vice presi- 
dent; H. W. Shell, secretary; P. B. Bangiar, locator of the property, general 
manager. Mr. Meder is fiscal agent in the transfer of Johannesburg shares. 

A new lead has been opened up in the No. 4 east drift of the Manhattan 
Nevada Gold Mines Company that is showing up better than anything hereto- 
fore encountered on the property. It pans well, showing much free gold, and 
also carries a great deal of sulphides. It runs directly towards the Giant 
property, next adjoining, upon which a rich strike was made a few weeks ago, 
and it is believed that in this new strike of the Manhattan Nevada the same 
ledge has been encountered. 

A new and well-defined ledge of sulphide ore has been opened up on the 
200-foot level of the Mustang that will, in all probability, prove the Mustang 
to be a very valuable mine. The ore is a white quartz, of a high grade charac- 
ter, and shows much free gold as well as sulphides, 



OIL STOCK EXCHANGE 

Oscar Eldridge, Proprietor 

Arroyo Grande, California 

Oil Stocks bought and sold on Commission. Before 
investing call or write for quotations. 



Contract 

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SAN LUIS 
Box 237 W. E. YOULE OBISPO, CAL 



FRESNO COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY 

Incorporated under the laws of California, January 21, 1901 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 

FULLY r»AII> UP 

SEARCHERS OF RECORDS AND 
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No. lllf> K St. 



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King Keystone Oil Co. 

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22 Clay Street 



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SEATTLE BRANCH: 
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REFINERY: West Berkeley, Cal. 



16 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER. 



JOHNNIE. 

Johnnie, Nev., February 1, 1907. 

The Globe Johnnie mine has been sold to a San Francisco syndicate, 
headed by D. G-. Doubleday, for $80,000. The deal has been hanging fire for 
some time, but was consummated last week when the final payments were 
made and the final papers signed transferring the property to its new owners. 
1). G. Doubleday is one of the big brokers in San Francisco, and with him are 
associated some San Francisco and New York millionaires. The syndicate 
has stated that it would immediately begin aggressive development, especially 
on the Globe Treasure vein, which has yielded some of the richest ore ever 
mined in this state. .The Globe is considered the richest mine of the district. 
It is located on the western slope of the Minnie Mae Hill among the famous 
Bowler and Frost leases, which have made records as bonanza producers. 
The property has two shafts, the most remarkable being the Bonanza shaft, 
where the rich ledge of the district was first encountered. Ore has been 
extracted from this shaft that is half gold. The ore is decomposed quartz and 
entirely free milling. Taping the shaft at a depth of forty feet is the upper 
tunnel, which follows this rich ledge for about fifty feet, showing specimen 
rock the entire distance. Development has been stopped on this shaft and 
tunnel until a lower tunnel taps the shaft at a depth of 100 feet. Work is 
now being done on the rower tunnel and the ledge assays $35 across the face. 
The ledge is growing richer and no doubt will soon strike bonanza rock. The 
Bonanza shaft and upper tunnel is now under lock and key and has also an 
armed guard watching it as "specimen thieves" have been busy here and 
many thousands of dollars have been carried away. 

A syndicate has also purchased the Pittsburgh Johnnie, which is composed 
of four claims just to the south of the Johnnie Con. Mine. The price has not 
been made public but the figure is said to be a big one. The Pittsburgh is 
surrounded by such properties as the Johnnie Con., the Bullfrog Johnnie and 
the Boston Johnnie, all producers of high grade ore. A ledge runs through 
the Pittsburgh from which the Pittsburgh superintendent got assays of $12 
in gold, 16 ozs. silver and some lead and co >per. 

In the Johnnie Con. on the 700 level a strong ore body was entered in 
the north drift that shows considerable copper stain. The drift has been 
extended for 110 feet and the ledge is about twelve feet wide. A big ore 
body was also encountered in the south drift that shows specimen rock. This 
ledge is from fifteen to twenty feet wide and is showing a much straighter 
pitch than heretofore. 

Superintendent Browne, of the Johnnie Wonder, has just returned from 
his trip to the headquarters of the company at Denver, and upon his arrival 
immediately proceeded to the property and commenced sinking on the shaft 
on the Copper King claim. Browne says that the company will put extra men 
to work and will develop even more aggressively than before. The shaft in 
the Copper King claim shows a ledge about two and a half feet wide of 
floriated hematite that carries some gold value. 



EUROPEAN OIL MARKET. 

Russian Position. 

During the past fortnight the quotations for Petroleum and its products 
on the Baku market have fluctuated slightly. 

Crude oil for prompt delivery has advanced '/ L . copeck to 24 copecks per 
pood whilst for forward delivery after having risen to 26 copecks per pood, 
the quotation has fallen back to 25 1 /. copecks, which is still in advance of 
% copeck per pood for the fortnight. 

Residuals for prompt delivery have advanced to 25% copecks per pood, 
hut at one time reached 26 copecks. There are now sellers for forward de- 
livery at 271/m copecks per pood. 



Although crude and residuals have advanced, the quotation for kerosene 
fell 1 copeck per pood to 26% copecks, but has now recovered somewhat, 
and is quoted at 26% copecks per pood. There are still no sellers for for- 
ward delivery. 

The quotation for kerosene f. o. b. vessel on the Caspian Sea has fallen 
Y2 copeck per pood to 26Vi> copecks. 

The position at Baku continues satisfactorily and the workmen have cre- 
ated no more disturbances. The production of the Baku fields for the first 
half of the month of December O. S. amounted to 20,478,70(1 poods. 

The market is firm, and unless the production is largely increased, will 
most likely remain so. 

English Market Report. 

The quotations for American and Russian lamp oils on the London and 
Liverpool markets have remained firm and unchanged during the past fort- 
night. The deliveries have been well maintained. 

The quotations were as follows: 
London — 
Russian oil, 5%d ex. wharf in barrels. 
American oil 6%@6%d ex. wharf in barrels. 

Liverpool — 
Russian oil, 6 1 / 4@6y 2 d ex. wharf in barrels. 
American oil, 6%@7d ex. wharf in barrels. 

Indian Market Report. 

During the past fortnight there have been slight fluctuations in the quo- 
tations for some of the lamp oils sold on the Indian markets, but the mar- 
ket has remained firm, and the deliveries have somewhat increased. In the 
Bombay market Russian case oil has fallen 2 annas to 4 rupees. 
The quotations were as follows: 

Bombay — Rupee. 

American case oil 4. 0. 0. 

Russian case oil 4, 0. 0, 

"Elephant" oil in tins 3. 10. 0. 

Sumatra ( ' Rising Sun ' ' in tins 3. 10. 0. 

Borneo oil in bulk 2. 8. 0. 

Burmah oil in bulk 2. S. 0, 

Karachi — 

American case oil 4. 0. 0. 

Burmah oil in tins 3. 3. 0. 

Borneo oil 2. 14. 0. 

Sumatra oil in bulk 2. 14-. 0. 

American oil in bulk 2. 14. 0. 

Calcutta — 

American case oil 4. 6. 6. 

Russian case oil 4. 4. 0. 

Burmah oil in bulk 2. 13. 0. 

Borneo oil in bulk 2. 13. 0. 

Sumatra oil in bulk 3. ■' 3. * 0. 

American oil in bulk 3. 3. 0. 



CALIFORNIA STOCK & OIL EXCHANGE. 

Following are the latest quotations for stocks of oil companies listed on 
the California Stock & Oil Exchange: 

Bid. Ask. | Bid. Ask. 

Alma 35 . . . j McKittrick 10 

Arliue 75|Monarch of Arizona 15 



Capitalization 

$1,500,000.00 



Treasury Stock 

575,000 Shares 



Dutchman Creek of Nevada 
Gold Mining Company 



Incorporated Under the Laws of Arizona 



1,500,000 Shares 

Par Value $1 Each 



Fully Paid and 

. 'Non-Assessable 



First offering of 50,000 Shares at 25 Cents per Share Fully Subscribed. Second and Last 
offering of 50,000 Shares at 30 Cents per Share will be sold 

the proceeds of which will be devoted to further development work. Dutchman Creek of Nevada Gold Mining Co. owns three full claims paid in full and deeded to the company; 
located in the great "Walker Lake Mining District," Nevada, and adjoining the famous old "Dutchman" mine on the west upon which a strike has just been made assaying $1 
a pound or $2,000 a ton. Three ledges on our property show assays of $101.21, $30.75, $15.26. WIRE YOUR ORDERS AT ONCE. 



POMEROY SECURITIES COMPANY, Incorporated 

FISCAL AGENTS 
San Francisco Office, 1300 Golden Gate Avenue 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTKR. 



17 



Port; 

Hotni 

Illinois i "rmli' 15 

luijM rial . . LS 

Inibi . I 7 

I ion .... .11 

Kern . ,10 

Kern River . li. 7."> 

Linda Vista in 



i W. Va. ."1 

3. 21! 

. 1" I'll .III!.. Ill |H 

. 75 Pittsburg . 

- : I McKittriek i;60 





Uerliug 1 .60 E 

Su| 08 

. 18 Thirtj Three 6 

. . . Tim III \ eight 8 

. . . Wabash 

s.im Weal Shore 2.25 

. . Wolverine 40 



SAN FRANCISCO STOCK & EXCHANGE BOARD. 
Following .-in' the latest quotations for stocks of mining comp 
en the San Francisco Stock & Exchange Board: 

CALIFORNIA, 
bid. Ask. 



Mi.l. 



nit . . . 
Boston C i p. 
Brunswick . . 
Ceu. Eureka . 



.is 



Ex. 

llx. 



'ur. Urk. 

.25 Croon B. 

. 7."- Keane Won. 
75 . . . \v. Hercules 

NEVADA. 
Tonopah District. 



Belmonl 

Boston Ton 

( nlifornia 

Cash Boy 

nza 

Old. Anchor 

Gld. ' 'rown 

Gold Mt 

Gold M. Con 

nt. Western n4 

1 -in i Ion 

Borne 

Indiana Ton 

Iowa Ton 

Jim Butler 1 

do. Extension 

Little Ton 2 

MacNam 

Midway 2 



.14 
.n-2 
.nil 
.17 



> .."in M idway Extension 
. is Mizpah Extension 

.21 Montana 

. 13 Moil Mill. Ex. . . 

.03 M. Pitts Ex 

. 12 N. Y. Tn. Con. . . . 

. is North Star 

."7 Ohio Ton 

.ill 
.05 



Paymaster 

R. Rock Extension 

Rescue ' 'mi 

. 15 Ton. Kxten 

03 Ton. (i. West . ... 

T. Home ( 'on 

1. 2D Ton. S. & (1 

,07 Tun. of Nov 

3.00|West. End 

.114 West Tim 

3.00 



3.97 
.15 

.20 
.08 
.40 
.20 
.02 
.03 
.19 
5.00 
.12 
.02 
.03 

1.67 



Goldfield District. 



A ilanis 

Aloha 


.22 
... .13 


.23 

.09 
.40 
.13 
.13 
.15 


G. Souvenir 

11. 3d ( 'liant'i' 


28 


.17 
.25 


Atlanta 


... .85 
... .12 


.10 

OQ 


Band 


Great Bend 

do. Annex 

do. Con 

do. Extension 


1.12 
25 

35 


.20 
.12 


B. B. Extension .... 


... .14 


.36 



MAILED FREE ON REQUEST 

An elaborately illustrated and ably edited resume of the past 
year's developments in the mines and town of Goldfield, to be pub- 
lished under the auspices of the Goldfield Mining Stock Exchange, 
will be sent to any address in the world free of cost. If interested 
in Nevada mines or stocks send us your address. We are members 
of the mining stock exchanges of Goldfield, Reno and San Francisco 
and are the oldest established brokerage house in Goldfield. 

W. F. BOND & CO. 

Goldfield, Nevada 



A STRAIGHT TIP 



The Debenture Surety Company, a prominent brokerage house of 
San Francisco, California, says: 

"The one 'best buy' in Bullfrog today is Bullfrog Extension 'at 
market; ' listed San Francisco Exchanges; selling 20 to 25 cents, an 
advance of ten cents per share in the past few days. Joins Original 
Bullfrog on the north, east and south; four claims paid for; four shafts 
ami tunnel prove ledge for over 1500 feel in length and over 40 feet 
wide and with a depth of 200 feet, gives an enormous tonnage of milling 
ore developed. Complete linisiinw equipment; double shifts of men 
rushing work. Clark's railroad already built across property, town- 
site en Bullfrog Extension ground. Competent, trustworthy nianagenien' 
by San Francisco business men who have made honest, business repiv 
tations. A 200,000-share transaction recently passed through a iocal 
bank. The stock is tailing into strong hands and will advance soon to 
double present price. 



listed 



Ask. 

1 .00 
.52 
.69 
.66 



.35 

.38 
4,00 
.18 
.22 
.10 
.41 
.22 
.03 
.04 
.20 
5.37 

.03 

19.00 

1.90 

.25 



Stock, nnd Bonds Telephone WEST 6155 

High-grade Securitise 
Mines nnd Mining 



Codes — Western Union 

— Private 
Coble — "Borlini" 



Alfred A. Borlini & Co., Inc. 

Capital, $100,000 

OUR SPECIALTIES 

High-class Investments in Tonopah, Goldfield, 
Bullfrog, Manhattan, and Adjacent Districts 

We handle None But the Best 

OUR AIM 

PROFITS FOR CLIENTS 

NOW OTTERING 

Shares in the Bullfrog Fortuna Mining Company at 
25 cents per share. 

Allotment being rapidly subscribed. 

Write at once for our Booklet "Money Talks." DO NOT 
DELAY. THIS MEANS YOU. 

A. A. BORLINI & CO., Inc. 

Suite 33 Saint Mungo Building, I300 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco 



Black Rock . . 
Blue Bell . ... 

Blue Bull 

Blue Quartz . . . 

Brooklyn 

Butte Gldfd. . . 

Booth 

C. O. D 

< 'olumbia 

Columbia Mt. . 

do. Extension 
( oni. Frae. . . . 

( 'ommon 

Conqueror . 
('racket-jack . . 
Daisy 

do. Annex . . . 

do. Extension 
Des. Queen . 
Dia. B. B. Con. . 
Dia. Triangle . . 

Dixie 

Empire 

Esmeralda . 

Federal 

Fawn 

Florence 

do. Extension 

Frances M 

Frisco 

Gld. 
Gld. 
Gld. 
Gld. 
Gld. 
Gld. 
Gld. 
Gld. 
Gld. 
Gld. 
Gld. 
Gld. 
Gld. 



.11 . 12IHibernia 

.26 .27|Highland 

.52 ,54{ Jumbo 

.37 .401 do. Extension 



.00 
. 13 
.04 



1.05 I 
1 .07 

.OS 

6.00 6 
.32 ' 
.26 

.20 



.is 

.OS 

.52 
.65 
.14 

. 16 



611 
,19 
on 
19 
70 
is 



Bar Gld 1 

B. Frae 

Belmt 

Bulldog 

Con 8. 62 

Eureka 25 

Fairvw 

Fissure 

G. B. Ex 

Herald 

of Nev 

Meda 

N. Star 

G. Portland 

Gld. R. King 

Gold Flat 

Gold Hill 

Gld. L. Strike 

G. Kewanas 1.65 

Gld. Rand 



.07 

.06 

05 
15 
34 



.07 Kendall :;:i 

. 14 do. Extension 07 

.96 Kewnnn Ex 1.", 

1 .25iLaguna l .42 

15 I. "lie Star ;ii; 

. . . Lou Dillon 21 

. 10 lanky Buys 

6. 12 Lucky Swede 

.35 Mayno 15 

.27 May Qi 11 25 

.21 iMiil. Pawnee 11 

2.SII Milltown 

. . . Mohawk 17.00 

. 09 do. A nnex 115 

. 12 do. Extension 29 

,53 d". .Junior 09 

.66(Xov. Boy 21 

.16 Nev. Gldfd oh 

. 17 N. Gt. Bend 114 

.:;i! 1 >i-" 511 

. 15|Orig Velvet 

.13 Palace Gld L5 

:; . 75 I'anvan 

. . . IVnnsvl 03 

. . . Potlatch 

.211 Red Hills 30 

1 .25 Bed Lion 14 

. ..iRed Top 

il". Extension 42 

. . . jSa mist nriii 77 

s. 75 do. Extension 

. . . Silver Pick 1 

. os do. Extension . ....... 

.nsS;„ar Gold 

.30 Spear Frae 

.IIS St. Ives I 

1 . 4n do. Leasing 

. Hi Sun Hog . . 

. . . Sunnyside 

Treasure 18 

Verde 

.is Vernal 2f 

05 Waverley 

. 15 Wonder mi 

1 . 70 Yel. Rose 14 

05;Yel. Tiger 



.21 

.10 

4.05 



.OS 

.4S 

..".7 
. 23 
.12 
.10 

. 10 

. :: 1 
.1:: 

.45 



.30 

. Ill 

.711 
.05 
.52 
.IS 
.20 
. In 
.05 
.7:; 
.34 
.10 

4 . 25 
.43 
.78 
.l'i 

1.42 
.17 

1 .on 
.45 

1.25 

.05 

.1" 

. 25 

i 

.13 

.18 



18 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER. 



Alliance 

Aniargosa . . . . 

Amethyst 

Beatty 

Big Bfg 

Blark Spar . . . 
Bon Mt. (I III. . 
Bonnie Clare . 
Bfg. Annex . . . 

Banner . . 

Com 

Con 

Daisy . . . 

Extension 

Belmt. ... 

Jumper . . 

Midas . . . 

of JMev. . . 



Bfg. 
Bfg. 
Bfg. 
Bfg. 
Bfg. 
Bfg. 
Bfg. 
Bfg. 
Bfg. 



Bfg. M. & W. 



Bfg 
Bfg. 
Bfg. 
Bfg. 
Bfg. 



Nat. Bk. . 

N. Star . . 

Sunset . . . 

Victor . . 

Winner . . . 

China Nev 

Croesus 

Deu. Bfg. An. . . 

Gold Bar 

do. Extension 
Gold Ceuter . . . 
Gold Dollar . . . . 

Gld. Bfg 

Gld. Scepter . . . 



Apr. Fool I3x. . 
Atlan. & Pac. . 
Bonanza Ex. . . 

Bulldog 

Comet " 

Doub. Eagle . . 
Gold Wedge . . 

Granny 

Hindocraft . . . 
Indian Camp . . 
.rump. -Tack . . 
Little Grey . . . 
Man. Astoria . 
Man. Atlas . . 
Man. Belmt. . . 
Man. B. Pour . 
Man. B. .Horse . 
Man. Broncho . 
Man. Buffalo . . 
Mau. Carson . . 

Gen 

Con 

Man. Extension 

Man. Com 

Man. Cres 

Man. Cowboy . 
Man. Dexter . . 
Man. Frisco . . 
Man. G. Nug. . 
Man. H. Grade . 
Man. Ivanhoe . 
Man. Hid. Tr. . 
Man. Humboldt 
Man. Jackson . 



Man. 
Man. 



Bullfrog District. 



.15 
.06 

.58 



.06 

.12 
.34 
.05 



Gld. M. Gld. 

Happy Hool. 

Hmstk. King 
.10|Jermain Bfg. 
.OTjLige Harris . 



. is 



.50 
.35 
.3S 

.54 
.14 



.15 
.10 



.10 



. Ml 



.44 



.15 Little Bfg. 

.20 Mayflow. An. . 

.36 do. Consol. . 

.06 do. Extension 
1.05 Maryland . . . . 

. . . Midnight . 

.05 Mont. Bfg. ... 

.49Montgy. Hill . 

. 15|Montgy. Mt. . . 

.lGjMon. Sho. Ex. 

. 0S|Nugget 

.52 North Sho. ... 

.36|Ohio Bfg 

...Old Sol. Bfg. . 

.56JOrig. Bfg. ... 

. ..lOrig. G. B. Ex. 

.15|.Fiute 

.30Ehy. Twnsite . 

. . . |San Fran 

. . .iShoshone . . . . 

.18(Sho. Nat. Bk. . 

,29ISkook. Bfg. .. 
1.30|Steinway . ... 

.ll'Tramp Con. . . 

.33! Valley View . . 

. . . [Velvet 

.06 Wolverine . 

.46 Yankee Girl . 



Manhattan District. 



.04 
.04 
.11 
.03 
.03 



.16 
.23 
.12 

.2S 

.45 



.08|Man. Jumbo . 
.05lMan. Lit. Joe . 
.12 Man. of Nev. . 
. 05|M. Mammoth . 

.04'Man. Mayflow. 
.05|Man. Mohawk . 
. 17!Man. Mon. Ex. 



.16 
.09 



.03 



.12 
.13 
.10 
.67 



.24 
.13 

.80 

.47 
.25 
.13 
.03 
.15 
.09 
.17 
.10 
.08 

.89 
.19' 
.13 
.14 
.11 
.68 
.25 
.08 

]25 



Man. 
Man. 
Man. 
Man. 
Man. 
Man. 
Man. 
Man. 
Man. 
Man. 
Man. 



Monarch . 

Monitor . 

Oriental . 

Oreana . 

Piute . . . 

R. Top . 

Sedan . 

Southern 

Stand. . . 

Vir 

Wolftone 
Mineral Hill . 
Mustang Mn. . 
do. Annex . . 
do. Extension 
Nemo Man. . . . 
Orig. Man. . . . 

Pinenut 

S. Humphrey . 
Stray Dog . . . . 
Taquima Cp. . . 
Thanksgiv. . . . 
United Man. . . 

Whale 

Yel. Horse . . . 
do. Extension 



19 . 10 
.20 
Other Districts. 



Alice Won 

Bullion Hill 

< lapital Won 

Centen. Gld 

Congress 

Cvrus Noble 

Clifford 

E. Gibraltar 

Eagles Nest 

Fairview Aztec 

do. Hailstn 

,1... R. Mt 

do. R. Rock 

Flor. G. R. K 

do. Leasing 

Globe John 

Gld. S. Peak 

Gld. Reef 

Gobi Quartz 

Ida Mines 

Ida Mae An 

Interstate 

Jackpot 1 . 

John Con 

Kawich Gld 

K. Keystone 

Kaw. of Nev 

Lee Bonanza 



21 



29 



:-!S 



.24 
.50 
.07 
.50 
.15 
.18 
.03 
.25 
.32 
.30 
.15 
.30 



Lynx Creek 
Mackey . . . 
Mt. Cedar . . 



Nev. 
Nev. 
Nev. 

do. 

do. 



C. Stock 

Cop 

Hills . . . . 
Extension 
Flor. . . . 
Nev. Sunshine . 
Nev. Gld. Dcv. 
Nev. Won. . . . 
N. S. Wonder . 
Pitts John . . . 
Pitts S. Peak . 
.40 1 Ramsey Won. . 
.40 Red Wing . ... 
Reese R. Gld. . 
Roe. Hmstk. . . 
Round Mt. . . . 
do. Alpine . 
do. Extension 
Ruby Won. . . . 
Searchlight T. 
S. P. Mayflow. 
7 Troughs C. . . 
Toano Frisco . 

Vulture 

W. L. Hiaw. .. 



.19 
.14 
.30 
.25 
.05 
.10 
1.50 
.19 
.03 



.02 
.16 



.06 

. 03 

.05 
.04 

.54 

.»:: 

. 13 

.1)7 

.2:: 
.12 



.19 

.23 



1.70 



.13 

.05 
.05 
.15 



.04 
.07 



.06 

.04 

.30 

.25 

.02 

.10 
.15 
.2S 
.23 
.11 
.50 
.12 
.13 

.09 
.08 

.19 



.10 



. 06 
. 05 
.20 
. 55 
.10 

.IS 
.14 
.09 
.40 
.24 
.14 
.17 
.11 
.21 
.24 
.20 
.10 
.06 
.15 
.07 
.08 
.23 
.29 
1.72 
.20 
.10 
. 94 
.11 

.06 
.06 
.17 
.18 



.08 
.05 
.19 
.15 

.11 
. 06 
. 05 

.05 
.06 
.34 
.07 
.26 
.03 
.12 

.30 
.26 
.13 

.13 

.15 
.10 
.09 
.20 



1.75 

1.70 

.18 

.15 

;: . 95 

.50 
.17 
.50 



30 


.31 


23 


.25 


us 




55 


1.65 




.30 


33 


.35 


15 




1(1 


.11 


00 




06 




27 


.28 


31 


.33 




.30 



.15 
.85 



City Livery Stable 

Hauling of Every Description Done 

A full line of Hardwood Lumber. 
Blacksmithing Done at Standard Prices. 
A full line of Single and Double Rigs. 

Cheney Brothers Coalinga, Cal. 

Coalinga 
Luvepy and peed Stables 

LOUIS MERRILL, Prop. 

DEALER IN HAY AND GRAIN 
FIRST CLASS TURNOUTS 

Single and Double 
AGENTS FOR STUDEBAKER VEHICLES AND WAGONS 

Coalinga California 



a. p. mflY 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

[WHOLESALE AND RETAIL] 

OQost Reliable and Complete Stoek of camp 

supplies and oil men's furnishings 

in Coalinga 

-^g'en.t 
"Wells ZF'stzg'© &z Como.pa,n37- 

COAMNCA, CALIFORNIA 



Wm. Wallace 



B. W. Charlesworth 



WALLACE & CHARLESWORTH 




PLUMBERS, TINNERS and 

Galvanized Tank Builders 

Everything in Plumbing, Tiu and 
Sheet Iron Work 

Estimate furnished on all kinds 

of work 

Oil Tanks, Bath Tubs, Sinks, 

Wagon Tanks, Toilets, Pumps, 

Water Barrels, Lavatories, 

Wind Mills 



P&B 

Coalinga, Cal. 



Agent of 
ROOFING PAINTS 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 



Vol. VIII. No. 8 



San Francisco, Cal., February 20, 1907 



Price, 10 Cents 



THE FIRST TOOL INVENTED. 



Wv can only guess when the lirst iii:ui conceived the notion of t % 1 1 1 jlc :i 
stick ami a stone together to form a bettor club 01 weapon than he could get 
by using either separately. Probably this stone club was the lirst tool in- 
vented, says Charles H. Cochrane in "The Circle" magazine tor February. 
It enabled the possessor to overcome a stronger man or stronger animal. The 
man, or man-brute, as he was then, had only to find a Btone of about the right 
shape, l.reak oil' a tree-limb to suit him, ami tie them lightly together with 
fine roots, hair, or sinews. 

From the stone club it was hut a step to the stone hammer, stone hatchet 
ami spear head, ami a long line of stone implements. It is apparent thai one,' 
man began to use stones ami to chip them into shapes, lie learned ihat certain 
shapes were Inst for certain purposes. The round stone with a handle became 
a maul or hammer — in fact, the very word "hammer" is from the old Scand- 
inavian "liamarr. " which means both rock anil hammer. The fiat-edged 
stone he used as a hatchet or ax. the pointed stones served as spear or lanee- 
heails; flat, thin stones were chipped into scrapers, ami when this paleolithic 
man got an extra sharp-edged piece, he used it for a knife, or the thin, pointed 
stone served as an awl. It is natural to suppose that men lirst hunted for the 
desired shape of stone and later took to chipping them. 

Even the saw was known to these preadamites, who serrated the edges of 
sonic of their stone knives and left them in their eaves, where they have fur- 
nished us the evidence of their ingenuity. 

The first stone implements doubtless were tied to the stick or handle; then 
an inventive genius learned to bore a hole in the stick and inserted the pointed 
end of the stone. A brighter genius bored a hole in the stone itself for the 
insertion of the stick, this being the highest, type of stone implement. 



WEST SIDE OIL COMPANIES MAKE BIG CONTEACT WITH 
STANDARD OIL COMPANY. 



The Mascot Oil Company, of which "Col." Timothy Spellacy is the pre. 
elent, has entered into a contract with the Standard oil Company for the 
delivery of 3,500,000 barrels of oil at a price of 30c. per barrel. The property 
of the Mascot is located in the Midway district, Kern County. 

Several affiliated companies will participate in the above contract, among 
them being the Cresceus, Lockwood, and others. These properties produce a 
lighter gravity of oil than most of the other properties in the field, and was, 
therefore, particularly sought for by the Standard which is now actively en- 
gaged in securing an adequate supply of refutable oil. 

It is stated on good authority that the Standard will begin the construction 
of a pipe-line between Port Harford and the Midway field at an early date to 
transport this production above referred to. It is known that the survey for 
such a line has been surveyed and several rights of way and tankage sites 
secured in the vicinity of Port Harfjrd. Several other companies have been 
approached in the matter of contracting their production and it is believed 
that the present year will see the Sunset-Midway Held shipping its entire out- 
put at profitable prices. 



IN RE THE ILLINOIS CRUDE. 



In a subsequent issue we made a statement to the effect that the Illinois 
Crude Oil Company of the Kern River field had paid a dividend of one cent 
per share which would be the regular rate in the future. We are informed 
by the president of the company— Col. Tim Spellacy— that this is somewhat 
in error wherein it refers to future dividends. A one per cent share basis 
would amount to $2,000.00 per month for the eompany, which, Mr. Spellacy 

States, can bo paid for a time owing to the n lit sale of the storage ml to 

the Associated Oil Company, but when this amount of money has been distrib- 
uted, the dividends of the Illinois Crude will. ..I a B ssin. conform with the 

earnings which amount to from $800 to $1,000 per month. 

We are glad to take this opportunity of correcting an error which might 
be misleading. 



MEXICAN OIL COMPANIES MERGER. 
Special Correspondence to Pacific Mining & oil Reporter. 

Los Angeles, February tilth. 1907, 
The Mexican Petroleum and lluasteea Petroleum Companies of this city 
have formed a merger by organizing the Mexican Petroleum Company, Ltd., 

of Delaware, Which wiM take Over the shares of such stockholders as may desire 
to come into the deal and issue its own stock in lieu thereof. The new com- 
pany's capitalization is $50,000,000, par value of shares $100, 120,000 shares 
being preferred, 8 per cent, non-cumulative, and 380,000 common stock. 

For each 100 shares of old Mexican Petroleum, $1 par value, two shares of 
the company's preferred and one of common stock will be issued. The old 
company was capitalized for $10,000,000,and of which $0,000,000 was issued. 

The lluasteea is capitalized for $20,000,000, of which $15,000,000 is issued. 
For each LOO shares, par value $1, of this, two $100 shares of the new Mexican 
Petroleum's common stock will be issued. 

The Mexican Petroleum's properties at Ebano, near Tampico, Mexico, 
are well known. Those of the Huasteca are in the same region, some adjoining 
and some more removed. The whole are scattered more or loss over a ter- 
ritory covering 100 miles from north to south. The hind has been developed 
to some exlent and is declared by a number of expert oil men, including 
E. L. Doheny, C. A. Caufield, H. G. Wylie, superintendent of the Mexican 
Petroleum, to be much more valuable than those of the Mexican Petroleum, 
although much less developed. 

The stockholders .in both companies are the same. Among them are E. L. 
Doheny, C. A. Canficld, E. P. Ripley, H. G. Wylie, and others. They have 
been acquiring the Huasteca properties at different times during the last six 
years. 

The chief benefits expected from the merger, outlined by President 
Doheny in a circular letter, are the lifting of the liability now resting upon 
stockholders for corporation debts under the California law and raising of 
the par value of stock to $100 which will permit of its listing on the big ex- 
changes of New York, London, and Mexico City, wdiere, it is believed, fully 
twice as much cau be obtained for it as in Los Angeles. 

The Mexican Central railroad which is buying fuel from the Mexican 
Petroleum Company has now 100 oil-burning engines ami is using liquid fuel 
from Tampico to Mexico City and on the branches to Guadalajara, Paehuca 
and Cuernavaca. Its use will soon commence on the northern end of the main 
line. It is claimed that the saving over coal is 50 per cent. 



COALINGA LAND DEAL CONSUMMATED. 

We have authentic advises to the effect that the deal for the purchase 
of the Oil City Petroleum and Twenty-Eight Oil Companies by the Standard 
Oil Company has been consummated and that the consideration amounting 
to $855,000.00 will be paid over at once and distributed to the shareholders 
of the selling corporations. 

It is believed that the price paid for this land, which is approximately 
$3,000.00 per acre for the proven territory of the companies named, is the 
highest ever recorded in the State for any considerable acreage. It was suf- 
ficiently high to induce the principal stockholders, who are all prominent 
business men. to believe that it was wiser to sell than to hope for a greater 
profit by producing and selling at any price likely to be received for some 
time to come. 

The transfer of the Oil City Petroleum and Twenty-Eight Oil Companies 
disposes of all of the properties of the Fresno capitalists of which Jacob 
Clark, well known in oil circles, was the secretary. These gentlemen have 
been eminently successful in the oil development of the Coalinga field where 
they operated for many years without a failure. They have evidently made 
a handsome fortune from the sale of their properties besides having re< 
a large income from their production for many years. At the present time 
they are interested in a small way in the Arroyo Grande field but it is under- 
stood that they will, for the most part, withdraw from the oil business. 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER, 



DEVELOPMENT IN THE COAST FIELDS. 



SANTA MARIA. 

In the Santa Maria field developments continue more than heretofore by 
the operating companies. But no new territory since the Palmer Oil Company 
finished its well has been added. The Coblentz Oil Company, one mile east 
of the proven field, has lately made better forward strides, and Mr. Hall, the 
manager, feels certain of a good well when the proper depth is reached. 

The Union is still everywhere active in field work. The new 8-inch pipe 
line has crossed the Arroyo Grande valley, starting from Port Harford. It is 
claimed that the Union transports 350,000 barrels a month over its 6-inch 
pipe to Port Harford. The new pipe line will give it more than double addi- 
tional capacity, which speaks for the enormous oil deliveries that will be 
made over the Port Harford. 

In addition, the railroad at Casmalia and still more so at Belleravia on the 
S. P., are procuring what oil they can from the Brookshine and Graciasa Oil 
Companies. 

There is now no more question but that the demand for oil is getting 
ahead of the supply. Not but that there is plenty and sufficient oil in the inte- 
rior of the State to supply present wants, and that sufficient would be devel- 
oped at present prices for future requirements, but the difficulty lies in trans- 
portation. 

Time and again have we, as a mere onlooker, called attention to the lack 
of transportation facilities existing in the State at large. Railroad facilities 
in the San Joaquin have grown from bad to worse; the railroad itself for its 
own use and distribution has often been closely pressed for oil. In the East 
experience has long crystalized the oil transportation problem to pipe lines 
and waterways. It can not any longer be expected that cars can freight the 
business of the country and the oil necessary for fuel except for short local 
transportation from the nearest waterway or to pipe line sub-stations. 

In our own field slowly has there been a realization that greater pipe line 
facilities must be had to deliver oil from the field to tidewater at Port Har- 
ford. Up to the first of the year two pipe lines were in operation, the Stand- 
ard's and the Union Oil Company's. Just recently a third line has been put 
into operation from the Graciosa Oil Co's. fields to the California Petroleum Re- 
finery Company's wharf and plant on the more southerly shore of the port, 
reference to which has been repeatedly made in this journal. Now the Union 
Oil Company has the fourth line under way, an 8-inch pipe line from Oreutt 
to Port Harford, passing its own future wharf. From Oreutt to Port Harford, 
the pipe line length ranges from thirty to thirty-five miles, according to the 
route selected. 

"When this fourth line is completed this field will have ample transporta- 
tion facilities. Two pipe lines are already running to the S. P. stations, and 
one southerly to the water front at Gaviota on the Santa Barbara channel be- 
longing to the Associated Oil Company. 

The development of oil wells has hardly kept pace with the increasing 
delivery facilities. Oil prices should long ago have risen in view of the in- 
creasing demand, but it is only very recently, till both the Standard and the 
Associated have felt the need of replenishing their rapidly decreasing oil 
stocks, that they have paid better prices, not on account of business generosity, 
but from necessity, which of course is all that could be anticipated; but they 
began too late. Tn this field we know of a number of oil men in the last 
twelve months who would have come in here to develop more oil territory 
had proper prices been proffered them. 

The Standard Oil Company built two new tanks near Oreutt the last 
year, and they still stand empty. Tn this field of deep and expensive wells no 
company is going to bore wells and practically donate, their product to the 
Standard or to the Associated Oil Company for 25 cents or even 35 cents per 
barrel. Two years ago, with the market not one-third as strong as it is at 
prosr-nt, the Standard paid 75 cents for this product of 27 to 28-degree 
gravity oil. Another mistake that producers themselves have been making — 
they have been overestimating the production of their wells, and this in turn 
lias lipon making purchasers assume that the production was so great that 
producers would be willing to sell their oil at a very low figure. But manv 
wells that started with a 1000 barrels dailv production have, after a few 
months' flow, come down to one-third of the amount; 500-barrel wells have 
come down to from 200 to 250 barrels productivity. 

These facts are not usually given out; we always like to mention the 
favorable side of everything, and when facts are not as roseate as we would 



have them, we are silent. This silence is not always good policy for all con- 
•cerned. There is no question but that our deep wells are fine producers, but 
the bigger producers are taken unjustly as the averagejOf the field. When we 
inquire into the total production of any particular field and hear it talked 
of that they have 500-barrel wells, we never find the average to hold out. If 
a field has ten wells of a supposed 400 to 500-barrel capacity, we usually find 
that the average delivery will be nearer 250 barrels. 

There is plenty of oil in the field, only more wells will have to be bored, 
and a candid statement of this fact will do no harm to oil purchasers any more 
than to producers. 

Field development has been delayed temporarily on account of lack of 
facilities for getting material on the ground. The Graciosa Oil Company has 
found it impossible to push their new wells along as anticipated, not only 
on account of the inclemency of the weather, but because material by the 
transportation companies has been delayed in delivery. Other companies have 
the same experience. Field work has therefore lagged during January, and the 
1 ' Oil Reporter 's ' ' general summary for the New Year 's number is still a fair 
index of the present status of field development. 



ARROYO GRANDE. 

Excitement is rife in the Arroyo Grande field since oil has been found 
in the shallow depths at the Tiber wells. It is claimed that the second Tiber 
well was finished by McClurg under 1600 feet, with just two strings of casing 
at a cost under $4000, the cheapest well ever bored in this vicinity. 

Instead of the shale formations in which oil is found in the deep Santa 
Maria fields, the oil is found in coarse oil sands quite similar to the Kern 
fields, and resembling it also in the relative shallowness of the wells. The oil 
is heavy, about the same gravity as the Kern oil fields. About 600 feet of 
sand is passed through. There is little if any dialomaceous earths found here 
as in the Santa Maria oil field, showing a pronouncedly different formation in 
this as in its other geological formation. The formation also dips very rapid- 
ly. Three miles east the oil sands have dipped fully 1500 feet, if not more, 
and are overlain with wash formations and shales. As a result near by one 
of the wells drilling, the Oak Park, at a depth of 2400 feet, has only seepages. 

No. 3 of the Tiber is 1100 feet deep in oil, and is said to resemble No. 2. 
Nos. 1 and 2 are claimed to be 500-barrel wells each; how long in this pecu- 
liar formation the full capacity of the wells will be maintained is a matter 
that a few months well determine. 

Hardly was it known that the Tiber had the beginning of a production that 
the company was broached as to selling the output for two or three years. The 
S. P. or its purchasing agent offered 25 cents for the oil, saying it was all 
they could afford to pay, but the Tiber company proffered the information 
that they could afford to wait till they were paid better. Thirty, cents was 
next offered, which was again refused. Finally as mueh as 35 to 37^ cents 
for this heavy fuel oil had to be proffered before the sale was consummated. 
This virtually takes all the production that the Arroyo field is at all likely to 
produce within the next six months. All the other wells, except the Squires 
lease, adjoining the Tiber, show deeper formation and more difficult drilling, 
and have each only single wells testing their respective locations. 

Mr. Crandall, formerly heading a very successful Santa Maria oil loca- 
tion, is interesting some Los Angeles capitalists in a lease next to the Squires 
and not very far from the Tiber wells. 

On account of the success of the Tiber eight new companies have been 
organized in this field within the last thirty days, and it is all financed by 
local capita] between San Luis Obispo, Arroyo Grande and even Santa Maria. 
Since prices of oil have been on the rise, people have become over-excited 
about the future of this field. This may turn out to be a very good field, but 
only one end of it has been tested and not in sufficient locations elsewhere to 
warrant the present strong speculative feeling for investments. 

The Associated in this field, nearer still to Port Harford, we are informed, 
are making a good showing. Squires on the Huasna end has shut off the water 
he was bothered with at 800 feet, and is considerably deeper at present. What 
formation he is in we only hear it rumored and so don't know. 



OIL PORT. 

Along the water front, about six miles from the Tiber, Oil Port is loom- 
ing up on San Luis Bay. Extensive buildings keep looming up. The substan- 
tiality of the buildings can be seen by the manner in which the fondations of 
the office is laid — adapted for a city like Los Angeles. These English com- 
panies build for permanency. At San Luis we came across L. A. Phillips, the 
manager of the place, too busy to give us an interview, however. This com- 
pany, the Californian Petroleum Refineries, Limited, is doing the most far 
reaching things possible, following generally the lines of the Union Oil Corn- 
pan v, except that they are having their refinery plant connected by pipe line 
from the Graciosa property at Santa Maria. Both the Union and the Standard 
must transport their oils by ships to a distant refining point, a delay and an 
expense that the California Petroleum Refinery, Limited, overcomes. The 
Union already has found it very profitable to have a smaller refinery near Port 
TTarford wharf to take off the top oil for such fuel oil where the law exacts 
a high flash test. L- F. BLOCHMAN. 



PACIFIC .MINIM; cv- OIL KKl'OWTER. 



COALINOA. 

kUngm, Cal., February 19th, 1907. 

W. A Qra) and bave bought ti" acres in the southeast part of 

,y. Kerr ,t a]., an. I are putting up a rig and will start 
drilling at 01 

Win. Graham has t>.>u^t>i so acres of Thomas A: Warlow, being the N.S ,.t' 

: of 6-21-15, and will begin operations at once. 

A — . i:. t. .1 nil Company is shipping in large amount of mat, rials for 

Mount of acquired lands recently bought l»y them. 

Standard Oil Company, by its subsidiary companies, has been laying 

nit ,,f pipe-line recently, to all parts of the field so as to bo able 

to handle the large production recently contracted :,t 30c for a year, from the 

independent producers. 

Wat, ash Oil Company is down several hundred feet with its No. 8 well 
and has rig for No. '■' nearly ready for spudding in. 

.1. P. Lucey and associates have rig completed on the SW.4 of NW.4, 
21-15, leased from II. B. Guthrie, and will spud in in a few days. 

The Coalings Enterprise oil Company has been incorporated with principal 
place of business at Coalinga, They take over a part of the Enterprise claim 
on Section 6-21-15, by the side of the Lucile Oil Company, a part of which 
property is leased by the Shreeve Oil Company. Hire, 'tors. T. A. O 'Donnell, 
J. F. Lucey, S. K. Bowen, K. W. Dallas and S. A. Guiberson. 

Sbreeve Oil Company is shut down for a few days waiting for repairs 
needed to complete the well. 

Never in the history of ttiis field has there been so much activity as at the 
present time. .Many new rigs will go up in the next few weeks and much 
land is being sought after. The demand for rig material is much greater than 
the Bnpply. 

Section 2-19-15 has two new wells drilling which will open a much larger 
territory. 

West Coalinga is making excellent progress, down 650 feet. Manchester 
Oil Company has brightest of prospects; depth, about 1,150 feet. 



igan oil 1 Develo] t c pany is making goo 

under heavy pressure of water. Are one Inmj some Sand at 1,850 feet. 

Bave excellent prosperity in sight. 

Associated nil C pany lias bought a block of land ill town and Brill 

maintain their own yard, the same as the Limited doi 

No. I. the old gusher of the California Monarch oil Company, , 
tedrilled and it is hoped to have her in again soon. No, M on Section 26 con- 
tinues its usual flow. 

No. 5, California Diamond, Section 12, is 2.I2U feet deep, with 8Vi 
inch easing, and the water is being shut oflF at this depth. Water will be shut 
off with cement in No. 4 within a few days. 

California and New York Oil Company has lately Increased somewhat in 
production. Large deliveries aro being made to tho Associated. 



SOUTHERN FIELDS. 

Loa Angeles, February 19th, 1907. 
Thirty-four gravity oil has been struck in a well drilled by Pitcher & 
Garbutt and the Union Oil Company on a tract southwest of the Amalgamated 
property. The well has taken alternatively to gushing and sanding up and 
its capacity is not known but it is believed to be great and tanks are being 
erected to handle the output. 

The owners decline to give out any statements as to the well's depth, the 
formation or sands. 

The supervisors are wrestling with the problem of road oil for the coming 
season. It is a self-evident fact that very, very bad results have been obtained 
from much of the oiling done so far. "Whe'ther this is due to the inferiority 
of oil used or to the slipshod way in which it has been applied is a matter 
over which oil men, contractors and road masters have been "making faces" 
at each other for the past three years. Both may likely have had much to 
do with it, but the public that pays the bills is getting very sick of the con- 
troversy and the effect has been to greatly discredit the use of oil in the minds 
of many persons. 



Exports of Domestic Mineral Oil From the Pacific Ports of the United States, and Shipments to Alaska and 

Hawaii, During December, 1906 



CUSTOMS DISTRICTS 
AND COUNTRIES 


MINERAL OIL 
CRUDE 




MINERAL OIL, 


REFINED OR MANUFACTURED 




NAPHTHAS, ETC. 


ILLUMINATING 


LUBRICATING, ETC. 


RESIDUUM, ETC. 


Domestic Exports— 


Gallons 


Dollars 


Gallons 
260 
960 


Dollars 

89 

150 


Gallons 

I,5IO 

a, 73° 

1,245 

3,572,350 


Dollars 

360 

452 

239 

183.389 


Gallons 


Dollars 


Gallons 


Dollars 


Puget Sound 


4,279 


319 


6,801 

290 

9.651 


1,079 

144 

2.820 


7.457 
1,223 

2,676 


436 




79 
192 


San Francisco . 


1,050,000 


15.000 


34,800 


3,384 


Total Domestic 


1,054,279 


15,319 


36,020 


3.623 


3,577,835 


1*4,440 


16,742 


4,043 


IC356 


707 


Shipments to Alaska — 






38,500 


7,591 


20,738 


4.424 


4.S86 


1,806 






Shipments to Hawaii— 


4,746,000 


63,800 


70,330 


8,085 


48,876 




8,833 


12,019 


3,641 













Exports of Domestic Mineral Oil From the Pacific Ports of the United States, and Shipments to Alaska and 

Hawaii, for the Calendar Year Ended December 31,1906 



CUSTOMS, DISTRICTS 
AND COUNTRIES 


MINERAL OIL 
CRUDE 




MINERAL OIL, 


REFINED OR MANUFACTURED 




NAPHTHAS, ETC. 


ILLUMINATING 


LUBRICATING, ETC. 


RESIDUUM, ETC. 


Domestic Exports- 


Gallons 


Dollars 


Gallons 
23,400 


Dollars 
4.56o 


Gallons 

3S,36i 

no 

26,288 

11,740 

41,794.771 


Dollars 

7,054 

16 

3.323 

2,H3 

1,770,926 


Gallons 
8,440 


Dollars 
2,795 


Gallons 


Dollars 














1,929,033 

2,812 

1,070,420 

800 


50,492 
120 

'5.54S 
'5 


32,592 

5,336 

99,650 


4,212 

576 

14,627 


121,525 

2,447 

170.520 
15 


22,427 

905 

48,271 

6 


44.605 
6,421 
8,040 


3,006 




394 
5'9 










Total Domestic 










3,003,065 


66.175 


160.978 


23-975 


41.S71.270 


1,783,432 


302.947 


74.404 


59.066 


3.919 


Shipments to Alaska — 








51,000 

4,290 

292,964 

230,068 

2,656 


S.40O 

574 

53.140 

38,19! 

379 


















1,100 

395,789 

163,804 

7.34o 


128 

82,170 

26,403 

I.263 


75 
7L44I 
12,379 

97 


22 

28,436 

4.637 

29 








100 
2.68S. 000 


9 

38,400 














840 


90 




Total to Alaska 










2,688, 100 


3S.400 


5S0.97S 


100,684 


568,033 


109,964 


S;,.992 


33.124 


840 


52_ 


Shipments to Hawaii— 


1,932,000 


43,90° 


85.250 

8,S4o 

456,SS 5 


9,709 

1,280 

60,965 








3,630 
1.225,533 


1.553 
199.390 


8,411 

224. 3S6 


3.024 
69.395 








36.951,100 


827,930 









Total to Hawaii 








38,883,100 


871,830 


550,975 


7L954 


1,229,163 


200,943 


232,797 


72,4'9 














6 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER. 



The old dispute between the Sunset and city producers bids fair to break 
out anew. The plea is constantly put forth that home industry should be 
sustained. Without arguing the merits of the two products it should be stated 
without reservation that this is an utter false position, working not only the 
grossest injustice to the taxpayers and road users but also injuring the oil 
industry of the State as a whole. Good roads are wanted and the oil that will 
produce them should be bought and no other. If the local men can make 
good, very well; if not, let us have oil that will. 

The supervisors, however, followed their usual precedence of dividing the 
business by calling for bids, under new specifications, on two lots of 15,000 
barrels each, one lot to be at least 60 per cent asphaltum, with 11 
gravity, and the other to be at least 80 per cent asphaltum, and not more than 
14 gravity. 

It is probable that portable heating plants will be purchased for preparing 
the heavy oil in districts far from the base of supply where much difficulty 
has been experienced in the past. 

Supervisor Patterson declares positively that he will not use any except 
the heavy asphaltic oil in his district, and that if this can not be had he will 
go back to the old methods of road-making, and use none. He declares the oil 
applied to highways in his district last year was simply wasted, not a trace 
or it remaining. 

The Associated has just been awarded a contract for fuel for the city 
waterworks at 85 and 89 cents, according to the distance hauled. This is 
about double the rates of two years ago and almost as great an increase over 
last year's. 

It is expected that a company of Los Angeles capitalists will be formed 
next week to begin "wild-catting" in the Arroyo Grande district. Several 
prominent oil men visited that field last week and admit their intention of 
drilling but give no details of their plans. 

The Santa Monica Oil & Gas Company has just organized with a capital 
stock of $1,000,000, to drill a "wild-cat" well on section 1, township 1 south, 
range 18 west, ten miles north of Santa Monica, fifteen miles south of Cala- 
veras, and four and a-half miles from the ocean. The land has been in litiga- 
tion several years which has just been settled. No drilling has ever been 
done, but there are said to be seepages and other indications that have caused 
some to form the theory that the producing belt that appears in the Amal- 
gamated, Whittier and Fullerton fields extends to this part. The proposed 
Eindge railroad from Santa Monica up the coast will cross the property. The 
company intends to place stock on the market as a preliminary. Thaddeus 
Brewster is president, and B. P. Welch, secretary. Associated with them are 
J. H. Boberts, J. H. Perrine, Gustave P. Wolfram, and others. 



STANDARD OIL COMPANY PAYS DIVIDEND. 

The directors of the Standard Oil Company on February 15th declared a 
quarterly dividend of $15 per share. The dividend was the saihe amount in 
the corresponding quarter of last year, and $10 per share three months ago. 
The capital stock of the Standard Oil Company is $100,000,000, of which John 
D. Rockefeller owns 40 per cent. Of the $15,0000,000 to be disbursed this 
quarter, Rockefeller will receive $6,000,000. 

Since- 1898 the company has paid $330,000,000 in dividends, and by the 
end of the present year the total will reach $400,000,000, or four times the 
total capital, in nine years. During this period Rockefeller has received in 
all about $166,000,000. 



OIL AND MINING NOTES. 

Associated Press dispatches announce the formation of the Higgins 
World Oil Company, incorporated under the laws of Arizona with an authorized 
capitalization of $6,000,000. It is said that the principal place of business 
will be San Francisco, with a branch office in Houston, Texas. It is said that 
the new company will enter into the extensive producing and marketing of 
oil with a possibility of also entering the refining trade. Patillo Higgins is 
the promotor of the corporation. 

It is reported that the Southern Pacific Company will commence at once 
the work of dredging a channel 400 feet wide and 2,700 feet long near what 
is known as ( ' Timm 's Point, ' ; at the entrance of the inner San Pedro harbor. 
It is said that the Standard Oil Company will use the new channel largely for 
the purpose of loading and discharging its tank steamers of oil. 

It is currently reported that more than 400 miles of 8-inch rifled pipe has 
been purchased by the Southern Pacific Company to complete its rifled pipe- 
line system from Delano to Bay Points. It will be remembered that the rifled 
line between Kern River and Delano was completed about a year ago and 
that the same has been proven to be a successful system for handling the heavy 
oils of the Kern River field. It is authorititively stated by some that a branch 
line will be run into the Sunset, Midway and McKittrick fields, the system 
being intended to take care of the Kern County production. In this event 
the building of a line to Port Harford by the Standard Oil Company seems 
highly improbable as it is not believed that the two affiliated corporations 
would have use for the two lines. 

Several mines in Nevada County have been compelled to shut down on 
account of a shortage of fuel oil. The famine is said to be occasioned by the 
car shortage. The lack of fuel will cause great damage to those mines that 
depend wholly upon steam power as it will be impossible to work the pumps 
and the water will fill up some of the lower levels. 

The Associated Oil Company has declared a dividend of $1.50 per share, 
payable March 1st; as there are 280,000 shares this will mean a disbursement 
of $420,000 to the shareholders. 

The recent heavy purchases of oil lands in the Coalinga district by the 
Standard Oil Company is reported to mean that that corporation has been 
obliged to get hold of some producers in order to protect itself as a supply 
agent. The recent activities of the Associated and Union in purchasing oil 
territory has roused the Standard to a realization that it should do likewise 
to keep its tanks supplied at profitable figures. 

Reports from McKittrick advise that Surveyors Buffington and Greeley 
have completed the survey of the Standard Oil Company 's pipe-line from the 
Sunset-Midway field to McKittrick field, and that work on the laying of the 
pipe will begin within a short time. The pumping plant will be located on 
the S. W. Vi of Section 1, Township 32, Range 24 E. 

The Murchie Gold Mines Con. at Nevada City, Cal., has passed through 
an entirely new ore chute in going from the 800 to the 900 foot levels. The 
new find is considered of great importance. It assays from $5 to $16 per ton. 
Sinking from the 900 level of the Murchie has begun and will be continued 
vigorously until the 1,200 level is reached. 

The Goldfield Eastern Star Mining Company has begun development work 
on their Inferno claim at Bullfrog, located a few hundred feet south of the 
Gold Bullfrog Mining Company's property on which a mill and reducer are 
being built. This is a very excellent property and the company looks for big 
returns on the money spent for development. The company is also developing 



Hammond 
Iron Works 

Warren, Pa, 

U. S. A. 



Builders of 

Steel Tanks 

of the 

Highest 

Grade 




Stills 
Oondensors 
Agitators 
General 
Oil Refinery- 
Work 



SALES AGENTS 

Herman Nieter 

29 Broadway 
New York. 

Krumbhaar&Aiken 

201 Defiegre Building 
New Orleans 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER. 



lit northeast of the Montgomery 

any in ..i i the best managed in the camp 

group .'it Qoldlleld' the company is now arranging tor deep 

ipmenl work and will shortly install a hoist an. I gasoline engine, 

ritioa is under the can- of Mr. Blmei .1. Chute, the official 

map maker of Qoldlleld, and everything is being done to prove up the property 

at the earliet Bible. 



THE OIL MARKET. 
American Position. 
Following are the latest .oast pricee tor mineral oils, refined, per gallon: 
KEROSENE. iiAsoum: eta. 

Waterwhite oil, in l.nlk 10% Red frown gasoline, in balk is 

Pearl oil, 17';. do., cs., 2-5s 25 

Astral. 2-5a 17% Motor gasoline, in bulk 18 

Star, J :.s 17'- do., cs., 2-5s •_•.-, 

Extra star oil, cs., 2-5s 17%186-deg. gasoline, in bulk 30 

star, ca., 2-5s 17'... do., es., 2-5a 36% 

Kxtra Star oil. es., 2-5s 20Vj No. 1 Engine distillate, iron libls. 

Blaine, cs.. 2-5s 26'- or drums 8 

Eocene, cs., 2-5a 20%| do. cs., 8-5s 15 

|.\n. 2 do., iron bills, or drains .... 6 1 /. 

I do. es., 8-5s 13% 

BENZINE— in bulk 12 | 

Benzine, cs., 2-5s 19% 

Russian Position. 

During the past fortnight the position at Baku has undergone a change, 
and strikes have broken out at the works of four firms, and it is feared that 
a general strike will shortly be declared by the workmen. Negotiations are 
at present proceeding between the manufacturers and delegates from the work- 
in. 1 the workmen hope to assist their delegates by striking. The strike 
is spreading, and should it become general will certainly give a serious set 
back to the production at Baku. 

There lias been slight fluctuation in the market for Crude Petroleum and 
its products at Baku during the past fortnight, but the market has been firm, 
with a rising tendency. Crude Petroleum, which a fortnight ago was quoted 
in 24 copecks has now advanced to 24y 2 copecks per pood, whilst for forward 
delivery after having reached the price of 26 copecks, now stands at 25</> 
copecks, or exactly the same as a fortnight back. 

The market in Residuals has been very strong, and the quotation for 
prompt delivery is now 26% copecks per pood, or an advance of % copeck. 
For forward delivery the price advanced % copeck to 28 copecks per pood. 

Kerosene has been in strong demand, and for prompt delivery free on rail 
Baku, the quotation has advanced % copeck to 27y 2 copecks per pood, but 
there are still no sellers for forward delivery. For delivery f.o.b. vessel on 
the Caspian Sea, after having touched 27 copecks per pood, the price now 
stands at 26% copecks, or an advance of y± copeck over the price a fortnight 
ago. 



Indian Market Report. 
There has been ■ considerable increase in thi of Lamp 

the Indian markets during the past fortnight. The quotations have nine 
very little change with the exception of the Karachi market, where there has 
been an advance all •• annas, with the exception of Am 

Oil, the quotation for which has remained unchanged. Slight adva B were 

made in the Bombay market in Borneo and Burraah Oil. 
The following are the latest quotations: 



Rupees, 



Bombay — 

American case oil t. 

Russian case oil | . 

"Elephant" oil in tins :i. 

Sumatra "Rising Sun" in tins 3. 

Borneo oil in bulk 2. 

Burniah oil in bulk 2. 

Karachi — 

American ease oil 4. 

Burmah oil in tins 3. 

Borneo oil in tins 3. 

Sumatra oil in bulk 3. 

American oil in bulk 3. 

Calcutta — 

American case oil .4. 

Russian ease oil 4. 

Burmah oil in bulk 2. 

Borneo oil in bulk 2. 

Sumatra oil in bulk 3. 

American oil in bulk 3 . 

English Market Report. 
During the past fortnight the Lamp Oil market has remained firm, the 
quotations for Russian and American Lamp Oils being unchanged. The deliver- 
ies have increased owing to the cold weather that has prevailed during this 
period. 

The quotations were as follows: 
London — 
Russian oil, 5%d. ex wharf in barrels. 
American oil, 6%d. @ 6%d. ex wharf in barrels. 

Liverpool — 
Russian oil, 6%d. @ 6Vtd. ex wharf in barrels. 
American oil, 6Vod. @ 6%d. ex wharf in barrels. 



8. 


0. 


0, 


11. 


Ki. 


0. 


1(1. 


(1. 


10. 


0. 


111. 


(1. 


(i. 


(I. 


5. 


0. 


0. 


0. 


0. 


0. 


0. 


0. 


6. 


6. 


4. 


0. 


13. 


0. 


13. 


0. 


3. 


0. 


3. 


0. 



Smith, Emery & Co., analytical chemists, formerly in the Crossley build- 
ing, but who lost their entire plant in the San Francisco conflagration, are 
now constructing a building at Howard and Hawthorne streets, into which 
they will move on April 1st. This building was especially designed for the 
company and will, when equipped with labratory facilities, represent an out- 
lay of about $100,000. 

Smith, Emery & Co, have just issued some very interesting pamphlets on 
assaying and analysis which will be mailed free on request to their temporary 
headquarters at 1068 Broadway, Oakland, Cal. 



LviVOY MAlVU^iVO'TURI^G-v OOMI^JVY 



Manufacturers of 



Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet Iron 
Works 



. :-. * ■■' . 


























•— -^ 


■•■•■ - u ' ■■• 














■m^. '$ 


' ^^tSf 


■ 




















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nVv 1 ywF 


















.' J**"*- - s 





















































Oil Well Casing 
Oil Stills 



OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 

Works :Cor. New Main and Date Streets, Baker Block P. O. Box 231, Station C. Telephone Main 196 

Office, 334 fioffch Main Street, Ltos Angeles, Cal. 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL EEPORTBR. 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER 

The Oil and Mining Authority of the Pacific Coast 
Published Semi-Monthly by 

Pacific Oil Reporter Company 

Incorporated 



EDWARD S. EASTMAN 
MARIA R. WINN 
KARL R. EASTMAN 



Managing Editor 

Secretary- Treasurer 

Field Manager 



OFFICE AND EDITORIAL ROOMS 

Suite 37 Saint Mungo Building, 1300 Golden Gate Avenue 

San Francisco, California 

TELEPHONE WEST 6677 



Subscription price, $2.00 per year, in advance, to any part oE the United States, Canada 
or Mexico. Add 51-00 for foreign subscriptions. 

Entered as second-class matter Nov. 5th, 1906, at the Post Office at San Francisco, Cal., 
under an Act of Congress of March 3, 1879. 



THE LIBEL ACT. 



A Direct Blow Aimed at the Freedom of the Press. 



A bill has been introduced into the Legislature of the State of California 
which has in its purpose the muzzling of the press to the glorification of 
a multitude of thieves and scoundrels who would thus surreptiously shield 
themselves from the storm of indignation which is sweeping the country. 
Ostensibly the bill is innocent in form and intended to convey the im- 
pression that it is intended to effect a remedy for the blackmailing 
schemes of certain nefarious publications. But we have adequate 
laws to prevent and punish the crime of blackmail and extortion. 
The libel law is intended to protect the real scoundrel who is never immune 
from exposure through the press. 

We refer to the bill recently introduced into the State Senate by Senator 
Savage; reported upon favorably by the committee to which it was referred, 
and which places the punishment for libel at a maximum of $5,000 fine or 
five years' imprisonment. In other words it makes all libel, criminal libel, 
punishable by an exorbitant penalty. It gives the moneyed and influential 
scoundrel an opportunity to harrass the editor of any publication who may 
oppose his contemptible methods. 

The worst feature of the bill, however, is the clause which makes the 
editor of any publication criminally responsible for the errors of subordinates. 
If a reporter makes an error which can be construed as a libel the editor is 
subject to fine and imprisonment. It is a most vicious attack upon the press 
of the State and is, we believe, unconstitutional. 

The worth of publicity is incalculable. In the industrial world it has 
been the means of creating fortunes. It has also been the means of bringing 
to light numerous unworthy enterprises, promoted by unscrupulous scoundrels, 
preventing the loss of untold sums of money to unwary investors. It has al- 
ways been the privilege of editors to expose shady transactions without dis- 



crimination, and, with few exceptions, the conclusions have been closely drawn 
and fully substantiated by subsequent events. There has always been adequate 
laws to protect any innocent person. 

Under the proposed law if an editor makes a statement at all displeasing 
to the influential citizen, all that is necessary is to swear out a warrant for 
his arrest. And the persecuted editor must practically prove the accuser 
guilty before he, the editor, can regain his freedom. 

"Where there's smoke there's fire," is a common old adage used to 
express the idea that gossip, rumor, hearsay, "muck-raking," or whatever 
one may wish to call it, always has some foundation in fact. The fact may 
be found by investigating the source of the smoke. This theory has long been 
recognized by reporters, detectives, and others engaged in gathering or dis- 
seminating the deed and misdeeds of mankind. With the privilege of report- 
ing the current topics of the times taken away, the editor may as well return 
to a primeval life and till the soil for a livelihood. 



We will suppose that a certain manufacturing company has a general 
reputation of honesty, fair dealing and financial strength. That reputation 
is the concern's best asset. It is its stock in trade, so to speak, without 
which it would be unable to transact business satisfactorily. Then suppose 
that certain firm is of gigantic proportions, that it owns many manufacturing 
plants; operates banking institutions; controls railways and steamship lines, 
and the like. Then the stockholders are known as financiers. They have the 
confidence and respect of other institutions of like kind. They control vast 
sums of money and command credit without limit. They hold the highest 
public offices, or, in the event of its being unwise to hold a public 
office, indorse men in whom they have confidence — such endorsement 
being equivalent to election. They are the leaders of finance, industry and 
society. All well and good. Such a concern is a benefit to all walks of life. 
It should, and does, have the support of the intelligent man. 

Suppose, however, that certain gossip, rumor, and hearsay, takes a turn 
from the beaten paths of the past and our formerly well accredited manufac- 
turing company gains a reputation for unfairness, dishonesty, manipulation 
to destroy competitors, and a general criminal character? Is it not the duty 
of the people, aided by the reputable press of the community, to prove the 
rumors and rectify the wrong? and should a person engaged in such a public 
duty be subjected to criminal persecution, intended to shield the guilty and 
punish the offender? 



Contrary to the prevailing opinion the Standard Oil Company was, at one 
time, generally supposed to be an honest and honorable institution. The 
puplic knew it only as a manufacturer of kerosene, which it much needed, and 
which was a great improvement over the ancient tallow candle. John D. 
was known as a man of exceptional morality; also as the richest man in the 
world. Preachers and teachers alike held him up as an example of perfection. 
It was only those who had dealt with him that knew the truth. But this 
early knowledge of dishonesty was destined to take root and develop gigantic 
proportions with panical results. And the press of the country did the work. 

It is quite possible that, at the present time, the Standard Oil Company 
is more widely known to be dishonest, than it was formerly supposed to be 
honest. This knowledge has developed a hatred that extends to every part 
of the globe in which the Monopoly operates, and is working a change in 



I 




HIS, 10 




m 






Carry in Stock a Complete Line of 

OIL COUNTRY TUBULAR GOODS 
DRILLING RIGS and OIL WELL SUPPLIES 



Bakersfield 



Los Angeles 



Santa Maria 



^ «W M * uem« Nm«i^^ 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER. 



greater than which DO iiuiu baa over H 

BTTCNG II". The ultimata result will 

•*al of bom ■ ■ deal with -iisi m men -or aggregations 

: tni.ht of adequate .-in. I efficient laws t<> dtaorg 



e, thru bonesl men and corporations will 

be tii- d the future, hi California we have bonesl corporations 

is particularly true wherein it pertains to >>il eorporationa. We also 

• oil refiners. We also have tin- usual aggregation of dishonest 

ami unscrupulous ones. Already there i» :i tendency to patronize the bonesl 

Th«- refiner who could formerly plae< |i a of oils on the 

mark- brands is finding himself checkmated and his prac- 

'-•■ii. The marketing companies that masqueraded ;i* independent 

rns, ami which have been pointed ou1 as railroad subsidies, are being 

held Up to public seoru ami contempt. The rebater is no lunger shielded in 

his commission of crime. 

Strange as it may seem the education of the public and the natural resent- 
ment they entertain at what they are taught is bringing about the desired 
change. There may have been a time when the American people wanted to 
be humbugged, but they tail to show signs of such a characteristic today. 
On every side there is seen a desire to learn the truth AND TO PKUFLT 
THEKEBV. 

'•Drops of water, one by one, 
Will wear away the hardest stone." 
And the little drops of knowledge disseminated by an independent and 
conscientious press is wearing away the life and falsi' reputation of the dis- 
houest and unscrupulous. 

Standard Oil was uiiee universally recognized as the financial "Gibral- 
tar" of the western hemisphere. But it is no longer so. Honesty is winning 
over dishonesty, morality over immorality, and innocence over crime. And 
the survival of the fittest shall be the result. 



It is certainly a great misfortune that the Legislature of the State of 
California is contaminated to such an extent that, not only is it impossible 
to enact any law that will have a tendency to deprive the Standard Oil Com 
pany, the Railroads, or any other monopoly, of their financial, political or 
social power, but that laws of which the heading of this editorial is a fair 
sample are profusely introduced and almost as profusely enacted. The Legis- 
lature of the State is a machine, pure and simple, and is not a representation 
of the people in any sense of the word. It is but a part of a great monopoly, 
of which the Standard Oil Company is at the head, and the product thereof 
is best suited to the requirements of the said monopoly. 



THE FOLLY OF WEAK PROMOTIONS. 

Weak promotion is as dangerous to the investing public as is take pro- 
motion. By weak promotion is meant the mining promotion that has not one 
Chance in a thousand of making good owing to the fact that either the ground 
is of no value or the men behind the ground, if it is good, have not the means 
or ability of carrying the enterprise to success. Many of the failures that are 
laid at the door of mining are in reality due to weak promotion. The ground 
is in most cases good but the promoter, in his endeavor to make money, does 
not place the stock at a high enough figure to insure a good treasury reserve 
for the thorough development of the property. The public demanded cheap 
stocks and the promoters gave the public just, what was demanded. The result 
is that there are millions of worthless shares of mining stock in the hands of 
the investing public. The promoter made a little money if he sold his stoek 
Cas1 enough and sold plenty of it. But the public has the worthless certificates 
and many who bought these certificates are of the firm opinion that all 
mining is a fake. It takes much hard work and money to make a mine out of 
a prospect. A couple of thousaud dollars will do the preliminary work of 
proving whether or not a prospect is worthy of a further expenditure of 
monev. But the founders of weak promotion endeavored to make mines with 
a development fund of one or two thousand dollars. They failed. They were 
dishonest in leading investors to believe that mines could be developed on 
this amount of money. Say, for instance, that the promoter sold five thousand 
dollars' worth of stock. Fifty per cent of this money was eaten up in broker- 
age and expenses. The balance went into the ground, and when all was ex- 
pended, the property was still a prospect. Probably the ground was not 
patented and the ground reverted to the government. When a promoter 
asks you to invest in a one or two cent stock ask him where he is going to 
get his money for development work. And also ask him to name one mine 
among all the great producers of the nation that was developed from the 
sale of one or two cent stork. Investors should keep clear of weak promotions. 



Have you seen our 

CALIFORNIA DIAMOND BX 

Casing and Drive Pipe? It's the 
thing for deep wells. Made in fol- 
lowing sizes and weights, and 
carried in stock at all our stores 



Size 


Weight 


Size 


Weight 


5^/6 inches 


20 lbs. 


g5/s inches 


33 lbs 


6% inches 


20 lbs. 


n^j inches 


40 lbs 


65/% inches 


20 lbs. 


12% inches 


40 lbs 


8 1 / inches 


28 lbs. 








DRIVER 


F»H»J£ 






Size 


Weight 






4^ inches 


15 lbs 





THE NATIONAL SUPPLY COMPANY 

117 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

BRANCH STORES 

Coalinga, Gal. Bakersfield, Cal. Orcutt, Cal. 



TUBULAR BOILERS 



Large Dome 
Dry Steam 
Assured 
Full 
Capacity 




Easy access 

to every 

part for 

Cleaning, 

Examination 

and 

Repairs 



of Boilers from 25 h, p, to 80 n, p. on hand lor immediate delivery 



Made of best Flange Tested Steel. Tubes of best American manufacture and of 
standard gauge; Rivets of best quality ; Fixtures heavy and durable. Every 
boiler complete, including following fixtures and fittings: Half arch front, com- 
plete with fire and ash doors 17x17 inches, with draft dampers; anchor bolts 
for front gates and bearers ; rear arch bars ; cleanout door and frame ; wall 
plates and rollers ; smoke stack and guy wire; pop safety valve; steam gauge 
and syphon ; water column of large capacity, complete with water gauge and 
three gauge cocks ; blow-off cock ; feed valve and check valve with nipples. 
Portable outfits and everything required for drilling or boring 
Test Wells. Brass Goods, Fittings and Valves of all descriptions. 



Write for prices 



R. H. HERRON" CO., affiliated with the 

OIL WELL SUPPLY CO. 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

212 North Los Angeles St. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Ill Townaend 8t. 



10 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER. 



One Good Investment is Worth a Lifetime of Labor 



I. COLUMBIA MOUNTRJN 

, J. SHEET^isH Lease on 
combination m 'ne 
% REdtopmin.es 
S BRRpeUftVLEflSG. 






JJ, TKU^l i L.EHSE- 

16 FRANCES MOHfiWK. L£flS£- 

17 CURTIS 8R0S LELASE. 
k* ODOlELLEflSE 

19 LOFTUsV&vis 

2*C0Na«ftT|ON M(Ne 

. Sffft8K N &U»* , -»W».eo 

. S15ILUER AiKiviiigE 
33ATUHNTft MINES 

SSST. IVES MINE 
36HEWKNH NINE . 
37LROUNR MINE 



3BTHIRP CHANtC MINES 
> » C.O.O^ MlNEJ 

•JO LONt STAi) " " 
■MVItrOR 
M.CpftlYELLOW TlCi£f? - 

74 PORTLAND » « 

. S^V^/miCl ' 

it f»U.«u> lime 




MILLIONAIRES' ROW, 



Goldfield GOLD-HORN Minin 

Par value, $1.00, fully paid and non-assessable Capitalization 

JOHN J. DUFFIE, President T. J. DONOVAN 

Directors, J. W. HENDERSON, JOHN J. DUFFIE, 



Several Leases Paying 1,000 Per Cent 
to Investors 

The Truitt lease on the Mohawk in Millionaires' Row, with 
the Hayes-Monnette and the Frances-Mohawk, has proved 
one of the most sensational producers in the camp. It is 
handled by Truitt 's Leasing Company, which sold stock last 
spring to begin operations. Not a pick was stuck in the ground 
until late in May, yet in September this company declared a 
dividend of 25 cents a share out of the earnings, which was 
100 per cent on the investment, and the company announces 
its intention of paying ten more dividends of 25 cents each 
before the first of the year. 

Nowhere else does money work so quickly or earn so enorm- 
ous a wage. 

Our GOLD-HORN LEASE Expires 
September 30, 1908 

We are developing our lease on broad lines designed for big 
work, sinking at this moment a double compartment shaft. 
We have shippers East, North, South, and West, and have 
every reason to believe that we will encounter large bodies 
of high-grade ore in some of the mineralized ledges passing 
through our lease. 



We have the same formation and ledges as the Velvet (which 
adjoins us on the northwest). Fortunes have been made all 
around us. We confidently expect to make enormous and fab- 
ulous profits for all who go in with us. We commenced to sink 
October 1, 1906, with twenty-four months to run. When we 
open rich ore, our stock will rise by LEAPS AND BOUNDS. 



FACTS 



We own a long, valuable lease on gold-bearing ground in 
Goldfield. 

We own 20 acres of proven territory in Bullfrog Mining 
District, near Gold Bar Mine. 

We have purchased for our Gold-Horn Lease the latest elec- 
trical hoisting machinery. 

Our officers are among the big mine makers of Nevada. 

We should ship ore and distribute profits before April 1st. 

Life of our Gold-Horn Lease is twenty-two months. 

Stock to be listed on San Francisco and Goldfield Exchanges. 

In ordinary mining you take risks. Mining by leasing eon- 
tains smallest element of risk, and profits should be enormous 
and quick. 

Vou can purchase Goldfield Gold-Horn Mining and Leasing 
Corporation stock to-day for 20e a share. 

Only 100,000 shares to be sold at 20c ; you should act quickly. 
Order NOW by wire. 



Li 

"0 

duct: 

the i 
duce 
gaod 
as £i 
retuil 
pan! I 
eorp'l 
dend] 
"V 
comp 
comp 
gethr 



Mf 
a si- 
Moll 
of rri 
field* 
MoH 
Lag 
east 



PACIFIC MINING & <HL REPORTER. 



11 



Mining Has Made More People Rich Than Any Other Industry 




GOLD HORN 






'Ik*** 



CENERftLVIEWOF THE 

MOHAWK.COMBINRTION 

ion,flore:nce:*nd 
lonbiwation mines, 

iOLDFl ELD, NEVADA 
u.s.h. 

^. - \ .'CO N*3050 

- 0i« 
ift^orie.uo.Ntv/.i9o6. 



FIELD, NEVADA 



and Leasing Corporation 



$1,000,000 



Treasury Stock, $400,000 



ce-President W. R. MARKT, Secretary and Treasurer 

J. DONOVAN C. L. KNOWLTON, W. R. MARKT 



Pay Biggest and Quickest Dividends 

d camp is not three years old, and the daily pro- 
fellow metal has reached the $100,000 mark, or at 
,000,000 per month, most of which is being pro- 
asing companies. A good leasing company on a 
s a good thing for investors and stockholders; for 
veir money is put directly in the ground and the 
often quick and profitable. Several leasing com- 
just paid dividends. There are a score of other in- 
eases that soon will enter the producing and divi- 
list. 

ict that more dividends will be paid out by leasing 
luring the coming year than from all the other 
f the camp working on company account put to- 
ditorial Goldfield "News." 



advanced in one year from 15 cents to $20.00 
That's a profit good enough for any one. 
d Jumbo are to-day beyond the financial reach 

Wis. But there will be other Mohawks in Gold- 
all, it only required development work on the 
d open up its vast ore bodies. Red Top, 

Md-Horn and St. Ives, all in line and directly 
Mohawk, are in line for Mohawk's success. 



For a Limited Time We Offer 

Fifty thousand shares of the treasury stock at 
twenty cents per share. 

This allotment will soon be over-subscribed. We 
have no salaried officers, a healthy treasury, and 
no debts. This is an opportunity of TO-DAY. 

Wire your subscription immediately, and remit 
by mail. Address : 

W. R. MARKT, 

322 Bush St., San Francisco, Cal. 
References: 

Italian-American Bank, San Francisco. 
Nevada Bank & Trust Co., Goldfield. 



12 



PACIFIC MINING & OIL REPORTER. 



NEVADA. 



Goldfield. 

Goldfield, Nev., February 16. — Conservative judges, men whose exteuded 
experience and close observation entitle their orjinions to respect, unite in the 
verdict that the Nevada market has never before now been in a healthier state. 
Prices have been higher, but never firmer. Trading lias been heavier, but 
never before confined to securities of so high a class. With the relief from 
depression that came with the lifting of the strike embargo, quotations soared 
skyward in bewildering manner. Holders of Nevada shares made hundreds 
of thousands of dollars in margins while they slept. The week ending on 
January 12th was the largest, with one exception, in the history of the Ltold- 
field Mining Stock Exchange, the sales running to $1,272,140. The record week 
of the exchange was that one ending November 10th, whose sales wero 
$1,294,547.50. This November week was that one which saw the spectacular 
advance of Mohawk and the other mines that were taken into the great fifty- 
milliou-dollar merger of the Goldfield Consolidated Mines Company. Since 
January twelfth, the profit takers have shown their hands and the result has 
been a gradual*, but not an alarming, decline in prices and volume. 

After the strike was over there were floated treasury and capital stocks 
of a large mrniber of new companies in Goldfield, the popular demand calling 
for prospect securities that were offered at from five cents to twenty cents 
the share. The home talent was as greedy for such investment as the outsider 
and the result was an enormous sum of money spent for stock that was unlisted, 
proceeds of sales forming no part of the record of the exchange. Had it not 
been for this it is probable that the official records would have shown as large 
a business for the last half of January and the first part of February as ap- 
pear upon the records of the famous weeks of last November. A noteworthy 
feature of this wild scramble for shares that represent annexes, extensions 
and fractions near ground of proved merit was the very perceptible leaning 
to the Diamondfield section of Goldfield district, which provided ninety per 
cent of the territory so exploited. That the Diamondfield end of Goldfield 
district is fast growing in public favor is further evidenced by the recent 
large manipulations in that region by such operators as Diamondfield Jack 
Davis, Senator T. L. Oddie, Donald Gillies, Frank Golden, Col. O. P. Posey, 
E. A. McKnaughton,' W. V. Eyan and John MeKane. Another noteworthy 
feature is that every one of these new flotations is being liberally developed 
and all that are listed are holding their own on 'change. It is a good guess 
that the subsequent decline in the older securities was largely attributable to 
the fact that many holders, who had made large profits, threw upon the 
market enough of the high-priced stocks to buy the juveniles for a prospect 
of repeating former ventures. 

Nothing more plainly tells the tale of stock doings on the Goldfield ex- 
change than the following table, giving figures for each week since that one 
ending August 25th. The first column below gives the date of'the week's end- 
ing; the second, the number of shares sold on the Goldfield board; the third,' 
their total value, and the fourth the average price per share of all stocks 
changing hands: 

August 25 1,45.7,085 $ 524,888.75 $0.36 

September 1 1,045,620 360,341.15 .34 

September 8 440,300 215,294.75 .48 

September 15 759,550 358,460.50 .45 

September 22 1,521,000 480,426.00 .31 

September 29 1,479,S00 371,262.75 .25 

October 6 1,485,775 381,867.00 .25 

October 13 1,426,275 302,082.75 .29 

October 20 1,026,483 . 294,845.67 .28 

October 27 1,840,716 823,624.60 .44 

November 3 2,583,500 1,180,269.50 .45 

November 10 2,665,400 1,294,547.50 .48 

November 17 1,888,948 985,572.50 .52 

November 24 1,668,862 909,822.40 .54 

December 1 1,664,349 845,928.75 .51 

December 8 1,717,350 682,965.50 .39 

December 15 1,172,966 427,325.30 .36 

December 22 1,015,775 389,469.25 .38 

December 29 515,614 204,476.10 .39 

Ja nuary 5 787,300 342,578.25 .43 

January 12 2,578,160 1,272,140.00 .49 

January 19 1,513,800 9+5,327.00 .62 

January 20 1,227,900 751,518.25 .61 

February 2 984,225 763,741.00 .77 

Total— 24 weeks 34,466,753 15,108,775.22 

Average 1,436,114 629,532.30 .44 

Of the several interesting and enlightening contrasts and comparisons 
afforded by the above tabulation probably the most significant are to be found 
in the last column, which shows for the last few weeks a steady increase of 



NEVADA STOCKS 

We buy and sell all Nevada Mining Stocks. Maps and 
Market Letter free. We have our own brokers on all 
Exchanges. Banking and commercial references- 

Debenture Surety Co. 

(INC.) 

SUITE 6, 368 BUSH ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



BULLFROG. 



The BULLFROG SHOSHONE-INDEX MINING COMPANY, just organ^ 
izing, offers the first allotment of its stock at the low price of FIVE CENTS 
per share, par value $1.00. Stock fully paid and non-assessable. 

The Company owns a fraction claim situated in the center of the property 
of the great Montgomery-Shoshone Company whose stock is selling at $17.00 
per share. They also own the HENNEPIN, PANHANDLE and the BROAD- 
WAY claims, situated adjacent to the Black Spar mine and in one o